Rural King

MSA South - Williamson & Rutherford Counties

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17 minutes ago, BnaBreaker said:

Great space that will be used by zero people.

Consider that space beautifully landscaped rainwater runoff (flood) control. Management of storm drainage is an important part of development and this one makes it look very nice!

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4 hours ago, BnaBreaker said:

Great space that will be used by zero people.

You're so Skept-Tickle. :D I'll drive over and use it just to make sure they get their money's worth.

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A Florida-based provider of medical answering services plans this month to open a location in Spring Hill that will house roughly 200 call center agents and triage nurses.

The 15,000-square-foot facility at the Workforce Development & Conference Center at Northfield will be the third business location for Delray Beach-based Call 4 Health, which also operates a cell center in Linthicum Heights, Maryland.


http://www.tennessean.com/story/money/real-estate/2017/10/02/florida-medical-call-center-operator-bringing-200-jobs-spring-hill/723563001/

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Article on NP site about new high density developments going up in WillCo. Mentioned are the massive Bigby by Crescent and Northside by Boyle projects... http://www.nashvillepost.com/business/nashville-post-magazine/article/20978222/real-density-comes-to-cool-springs

This excerpt compares the Northside project to the existing Southside project, also by Boyle.

 The much larger Northside, though, will hug an extended Aspen Grove Drive with almost 800,000 square feet of office space in seven buildings as well as 580 residential units — while featuring no fewer than five garages with about 4,500 spaces. 

Crescent's Bigby pictured: 

Cool Springs.jpg

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I'm staying with some family in Franklin right now while the wife and I are waiting to close on our new home in Madison, and from what I've gathered from people around town I've talked to there is a lot of irritation about this project. Mainly adding to traffic issues, considering that intersection on Franklin road is one of the worst in the area. Honestly it's just nimby nonsense. The hotel is much needed in the area, 150 condos will barely register on the traffic scale, and they'll be happy that there's more retail offerings outside of cool springs. Plus the big parking garage will be appreciated. 

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4 hours ago, Pdt2f said:

I'm staying with some family in Franklin right now while the wife and I are waiting to close on our new home in Madison, and from what I've gathered from people around town I've talked to there is a lot of irritation about this project. Mainly adding to traffic issues, considering that intersection on Franklin road is one of the worst in the area. Honestly it's just nimby nonsense. The hotel is much needed in the area, 150 condos will barely register on the traffic scale, and they'll be happy that there's more retail offerings outside of cool springs. Plus the big parking garage will be appreciated. 

That attitude irritates me so much... the notion that progress and development in the community should essentially be indefinitely halted because I might have to spend three more minutes per year in traffic.  

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5 hours ago, BnaBreaker said:

That attitude irritates me so much... the notion that progress and development in the community should essentially be indefinitely halted because I might have to spend three more minutes per year in traffic.  

Agreed. I mean, if the project they had planned there was absurd and put an undue burden on the local population, I'd understand. Like if they planned a fertilizer plant or if amazon decided to put their hq on that piece of land and have 50,000 workers leaving every day (ha), I would agree with their complaints. But this project seems designed to fit into the downtown Franklin vibe through and through. Plus people always complain about parking (even though there's a free garage across from St. Phillips on 4th avenue) and there is plenty in this project. 

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1 hour ago, Pdt2f said:

Agreed. I mean, if the project they had planned there was absurd and put an undue burden on the local population, I'd understand. Like if they planned a fertilizer plant or if amazon decided to put their hq on that piece of land and have 50,000 workers leaving every day (ha), I would agree with their complaints. But this project seems designed to fit into the downtown Franklin vibe through and through. Plus people always complain about parking (even though there's a free garage across from St. Phillips on 4th avenue) and there is plenty in this project. 

Totally agreed.  Obviously there is a line... developers shouldn't just be able to put anything anywhere, but like you said, this project is perfectly scaled, and provides a lot of services that downtown Franklin actually needs, so I'm excited about this one.  

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^Should rue the day that went up, that helped to deliver the death blow to Hickory Hollow Mall and Antioch. As a lifelong resident, I can say without hesitation things were better in my neighborhood 30 years ago than they are today. :(

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5 hours ago, fieldmarshaldj said:

^Should rue the day that went up, that helped to deliver the death blow to Hickory Hollow Mall and Antioch. As a lifelong resident, I can say without hesitation things were better in my neighborhood 30 years ago than they are today. :(

Not only that, but look at all of the once pristine wilderness areas and farmlands that are now mostly unused asphalt lots.

