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The Transportation and Mass Transit Megathread


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33 minutes ago, nativetenn said:

Really? I haven't experienced any slowdowns on that part of 840 (or any other part for that matter). Maybe I haven't driven through it during rush hour. I have driven through the 65/840/Hwy 431 interchange regularly between 8am and 9am, and I've experienced some merging congestion there. But that has never come to a steady slowdown for me.

Yeah...I've driven through there many times around 6pm and has come to a complete standstill when you get close to M'boro.   But...that whole stretch is WAY busier than it was 5 years ago.  I bet they'll end up having to widen 840 between 24-65 within 10 years.

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Well....those "clueless people" happened to do over 100 town halls (attended by over 10,000 people) and a tremendous amount of research in putting that proposal together that many folks happen to thin

There was another couple of articles in the NBJ. It was a both side of the coin approach, as Charles Robert Bone Pro and Joe Scarlett Con shared their views.  The one comment Scarlett proposed wa

The land bridge to which markhollin has referred was  formally proposed in 2016 by Metro, as a component of the  Gateway to Heritage Walking Improvements initiative.   This particular land bridge woul

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1 hour ago, nativetenn said:

Really? I haven't experienced any slowdowns on that part of 840 (or any other part for that matter). Maybe I haven't driven through it during rush hour. I have driven through the 65/840/Hwy 431 interchange regularly between 8am and 9am, and I've experienced some merging congestion there. But that has never come to a steady slowdown for me.

I don't regularly drive 840, but I have experienced it being bumper to bumper traffic during rush hours and I have seen it turn into a parking lot a few times. It's also very busy between Lebanon and Gladeville

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Interesting story on scooters in today's Tennessean. After 3 deaths since May, Atlanta is banning scooter use from 9pm to 4 am. A CDC study in Austin showed 192 incidents in 3 months of 2018, Nearly half were head injuries, 15% of those were traumatic brain injuries. Less than 1% of the injured wore helmets.

From a client this week, Milwaukee is going through a similar scooter debate. Scooters were dumped into the city with no warning or permits. They were banned and then Lime allowed to have 500, under rules. It's not working, as scooters are still primarily ridden on sidewalks and left wherever. Not enough bike lanes or help from the city. Small but vocal group pushing group to remove them. The mayor is trying to work with them though.

Edited by Nash_12South
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1 hour ago, Nash_12South said:

Interesting story on scooters in today's Tennessean. After 3 deaths since May, Atlanta is banning scooter use from 9pm to 4 am. A CDC study in Austin showed 192 incidents in 3 months of 2018, Nearly half were head injuries, 15% of those were traumatic brain injuries. Less than 1% of the injured wore helmets.

My understanding is that ATL is also putting a curfew on rental ebikes. I think this is a slippery slope. If eBikes, then why not all bike share? Why not all cyclists? I think bikes (and ebikes) are fundamentally different than scooters in terms of user comfort/past experience, acceleration rate, and generally not attracting joy riders. Regulating them exactly the same (as we also do in Nashville despite not yet having them in the market) doesn’t make a ton of sense to me.

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I doubt they'd be regulating anything without good reason. It's likely as with the scooters, people unwilling to follow the rules.

I'd have much less problem with scooters were it not for adults, too self centered, too self absorbed to read and follow pretty straightforward rules. Don't agree with the rules, don't ride the scooters.

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1 hour ago, nashvylle said:

This is honestly the best news I’ve heard for transportation in Nashville’s history. 

a republican governor to be on board with anything other than “more interstates more highways” is a huge win. 

Agreed.  I must admit I am eating crow because I never in a million years thought that it would be Governor Lee who would be the one to get the transit momentum moving again in the right direction.  Good on ya gov'na!  You have impressed me today.  

Edited by BnaBreaker
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In its eleventh hour, Nashville Metro Council rejected a call for a ban on electric scooters in Nashville. 

In the last council meeting of the four-year term, council members voted Tuesday night against legislation by Council member Steve Glover for a complete and full ban in a 7-24 vote. 

Now, scooters will stay in Nashville until a selection process to allow up to three companies to operate in the city if they meet certain requirements is finalized in the next few months. 


More at The Tennessean here:

https://www.tennessean.com/story/news/2019/08/20/nashville-rejects-ban-electric-scooters-metro-council-vote/2062869001/

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And I repeat! For any rail or dedicated bus transit to be accepted (and successful) in Nashville, the routes will have to be parallel to the main thoroughfares, NOT on them. Citizens don't want to compete with trains/buses on the same roads.  There's a  throwback to when the first MARTA lines were approved (voted on by the various counties. In Fulton, the biggest concern outside of cost was that a transit alternative would take up precious street space. Once the routes were planned and communicated to voters, it received favorable support.

Yes, it was a different era, and sales taxes in Atlanta were relatively low. But the sales job was long and cut across three levels... cost, access, traffic mitigation. Of course, they did a few things really poorly such as not taking a line closer to the old Fulton Co. Stadium. 

Nashville's pitch last year failed b/c of the mayor, her grandiose plan for a tunnel (aka subway) and the pitch was never made to people who thought/knew they'd never use it. 

