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Houston just saw a major transportation project opening, 10.3 miles of new toll lanes that were added to highway 288, a major route out of the city into Brazoria County toward Lake Jackson. The Houston area toll roads include Beltway 8 Tollway that circles the city, the Hardy Toll Road running north, roughly parallel to I-45, the Fort Bend Tollway that serves the southwest quadrant out into Fort Bend County, and toll lanes on I-10 west toward Katy, the Westpark Tollway, and the Grand Parkway (a partial ring road).

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There was another couple of articles in the NBJ. It was a both side of the coin approach, as Charles Robert Bone Pro and Joe Scarlett Con shared their views.  The one comment Scarlett proposed wa

Well....those "clueless people" happened to do over 100 town halls (attended by over 10,000 people) and a tremendous amount of research in putting that proposal together that many folks happen to thin

The land bridge to which markhollin has referred was  formally proposed in 2016 by Metro, as a component of the  Gateway to Heritage Walking Improvements initiative.   This particular land bridge woul

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17 hours ago, smeagolsfree said:

Sure would like to hang the fellow or fellows that got rid of our street cars. They didnt know what they were doing at the time.

Were cars able to drive over and on the rails at that time? if yes, imagine what Nashville would be if we just decommissioned the streetcars back then instead of also removing the rails :(

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7 minutes ago, nashvylle said:

Were cars able to drive over and on the rails at that time? if yes, imagine what Nashville would be if we just decommissioned the streetcars back then instead of also removing the rails :(

I'm guessing that like so many cities, the rails are still there imbedded in brick streets that are now covered by multiple layers of asphalt. 

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17 minutes ago, nashvylle said:

Were cars able to drive over and on the rails at that time? if yes, imagine what Nashville would be if we just decommissioned the streetcars back then instead of also removing the rails :(

Yes, I think the cars were able to drive in the same lanes and along the tracks.

 

8 minutes ago, markhollin said:

I'm guessing that like so many cities, the rails are still there imbedded in brick streets that are now covered by multiple layers of asphalt. 

Many of the rails were taken up for scrap during the war effort, but a lot still remain.

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I think because he's already campaigning for reelection. Or he's completely tone-deaf when it comes to reading his support, or lack thereof.  I have not yet looked at the proposal, but I'd expect that he was trying to throw a bone to certain areas of town with transit options. 

Your comment is well-placed. Because if he didn't already know he has minimal support from the Metro Council, he ought to know that now. 

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On 11/19/2020 at 8:46 PM, donNdonelson2 said:

Houston just saw a major transportation project opening, 10.3 miles of new toll lanes that were added to highway 288, a major route out of the city into Brazoria County toward Lake Jackson. The Houston area toll roads include Beltway 8 Tollway that circles the city, the Hardy Toll Road running north, roughly parallel to I-45, the Fort Bend Tollway that serves the southwest quadrant out into Fort Bend County, and toll lanes on I-10 west toward Katy, the Westpark Tollway, and the Grand Parkway (a partial ring road).

No state is better than Texas when it comes to building new roads and doing that in a reasonably quick manner. Puts TDOT with their endless studies and pay-as-you-go approach which keeps projects languishing for decades. I think it seems they take forever to give the politicians time to buy all the surrounding property.

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The politicians in this state are deathly afraid of those two words... Toll Roads. Even though the concept is approved, no one has had the guts to allow one to be built in this state.

I wish they would charge people to drive in the HOV lanes. You do it by camera and anyone caught in the lane during those hours of volume would be sent a bill. That would show the snobs driving in from Rutherford, Wilson, and Williamson Counties that they are not too good to pay. 

It is done in Atlanta and Charlotte along with countless other cities, but I wish the as I have said before those lanes would be taken away and replaced with rail. Then they would either be forced to drive like the regular Joe Schmo in traffic or take mass transit.

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7 hours ago, rookzie said:

Yes, they remain beneath the thick sub-grade of Belmont Blvd between Portland and Gale.  Occasionally they "pop" up elsewhere, such as along upper Jefferson Street (near 27th Ave.).  Around the time I got my driver's license (1967) many segments of street rail were still exposed downtown before being removed.  I specifically recall a sweeping curved section at 8th Ave (Spruce St.) and B'way.  It had full girder (flanged) rail and cobblestone exposed in the pavement.

