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Since Nashville does not have a typical beltway around the north of the city, it will need the Interstates through the city to be kept and widened.  Getting beyond the core, they're actually quite wide and nice.  So widening the downtown segments shouldn't add a whole lot to the sprawl, which continues unabated around Nashville. 

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Well....those "clueless people" happened to do over 100 town halls (attended by over 10,000 people) and a tremendous amount of research in putting that proposal together that many folks happen to thin

There was another couple of articles in the NBJ. It was a both side of the coin approach, as Charles Robert Bone Pro and Joe Scarlett Con shared their views.  The one comment Scarlett proposed wa

The land bridge to which markhollin has referred was  formally proposed in 2016 by Metro, as a component of the  Gateway to Heritage Walking Improvements initiative.   This particular land bridge woul

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37 minutes ago, KJHburg said:

I drove up today from the NW suburbs of Atlanta to Nashville and the truck traffic on that corridor is unbelievable and quite heavy as it rolls into Nashville.  Why can't Briley Parkway being upgraded to interstate standards from I-24 around east side of Nashville on its existing route and connect back to I-24 and have this route designated I-24 to get some of this truck traffic out of downtown?  It seems like there is only a few stretches not a freeway now but designated this as an interstate could divert most of that through truck traffic out of your downtown. 

It seems like this was almost another inner beltway.    Nashville has grown into a major metro area whether you like it or not but the congestion is getting worse and worse it seems and not much is happening on the transportation front.   I still think Bus Rapid Trail and commuter rail need to get started and quick and eventually light rail.  

And promoting this new Briley I-24 loop with the trucking industry could get these Midwest to Southeast trucks out of downtown especially if I-840 is never going to built north of I-40. 

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Yep.

And utilizing Briley Parkway in either direction requires going through a mind-boggling dogleg steep cloverleaf. As truck - unfriendly as it gets and renders Briley Parkway useless

And then, there's the Briley/I-24 interchange on the north side, built to modern 1932 standards with its 15mph speed limit

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8 hours ago, LA_TN said:

Yep.

And utilizing Briley Parkway in either direction requires going through a mind-boggling dogleg steep cloverleaf. As truck - unfriendly as it gets and renders Briley Parkway useless

And then, there's the Briley/I-24 interchange on the north side, built to modern 1932 standards with its 15mph speed limit

Yep, the is the kicker. If they fix that section of 155, then it is the answer to the truck traffic problem. I will say that when traffic is back to normal, Briley  can be a parking lot both directions at rush hour. It will require 8 lanes from I 65 back around to I 40 and White Bridge/Charlotte. I live on that end of town and use to have to drive it at rush hour and there were times it was not fun at all and that was 10 years ago. 

If you add the truck traffic, then you have to add the lanes and the enhanced interchanges.

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The politicians in this state do not have the willpower to fix Nashville traffic woes because all of the Podunk counties will be jealous that Nashville is getting all of the gas tax money. They want the money for roads to their trailer parks fixed first. 

They also passed the law to allow for toll roads, but none have done one. No political will power there either.

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22 minutes ago, smeagolsfree said:

The politicians in this state do not have the willpower to fix Nashville traffic woes because all of the Podunk counties will be jealous that Nashville is getting all of the gas tax money. They want the money for roads to their trailer parks fixed first. 

They also passed the law to allow for toll roads, but none have done one. No political will power there either.

The Podunk counties would benefit from 840 north as it would spur economic growth in those counties along its corridor. It would also make those counties more attractive for commuters to live in as truck traffic would be diverted around Nashville and thus make for a safer and quicker commute into Nashville.

840 south was originally sold as an economic growth engine.

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The bidding process for a private partner to upgrade and run the city's on-street parking meters has begun

Mayor John Cooper's administration wants to upgrade Nashville's largely coin-operated meters with a user-friendly system to increase compliance. The scope of any future deal will focus on the 725 meters downtown and 975 meters in the Midtown and Vanderbilt area. There won't be an expansion or changes to rates and hours of enforcement. At least not initially.

