Jump to content

TopTenn

The Transportation and Mass Transit Megathread

Recommended Posts


If it is going to be bus heavy, then it is a lose/lose for all involved. Streets are already clogged and busses will make it worse. Busses is what I have heard.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 2
  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, smeagolsfree said:

If it is going to be bus heavy, then it is a lose/lose for all involved. Streets are already clogged and busses will make it worse. Busses is what I have heard.

Exactly. We’ll need dedicated lanes along the major roads or this isn’t going to do anything to help. 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We need dedicated lanes and a straight shot from the airport to downtown. I really hope this administration doesn’t kick this down the road. We need to start. And I don’t mean more buses.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

14 minutes ago, nashwatcher said:

We need dedicated lanes and a straight shot from the airport to downtown. I really hope this administration doesn’t kick this down the road. We need to start. And I don’t mean more buses.

If rail is too expensive, give me the last transit plan with dedicated ROW for BRT instead of rail with a line down West End, please. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, downtownresident said:

If rail is too expensive, give me the last transit plan with dedicated ROW for BRT instead of rail with a line down West End, please. 

I hope I'm wrong, but I'll be shocked if we get anything more than a modest increase in non-dedicated ROW bus service.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I'd love to be optimistic here, but I just cannot see someone like Cooper providing us with anything more than a half-assed band-aid on a gunshot wound on a paper thin budget type of solution.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, AronG said:

Meanwhile, Atlanta has seen the light and is adopting a $27B transit expansion plan including heavy rail, light rail, expanded bus service, and sidewalk upgrades:

https://atlanta.curbed.com/2019/12/16/21023213/atlanta-atl-marta-gdot-transit-expansion

I stayed near the BeltLine a few months back, and for my money it's the most interesting project in American urban development in decades.

We're currently somewhere around the population Atlanta was 40 years ago. What can we learn from them? They spent decades building enormous interstates that just served to spread everybody out so they could sit in bigger traffic jams. Here's hoping we can avoid at least some of that pointless endeavor and skip ahead to the part where we put our money towards more efficient and pleasant ways to move people around.

Amen to that... designing not just a city but an entire region around automobile travel exclusively truly is a dead end street.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, BnaBreaker said:

Amen to that... designing not just a city but an entire region around automobile travel exclusively truly is a dead end street.

If only the powers that be will let it die

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, AronG said:

Meanwhile, Atlanta has seen the light and is adopting a $27B transit expansion plan including heavy rail, light rail, expanded bus service, and sidewalk upgrades:

https://atlanta.curbed.com/2019/12/16/21023213/atlanta-atl-marta-gdot-transit-expansion

I stayed near the BeltLine a few months back, and for my money it's the most interesting project in American urban development in decades.

We're currently somewhere around the population Atlanta was 40 years ago. What can we learn from them? They spent decades building enormous interstates that just served to spread everybody out so they could sit in bigger traffic jams. Here's hoping we can avoid at least some of that pointless endeavor and skip ahead to the part where we put our money towards more efficient and pleasant ways to move people around.

One reason that this transit expansion plan, in the making for a number of years, has become so foremost of an accomplishment in its own right is that public trust became heavily eroded during relatively recent past mayoral terms in Atlanta, in particular the Campbell administration from the mid-1990s through the early 2000s.  This alienated and polarized sentiment, not only with existing governance of the City of Atlanta and shared with Fulton and Dekalb counties, but it ramified regionally to all outlying counties within Greater Atlanta, and crippling the chances of expansion beyond the now relatively meager coverage.  Five years ago, Clayton County finally passed a sales tax to join MARTA.  Highly populated Gwinnett and Cobb counties so far had refused to join or fund MARTA

MARTA is the largest public transport agency in the U.S. to never receive operational funding from the hosting state.  With a few pivotal "Rough Rides" financially between the 2008 Great Recession and around 2015, MARTA had been on its own, with little if any hope of expansion of the existing heavy rail network, the most recent being the Red Line extension of the North Line to Dunwoody in 1996 and farther out to North Springs in 2000.  This new plan gets nearly everybody onboard ─ a true "consortium, for a change ─ including Gwinnett County, the state, and the Fed.  Cobb County corridor planning remains ongoing, and to date I don't believe Cobb County has actually joined.

The plan is a projected 30-year (2021-2050) initiative.  The existing Atlanta Streetcar opened in 2014, currently only in the form of a Downtown Loop and which has been dubbed the Streetcar named Nowhere, was taken control of during 2018.   As a streetcar, it is to become integrated into the proposed larger MARTA Light Rail plan for the Beltline LRT and Clifton Corridor LRT.  As such the current streetcar technology will have to be transformed into LRT design standards which incorporates higher speed and safety requirement, as well as scalable length of trains.  MARTA HRT (heavy rail transport) definitely and finally is to be extended.

Edited by rookzie
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, rookzie said:

I'd like to give a try, ML, but I just don't have the connections, especially since I didn't crony the coat-tails of the election campaign.  The time couldn't be more aligned, since I just graduated from Lipscomb last weekend.

Congrats, Rookzie!!   

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nashville ranked 25th most expensive city in U.S. (out of Top 50) for annual commuter costs at an average of $7,774 per commuter. Average commute time estimated at 29 minutes, 45 seconds.  

More at NBJ here:

https://www.bizjournals.com/nashville/news/2019/12/03/how-nashvilles-commuting-cost-compares-to-other.html?iana=hpmvp_nsh_news_headline

Full report here:
 
https://www.listwithclever.com/real-estate-blog/best-and-worst-metros-for-commuters/?utm_campaign=covered-commuting-v1
It's crazy to consider that both Nashville and Atlanta have longer average commute times than Los Angeles, which is what you stereotypically hear as being the worst.

Sent from my GM1915 using Tapatalk

  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.