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2 hours ago, BnaBreaker said:

Not only that, but look at all of the once pristine wilderness areas and farmlands that are now mostly unused asphalt lots.

Look at those beautiful old home lots in the downtown core that are now asphalt lots.

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1 hour ago, titanhog said:

Look at those beautiful old home lots in the downtown core that are now asphalt lots.

Those too!  I think it's high time we stop destroying things of value, whether natural or man-made, in order to make a place to put one's personal transport while they're doing hot yoga or eating ribs... or... both at the same time... ????  Hmmm... business idea!!

Edited by BnaBreaker
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5 hours ago, Pdt2f said:

Well to those of us who lived and were raised in Williamson county, as I was, cool springs and it’s growth was a Godsend. Not much wilderness in Middle Tennessee is virgin growth, so the pristine wilderness you see isn’t really more than scrub. Without cool springs and the benefits it gives to Williamson county downtown Franklin wouldn’t have experienced the resurgence it did, and it would have dilapidated just like towns like Pulaski have. The value of land is kind of based on what is needed. At the time the area had plenty of farmland and secondary forest growth, and sill does. What they lacked and needed was retail space, office space, and room for more housing. 

That's totally fair.  And to be clear, I don't really have a problem with Cool Springs itself as much as I have a problem with the way it was built.  I mean, I get it, it was the nineties and sprawl was in.  Cool Springs is pretty much par for the course in terms of suburban development at that time.  It would have been abnormal for it not to have been developed the way it was.  But I still wish, ideally, that the area was populated with a bit more care and concern for the natural beauty that represents a big part of the reason people enjoy living in the Nashville region in the first place.  I think it's entirely possible for us to get the things we want AND be good stewards of the environment.  It appears that, hopefully, that attitude is starting to change.  Fingers crossed!!

Edited by BnaBreaker

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47 minutes ago, BnaBreaker said:

That's totally fair.  And to be clear, I don't really have a problem with Cool Springs itself as much as I have a problem with the way it was built.  I mean, I get it, it was the nineties and sprawl was in.  Cool Springs is pretty much par for the course in terms of suburban development at that time.  It would have been abnormal for it not to have been developed the way it was.  But I still wish, ideally, that the area was populated with a bit more care and concern for the natural beauty that represents a big part of the reason people enjoy living in the Nashville region in the first place.  I think it's entirely possible for us to get the things we want AND be good stewards of the environment.  It appears that, hopefully, that attitude is starting to change.  Fingers crossed!!

Oh I think one of the reasons CoolSprings is so popular is precisely because it does coexist with the natural beauty of the area.  Not everyone wants to live and work in urban high rises.  I like that the roads in CoolSprings follow the hilly and curvy contours of the land.  I like that the low-rise office buildings don't overshadow the hills and are built in park-like settings.  I like that Nashville has such an attractive area as CoolSprings.  While I, personally, would never live in such an area, suburbia is clearly still wildly popular.  I enjoy visiting CoolSprings and am glad we have it.

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I fail to see how any of the above are examples of "natural beauty"... nothing very natural about landscaped lawns and shrubbery... and who said anything about living in highrises?

Edited by BnaBreaker

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2 hours ago, jmtunafish said:

Oh I think one of the reasons CoolSprings is so popular is precisely because it does coexist with the natural beauty of the area.  Not everyone wants to live and work in urban high rises.  I like that the roads in CoolSprings follow the hilly and curvy contours of the land.  I like that the low-rise office buildings don't overshadow the hills and are built in park-like settings.  I like that Nashville has such an attractive area as CoolSprings.  While I, personally, would never live in such an area, suburbia is clearly still wildly popular.  I enjoy visiting CoolSprings and am glad we have 

That is the beauty of cool springs, even on the top floor of the CHS headquarters, all you could really see was trees, and even the buildings you DID see blended in so well you hardly noticed!

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1 hour ago, BnaBreaker said:

I fail to see how any of the above are examples of "natural beauty"... and who said anything about living in highrises?

I think landscaped beauty is probably more apt, but there are great views of hills surrounding all of the development. 

I've defended Cool Springs on here before, but I really do think it isn't as bad as many around here say. As far as suburbia goes, its pretty much the best you could ask for. 

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