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28 minutes ago, MLBrumby said:

And I repeat! For any rail or dedicated bus transit to be accepted (and successful) in Nashville, the routes will have to be parallel to the main thoroughfares, NOT on them. Citizens don't want to compete with trains/buses on the same roads.  There's a  throwback to when the first MARTA lines were approved (voted on by the various counties. In Fulton, the biggest concern outside of cost was that a transit alternative would take up precious street space. Once the routes were planned and communicated to voters, it received favorable support.

Yes, it was a different era, and sales taxes in Atlanta were relatively low. But the sales job was long and cut across three levels... cost, access, traffic mitigation. Of course, they did a few things really poorly such as not taking a line closer to the old Fulton Co. Stadium. 

Nashville's pitch last year failed b/c of the mayor, her grandiose plan for a tunnel (aka subway) and the pitch was never made to people who thought/knew they'd never use it. 

That will probably not work becuase there is no where to put the lines coming in from the burbs. They key is you take the HOV lanes away from the drivers, put the mass transit there, rail or bus,  then it forces the decission on them as to if they want to be stuck in traffic or on transit. The state already owns the right of ways, but getting them to give it up and the feds on board is another thing all together.

You can bring all the transit in the state into downtown, but if there is not a viable way to move the bodies around once they are there, then all of that rail or bus transit is absolutely useless.

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Putting a multi-billion dollar transit initiative to a public referendum presents an enormous challenge for any city.    It's difficult to generate buy-in for transit across the needed majority of voters, when less than a majority believe they will personally use it.    That's just how people vote and it's why transit referendums fail in city after city (with a few exceptions).    In Nashville's case, you can add to that the additional factors referenced above (particularly a mayor's office in disarray), including that prior to the referendum, the mayor and council were publicly grappling with budget shortfalls and cutbacks to schools, police and other services.      

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33 minutes ago, smeagolsfree said:

That will probably not work becuase there is no where to put the lines coming in from the burbs. They key is you take the HOV lanes away from the drivers, put the mass transit there, rail or bus,  then it forces the decission on them as to if they want to be stuck in traffic or on transit. The state already owns the right of ways, but getting them to give it up and the feds on board is another thing all together.

You can bring all the transit in the state into downtown, but if there is not a viable way to move the bodies around once they are there, then all of that rail or bus transit is absolutely useless.

Buses can be used inside the loop.

LRT (if that ever gets the green light) can go along other public rights of way (e.g. Hayes Street to Grundy Street with a stop at Rosa Parks). Nashville getting close to missing that boat! Of course, they missed COMPLETELY being able to buy enough land in SoBro for a transit stop. I mean, who wouldn't have seen a convention center transit hub being essential for any transit plan? The (lack of) foresight of Nashville officials is appalling.

30 minutes ago, CenterHill said:

Putting a multi-billion dollar transit initiative to a public referendum presents an enormous challenge for any city.    It's difficult to generate buy-in for transit across the needed majority of voters, when less than a majority believe they will personally use it.    That's just how people vote and it's why transit referendums fail in city after city (with a few exceptions).    In Nashville's case, you can add to that the additional factors referenced above (particularly a mayor's office in disarray), including that prior to the referendum, the mayor and council were publicly grappling with budget shortfalls and cutbacks to schools, police and other services.      

So do you think Nashville officials should just give up on transit? Some people do. 

I also think part of the failure of the previous plan was that it relied too much on TDOT money. 

Edited by MLBrumby
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29 minutes ago, MLBrumby said:

Buses can be used inside the loop.

LRT (if that ever gets the green light) can go along other public rights of way (e.g. Hayes Street to Grundy Street with a stop at Rosa Parks). Nashville getting close to missing that boat! Of course, they missed COMPLETELY being able to buy enough land in SoBro for a transit stop. I mean, who wouldn't have seen a convention center transit hub being essential for any transit plan? The (lack of) foresight of Nashville officials is appalling.

So do you think Nashville officials should just give up on transit? Some people do. 

I also think part of the failure of the previous plan was that it relied too much on TDOT money. 

No, As a matter of facy when Cooper is elected and he will be, he is planning on having a transit plan released during his first year. Now that the Governor seems to be open to changing the state law to keep funds from being used for cities, there could be movement. People are getting  upset, but most of themm are commuters from outside the county.

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4 minutes ago, MLBrumby said:

So do you think Nashville officials should just give up on transit? Some people do. 

No, no, not saying that.    We absolutely need to address transit and I want to see the next mayor be proactive on it.     Just saying the lesson learned for Nashville is if you're going to go bold and put something to the voters, the mayor and council will have to do a better job of making the case and singing off the same sheet.      You'll recall when Barry rolled out her plan, Council was caught off guard.   Many said they hadn't even seen the plan ahead of time and weren't in a position to help sell it to their constituents.    As a result, you had some council members for it and others taking issue with different parts of it.         

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17 minutes ago, smeagolsfree said:

No, As a matter of facy when Cooper is elected and he will be, he is planning on having a transit plan released during his first year. 

Has he been doing the amount research, community input like the last plan or is he going to crib most of the current plan. Did he think there was too much research with the last plan? 

Maybe he can get buy-in from the outer portions of the county because of his focus on “neighborhoods” (still don’t know what that means), because if the red ring around downtown doesn’t vote for it it’s not gonna happen again. 

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