Jump to content

nashvillwill

City Parks/Greenways

Recommended Posts


23 hours ago, CenterHill said:

^^ Thanks, Brett.    That is how the detour works, generally (although on one of my runs during CMA week, the north gate was open and I entered there, only to find the south gates locked, so I had to backtrack back out and around).    Anyway, much like the Sounds stadium greenway, one wonders why the Ascend greenway was not designed with a continuous path outside of the venue.    eg, connect the green path along the river with the yellow path under the KVB bridge.     I can't believe that the need for the detour system you describe only became apparent after Ascend was built.    Clearly it was foreseen that the red paths would have to be closed during events and during setup.   

         

These are all good points.  I can't speak to the design process that went into planning Ascend Amphitheater since I was not following it that closely at that time (perhaps as recently as 2013?  Here is a contemporary Nashville Scene article http://www.nashvillescene.com/nashville/between-a-public-squabble-and-a-much-criticized-design-alls-not-quiet-on-nashvilles-west-riverfront/Content?oid=3961589).  I can only state that Metro Parks staff worked with CM O'Connell and me to address these matters and made a presentation at a BPAC meeting late last year to discuss these plans.  Several aspects of concert show-date operations at Ascend have been and continue to be works in progress.

Edited by bwithers1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, bwithers1 said:

These are all good points.  I can't speak to the design process that went into planning Ascend Amphitheater since I was not following it that closely at that time (perhaps 2013?).  I can only state that Metro Parks staff worked with CM O'Connell and me to address these matters and made a presentation at a BPAC meeting late last year to discuss these plans.  Several aspects of concert show-date operations at Ascend have been and continue to be works in progress.

Hey Brett. Any chance there are any plans in the works for more sizable parks in SoBro, the CBD, or the Gulch? Seems like Metro controlled land (for example: the front lawn or behind the Howard Office Complex) would make a great space for a downtown park (think Union Square vibe in NYC). As we get more and more residents downtown, parks will be beautiful long term assets for our city

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, nashwatcher said:

Hey Brett. Any chance there are any plans in the works for more sizable parks in SoBro, the CBD, or the Gulch? Seems like Metro controlled land (for example: the front lawn or behind the Howard Office Complex) would make a great space for a downtown park (think Union Square vibe in NYC). As we get more and more residents downtown, parks will be beautiful long term assets for our city

Given the extremely high cost of land in the urban core, I am not certain that there are any current plans for "more sizable" parks in these areas.  There could theoretically be "more" parks, but it is debatable how "sizable" they would end up being barring a cap over the interstate system.

Metro did recently enter into a participation agreement for the construction of a new park in the North Gulch area http://www.nashville.gov/mc/ordinances/term_2015_2019/bl2016_149.htm.  During Council deliberations on this ordinance, At-Large Council Member John Cooper referenced the fact that the Downtown Code presently provides height/density bonuses for many things, but not the provision of green space, which would largely require Metro to purchase land for additional parks if they are to be added in that area.  That discussion about DTC could continue at some point.

Just to put things into context, the larger CBD/Sobro/Gulch area presently has access to Riverfront Park and the greenway; Hall of Fame Park; Public Square Park; Church Street Park; the lands surrounding the State Capitol; Bicentennial Mall; Cumberland Park across the bridge; and not too far to the west is Centennial Park.  As you mention, the Howard Office Complex and the Frist Museum do provide some degree of additional green space which could arguably be better programmed. The Division Street Connector should include landscaping, and the Gulch Pedestrian Bridge could potentially come back online at some point.

While I do agree that parks are assets and grow more desirable as population in the downtown area increases, Nashville's urban core and even our downtown will never have density anywhere close to that of Manhattan.  Our population density is much lower and more scattered, with it our parks system needs to be located in several distant areas in order to serve the whole county. NashvilleNext cited Southeast Nashville as being a park priority zone for our county.  Metro is also investing in programming for some lands that were purchased under the last administration's open space plan.  

Having said that, Metro Parks is conducting an update of the Parks Master Plan (last updated in 2002) and you are welcome to participate in that program, which is called Plan To Play http://www.nashville.gov/Parks-and-Recreation/Plan-To-Play.aspx.