More at The Tennessean here:

https://www.tennessean.com/story/news/politics/2021/04/21/nashville-opens-bidding-parking-meter-contract/7284298002/

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41 minutes ago, markhollin said:

The bidding process for a private partner to upgrade and run the city's on-street parking meters has begun

Mayor John Cooper's administration wants to upgrade Nashville's largely coin-operated meters with a user-friendly system to increase compliance. The scope of any future deal will focus on the 725 meters downtown and 975 meters in the Midtown and Vanderbilt area. There won't be an expansion or changes to rates and hours of enforcement. At least not initially.

More at The Tennessean here:

https://www.tennessean.com/story/news/politics/2021/04/21/nashville-opens-bidding-parking-meter-contract/7284298002/

Considering the fact that there’s practically NO enforcement of metered parking now, I hope this move will mean that on street metered parking will become the SHORT TERM parking option that it should be going forward. (A midday walk downtown always reveals most meters flashing the “expired” indicator.)

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On 4/16/2021 at 3:56 PM, smeagolsfree said:

The politicians in this state do not have the willpower to fix Nashville traffic woes because all of the Podunk counties will be jealous that Nashville is getting all of the gas tax money. They want the money for roads to their trailer parks fixed first. 

They also passed the law to allow for toll roads, but none have done one. No political will power there either.

  Knowing so many people in he Podunk counties and many of their reasons for living there I have elected to delete my comment 3 times before leaving this one.

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Premier Parking has announced new checkout-free mobile technology. It is first being used in Nashville, with plans to expand to all Premier sites over the coming months.

The proprietary technology was created by Metropolis and is billed as an “AI-powered autonomous commerce platform built to modernize parking and empower the future of mobility.”

With the app, customers get can pay for parking at any of the new Metropolis-driven locations across Nashville. Once enrolled, each time a customer pulls into an enabled location, computer vision technology immediately detects a customer’s arrival and triggers a text message confirming the start of her or his parking session. When finished, customers are charged for the exact duration of their stay, eliminating the need for looking for payment kiosks, getting ticketed for expired time or paying for more time than they used.

Subscription parking and validated parking will also be improved, with the scan of a QR code or a phone tap granting weekly and monthly access.

More behind the Nashville Post paywall here:

https://www.nashvillepost.com/business/technology/of-note-23-april-2021/article_898ed2c4-a3ba-11eb-9d1a-ff9163cf6409.html

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On 4/21/2021 at 8:34 AM, markhollin said:

The bidding process for a private partner to upgrade and run the city's on-street parking meters has begun

Mayor John Cooper's administration wants to upgrade Nashville's largely coin-operated meters with a user-friendly system to increase compliance. The scope of any future deal will focus on the 725 meters downtown and 975 meters in the Midtown and Vanderbilt area. There won't be an expansion or changes to rates and hours of enforcement. At least not initially.

More at The Tennessean here:

https://www.tennessean.com/story/news/politics/2021/04/21/nashville-opens-bidding-parking-meter-contract/7284298002/

I'm curious how this will go, I would guess without demand-based pricing it will be less appealing to private partners. Politically, I wonder if it would be better to implement that now and bundle all the unpopular stuff together because increased enforcement is going to generate a ton of ill will no matter what.

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On 4/16/2021 at 3:56 PM, smeagolsfree said:

They also passed the law to allow for toll roads, but none have done one. No political will power there either.

The trick with Toll Roads is we would have to go through the federal government to place tolls on the Interstates. Tolls can be added to "Hot Lanes" (think HOV on steroids), but building tolling facilities on existing highways is hard and a very laborous process. The Trump administration tried to allow tolls on Interstates through their infrastructure bill, but it's the federal government. The most recent tolling adventure I had heard of was the RI Truck Toll where the state built tolls on I-95, but it was isolated to trucks above a certain axle count only. I know the trucking organizations all sued for discrimination, but I dont know what happened beyond that. 

Because Nashville (and even TN as a whole) highways are all interstates, I tend to doubt we will ever see tolling on the interstates. One thing that some bigger cities play around with is a "Congestion Fee" which is essentially a toll, but it is more centralized around very dense areas. I belive London has one. There has been chatter in certain circles for years in Boston that they could utilize one (they have been ranked worst traffic multiple times sadly), but I do not believe any city in the US has such a fee.