Would it be possible via minor digging to uncover these tracks and have some streetcars in Belmont/Jefferson as a test?

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On 12/9/2020 at 7:06 AM, nashvylle said:

This Tennessean headline is very misleading, even though the article itself seems pretty on point. Nowhere in the article does it describe Councilmembers "gutting" the transportation plan. It's been remedied somewhat by an edited headline - now when you click the link, the word "Gutted" has been replaced with with "Slammed."

I guess a headline reading "Council Voices Legitimate Concerns" doesn't pack much of a punch.

It's true the plan does rely heavily on "opportunistic finding" such as grants, but with the city's budget issues being what they are, the immediate options seem pretty limited. Nashville is one of the only metroplitan areas without dedicated fuding for transit. Whenever we finally get around to approving that, it will help the city's annual budget process, because transit will not be competing with schools, police, etc for funding.

In the current Transportation Plan, there is a proposal to seek dedicated funding for transit some time between 2023 and 2026. This is on a timeline image on page 157. By the time 2023 rolls around, and there's another movement towards dedicated fiunding, we will hopefully have the pandemic in the rearview mirror, and we'll have an even better idea of what the city needs transportation-wise.

In the meantime, the Metro Council should have time to continue contributing feedback to make the plan better, and it looks like that is becoming the case. The best response to the plan that I've seen is from Walk/Bike Nashville, so here's a link to that:

https://www.walkbikenashville.org/mayor_cooper_s_transportation_plan

A few highlights:

  1. Equity and Meaningful Community Engagement. Equity should be embedded in the prioritization and selection of projects in a way that is transparent to everyone. As the plan is written now, we have concerns about how and if equity will be central to the selection and implementation of projects. In its current iteration, the plan is so broad most community members cannot give meaningful feedback that is specific to their experiences. 
  2. Departmental Staffing Levels. Staffing levels at departments responsible for transportation, especially at Metro Public Works and Metro Planning, are at all time low.
  3. Goals with Measurable Outcomes, Timelines and Funding. 
    While we applaud the broad goals included in the plan; the plan lacks specific measurable outcomes that will help us understand progress toward those goals. Without a funding plan with identified dedicated revenue sources, we have real doubts about how elements of this plan will ever move forward.

 

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On 11/30/2020 at 12:50 PM, smeagolsfree said:

nashvylle

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THIS IS IN RESPONSE TO A POST ON ANOTHER THREAD.
  2 hours ago, smeagolsfree said:

a  massive revamp of the inner interstate loop.

What does this mean, exactly? 

It is a travesty in its current form and function and has to be fixed. It is pretty much the same design it was when it was built back in the 50s with a few improvements here and there. Basically it is the south loop that has to be fixed along with all of the interstate bridges that are too short, too narrow and are of a bad design. 

One way to fix this is to double deck the interstate on the south loop with through traffic either above or below with no exits. This would include all truck traffic. Revamp truckers curve, the scene of so many wrecks due to bad design as well.

All interstate interchanges need to be overhauled so there is no crisscrossing of traffic. It is confusing, dangerous and the person that came up with the design should be hung in effigy. The best example is below.

Another element would be to fix the Cluster that is the stretch that runs from the I24/40 spilt east of town into and out of downtown.  You have two major interstates that have just under two mile to switch from two lanes over to the other two lanes. What were they thinking?  

Some of that could be fixed if they rerouted I 24 onto Briley, eight lane the portion between  the current I 24 to the current 8 lane section of Briley, then extending Briley to continue at the current I 24 SE of the current I 24 - 40 split. Then all of the I 24 traffic through downtown is eliminated.

I'd rather we spent the money on transit.

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Me too, however I don't think it will happen in my lifetime now. Nashville will continue to fall behind other cities as far as mass transit goes because we do not and have not had an HONORABLE  mayor with any sense and courage to come up with a plan that is both good and phased in.

The current may wants to put a band-aide on a severed limb and the previous mayor wanted to throw all the eggs into a glass basket at one time and drop from a 30 story building to see if it would break. The mayor before that tried to sneak a plan through with out any consultation or public input. A behind the doors plan so to speak.

Metro has spent so much money on plans and studies they could have funded the first leg of a rail system somewhere,

My guess as I have said before is Cooper is a one term mayor as folks are really upset about the tax increase and still a lack of transparency in spending. He was still trying to spend money  they didnt have on the park in Bells Bend.

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