Edited by bwithers1
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, bwithers1 said:

Given the extremely high cost of land in the urban core, I am not certain that there are any current plans for "more sizable" parks in these areas.  There could theoretically be "more" parks, but it is debatable how "sizable" they would end up being barring a cap over the interstate system.

Metro did recently enter into a participation agreement for the construction of a new park in the North Gulch area http://www.nashville.gov/mc/ordinances/term_2015_2019/bl2016_149.htm.  During Council deliberations on this ordinance, At-Large Council Member John Cooper referenced the fact that the Downtown Code presently provides height/density bonuses for many things, but not the provision of green space, which would largely require Metro to purchase land for additional parks if they are to be added in that area.  That discussion about DTC could continue at some point.

Just to put things into context, the larger CBD/Sobro/Gulch area presently has access to Riverfront Park and the greenway; Hall of Fame Park; Public Square Park; Church Street Park; the lands surrounding the State Capitol; Bicentennial Mall; Cumberland Park across the bridge; and not too far to the west is Centennial Park.  As you mention, the Howard Office Complex and the Frist Museum do provide some degree of additional green space which could arguably be better programmed. The Division Street Connector should include landscaping, and the Gulch Pedestrian Bridge could potentially come back online at some point.

While I do agree that parks are assets and grow more desirable as population in the downtown area increases, Nashville's urban core and even our downtown will never have density anywhere close to that of Manhattan.  Our population density is much lower and more scattered, with it our parks system needs to be located in several distant areas in order to serve the whole county. NashvilleNext cited Southeast Nashville as being a park priority zone for our county.  Metro is also investing in programming for some lands that were purchased under the last administration's open space plan.  

Having said that, Metro Parks is conducting an update of the Parks Master Plan (last updated in 2002) and you are welcome to participate in that program, which is called Plan To Play http://www.nashville.gov/Parks-and-Recreation/Plan-To-Play.aspx.

I addition to everything Brett said above, there is also the new Boathouse Park in the works that could be as much as 23 more acres if everything comes to pass.  In the image below, it would bell the greenery along the river on the north over to the I-24/65 overpasses on the east, then curving down along Anthes Drive on the south over to near Middleton Street on the west, then running upward to the CSX tracks and back the west (a triangular notch).  It would be connected to Ascend Amphitheater/Riverfront Park with a river walk. The Pyles Transport and Nashville Inner City Ministry would each be relocated, and the former State Vocational Rehab Building would either be redeveloped into a Park Recreation Center, or be razed.  

 

Screen Shot 2016-06-22 at 2.13.06 PM.png

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, nashwatcher said:

23 acre boathouse park?

Well that's just awesome. Any idea if it will have lots of hangout areas for downtown residents to enjoy?

Absolutely.  Will feature rentals of canoes, kayaks, paddle boats, etc., as well as a river walk, paths, gardens, dog park, some playing fields, etc. From what I have heard, they will keep quite a lot of the trees. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At our monthly meet-up last Saturday we discussed this lot as a potential park.  It would serve The Gulch and LoLa.  It is triangular in shape and borders Gleaves on the south, Pine Street on the west, and the CSX tracks on the north/east.  Could house a nice playground, dog park, and some general greenery (especially a row of trees to block the view of the railroad yard.  We believe CSX may own the land.

Looking east from the corner of Pine and Gleaves Streets:

Gleaves and Pine Park idea.JPG
 

Screen Shot 2016-07-08 at 8.39.46 AM.png

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is this where the pedestrian bridge is to connect from across the tracks? I wasn't sure if it was this parcel or the other side of Pine Street Flats. If the later is true then I agree that this would make a nice park and have it connected to the pedestrian bridge. Hopefully something will happen sooner than later.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, markhollin said:

At our monthly meet-up last Saturday we discussed this lot as a potential park.  It would serve The Gulch and LoLa.  It is triangular in shape and borders Gleaves on the south, Pine Street on the west, and the CSX tracks on the north/east.  Could house a nice playground, dog park, and some general greenery (especially a row of trees to block the view of the railroad yard.  We believe CSX may own the land.