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Route 840 would have been a perfect example of a toll road option along with the extension if they had decided to do the northern route. The southern route was not an Interstate until recently. Another option would be for the state to build another toll bypass around the northern part of Davidson from Kentucky instead of making I 24 8 lanes. They would be able to pay for another road that way and that could be the way the state pays for new roads around Nashville if the state insist on building more roads. Those would be state roads and not Interstates, much like beltway 8 was in Texas around Houston.

There are always options to bypass the state. Ky & In  were able to make the new I 65 over the OHIO a toll bridge with not much of an issue.

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On 5/6/2021 at 2:11 PM, Bos2Nash said:

The trick with Toll Roads is we would have to go through the federal government to place tolls on the Interstates. Tolls can be added to "Hot Lanes" (think HOV on steroids), but building tolling facilities on existing highways is hard and a very laborous process. The Trump administration tried to allow tolls on Interstates through their infrastructure bill, but it's the federal government. The most recent tolling adventure I had heard of was the RI Truck Toll where the state built tolls on I-95, but it was isolated to trucks above a certain axle count only. I know the trucking organizations all sued for discrimination, but I dont know what happened beyond that. 

Because Nashville (and even TN as a whole) highways are all interstates, I tend to doubt we will ever see tolling on the interstates. One thing that some bigger cities play around with is a "Congestion Fee" which is essentially a toll, but it is more centralized around very dense areas. I belive London has one. There has been chatter in certain circles for years in Boston that they could utilize one (they have been ranked worst traffic multiple times sadly), but I do not believe any city in the US has such a fee.

This past March the U.S. DOT gave New York State the OK to proceed with a federally required Environmental Assessment and public outreach for New York City's conceptual congesting-pricing plan in Manhattan.  The State itself approved a plan in 2019.

However New York's plan is different from what you're speaking of  ─ the interstates ─ and instead is zonal, with certain exemptions for residents and for those with income below a threshold.  So far I've heard of no interstate-designated expressway yet implemented in a domestic congestion-pricing arrangement.  I think New York's zone plan is to become the first, while L.A. is set to follow suit.  I expect L.A. to aim for an expressway-based plan, just as Atlanta's demonstration set-up was in 2012-'13.

But then Atlanta's plan, designated a "Congestion Reduction Demonstration", was not what I consider a true "Congestion-Pricing" set-up, even with HOT lanes, because general-purpose lanes remain free, instead of all lanes having some variable pricing.   The Atlanta demo  included a transit component integrated with the HOT lane ─  a batch of new commuter coach buses and a sizable addition of park-and-ride spaces along a stretch of I-85 and along other segments of the trial.   Arguably, this transit element can become somewhat of an attractive commuting alternative, so long as a car is not needed at one end of the personal trip.  Then too, "Congestion Reduction" might have been a misnomer, because such managed set-ups don't necessarily reduce congestion.

Rather, HOT lanes and true Congestion-Pricing may "regulate" rates of movement (with automation-assistive enforcement) by inducement of tiered usage  at periods of high occupancy, thereby monetizing the cost of personal value of time as a commodity.  In this respect, their fundamental usefulness, aside from government fund-raising, remains academic.  One thing that can be said about the desired effect of Congestive Pricing is that it works best in conjunction with some form of existing alternative parallel point-to-point Rapid Bus or higher-capacity rapid transit with relatively high frequency of service.  By itself, Congestion Pricing tends to be highly regressive to those who must consume a high proportion of personal income to commute, but measures can be undertaken to offset that sense of disparity.   As a disincentive to driving in the most congested areas at the most congested times, at least in theory it may be the least socially inequitable way of managing traffic.

Edited by rookzie
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Dont get me wrong, toll roads can go too far. I know the central Florida area has way too many toll roads and folks there probably spend a thousand bucks a year on tolls. I say they can be used as alternatives to alleviate traffic congestion on main arteries for the folks who are willing to pay to get to their destination faster.

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On 4/16/2021 at 11:43 AM, bnacincy said:

840 north loop

Is dead. Not happening. We'll need some other option to help alleviate congestion. As mentioned before, I support transit and oppose additional interstate widenings.

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