Looking east from the corner of Pine and Gleaves Streets:

Gleaves and Pine Park idea.JPG
 

Screen Shot 2016-07-08 at 8.39.46 AM.png

IMO, what really should be done by the city is to spend some of those proposed billion $$$ for the Radnor acquisition, and apply it to reclaiming some of what remains in the Gulch proper, and repurpose it for high-capacity transit ─ this portion of the Kayne Ave. Yard and/or property at the north end or even the central portion.  Much if not most of it already has "given up the ghost', during the last 12 years, and once it's all gone, then there's little if any chance ─ most likely, absolutely no chance ─ of eventual consolidation of any urban or commuter rail in the core, much less within the CBD or in close proximity to it.  volsfanwill and I both brought this up very recently in the Trans thread, and since this is germane to property in subject, I have chosen to leave the photos with the quoted post, for illustration.

Edited by rookzie
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nashville's preliminary parks master plan, called Plan to Play, released on Wednesday, recommends 4,541 acres of new parkland be added to Nashville’s parks system by 2026. This includes 130 acres specifically for new greenways.


http://www.tennessean.com/story/news/2016/10/13/plan-calls-4541-more-nashville-park-acres/91996752/

Summary of the recommendations:

Land

Pocket parks (small parks up to three acres in size, includes school playgrounds) — 37 new acres

Neighborhood parks (between three and 20 acres in size) — 226 new acres

Community parks (between 20 and 100 acres in size) — 379 acres

Regional parks (100 or more acres in size) — 3,187 new acres

Signature parks — 141 new acres

Special use park (including sports facilities/fields) — 440 acres

Greenway corridors — 130 acres

Total park acres — 4,541 acres

Land bank acres — an additional 290 acres

Facilities

Top unmet needs:

1. Paved multiuse trails — 114 new miles needed

2. Unpaved/hiking trails — 27 new miles

3. Picnic shelters — install in existing parks and prioritized areas; 17 new shelters recommended

4. Recreation / fitness centers — add 411,396 square feet across county; also create new type of recreation centers

5. Playgrounds — add 65 new playgrounds; utilize schools to fill gaps in playground service

6. Dog parks — add eight new dog parks; ensure one dog park for every 50,000 residents

7. Aquatic facilities — add 11 new facilities, including regional indoor pools and facilities that can accommodate swimming tournaments

8. Historic sites — establish new goals for historic sites regarding visitation, programs and operations; explore adaptive reuses at certain facilities to expand offerings

9. Community gardens — focus on areas where neighborhood interest and organizational support is high

10. Canoe / kayak access — develop a plan to guide and prioritize water access; seek opportunities via providers and partnerships to expand adventure recreation needs

11. Park cafes and concessionaires in parks — identify existing spaces in parks for concessions and opportunities to further promote parks  

12. Multipurpose fields — expand by 36 fields; including a fieldhouse/sportsplex to expand services.

Programs

Top unmet needs:

1. Outdoor recreation programs — offer programs across Nashville’s diverse geography; continue to expand focus on outdoor recreation youth programming; increase nature programs

2. Exercise / workout classes — launch a seniors program initiative with dedicated staff; fully utilize existing space to expand programs to meet user demand

3. Health and wellness programs

4. Art programs — expand arts programming into more recreation centers in the community; provide more programs in available space

5. Summer enrichment programs — increase capacity and promote program offerings

6. After-school programs — increase capacity and promote program offerings

Other program recommendations: Expand B-cycle bike-share program in parks and along greenways and partner with nonprofits, volunteers and third parties to program and activate downtown parks.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^ couldn't agree more, dNd.    I ride out there along the greenways (Shelby - Stones River - to the dam).    That stretch through Stones River Bend, from the water works to Stone Hall, is just gorgeous.     

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Flipped through the parks plan earlier.    It's a firehose of information and data and will take a while to digest.   

Glad to see the recommendation for interstate cap parks made it in.    

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From the Nashville Post:

The Metro Parks Department has landed a permit related to its Smith Springs Community Center.

American Constructors is handling the building of the structure, with the permit valued at $9.3 million.

The center, to span 31,000 square feet, will have an address of 2801 Smith Springs Road.

Nashville-based Hastings Architecture Associates has designed the facility.
 

Screen Shot 2017-05-03 at 5.55.42 PM.png

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.