Rural King

MSA North & East - Montgomery, Sumner, and Wilson Counties

766 posts in this topic

Welcome to the new Clarksville Urban Discussion Thread! This thread is here for everyone interested in posting and discussing news and urban developments for Tennessee's 5th largest city.

New Members are encouraged to join and participate in this thread to help foster the traffic and interest in Clarksville related urban discussions. The more members we have from and/or discussing Clarksville will help enable UP to one day potentially establish a dedicated sub-forum for the city. So participation on a regular basis is vital! :)

Enjoy!!!

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Ironically, Clarksville is in the middle of a re-branding campaign right now. So, "Gateway" may be replaced with a new slogan soon.

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Two medical related firms have announced a new 22,000 sq/ft joint facility neat the new Medical District in Clarksville. Renderings and more information are contained within the Leaf-Chronical article that can be read by clicking here.

The article's rendering shows a nice clean modern two story structure that should fit in well with the sort of modern medical facilities and offices probably aslo destined to locate in that area as infill starts to develop around the new hospital. It would be great if some locals could elaborate on what is going on out there with the new medical distirct, hospital, etc., as I know absolutely no specifics of what's planned for the area.

Ironically, Clarksville is in the middle of a re-branding campaign right now. So, "Gateway" may be replaced with a new slogan soon.

Have any alternatives been mentioned as possible replacements?

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It would be great if some locals could elaborate on what is going on out there with the new medical distirct, hospital, etc., as I know absolutely no specifics of what's planned for the area.

The new Gateway Medical Center is set to open in April with two adjacent five story medical office buildings to be completed by year's end.

construction_future.jpg

Also, a mix of apartment/condo residential and doctor's offices/pharmacies are already starting to sprout around the area. This is the area both east and west of Ted Crozier Blvd and between the mall area and I-24. This area has been deemed a capital improvements district, with incentives from the city for builders.

Have any alternatives been mentioned as possible replacements?

I am not sure as to what the final campaign will be. I know an agency out of Nashville is handling it.

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The new Gateway Medical Center is set to open in April with two adjacent five story medical office buildings to be completed by year's end.

construction_future.jpg

Sorry, but that design is so uninspiring, even for a hospital built twenty years ago, much less for a brand new one.

If someone can dig up a pic of the Sutter Roseville (CA) Medical Center, you will see that hospitals can -- and I argue, should -- be designed in innovative and inspiring ways. Things like skylights throughout, and corridors that run at angles, and curves at interesting focal points, and well you get the idea. I'm no architect, but I'm like most people who can appreciate when a hospital doesn't look like a hospital.

The best I could find, but it shows only the front canopy. It's designed in a prairie style (with some Spanish mission undertones)...

http://sutterroseville.org/about/directions.html#2

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Clarksville has never been a mecca for modern architectural design. However, I am at least glad that we are building for our population finally.

If I can get some photos of some of our new medical office clusters popping up around the area, I will post. Their designs are much more pleasing to the eye.

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Yeah the hospital is definitley a plain jane utilitarian structure, but like miami1855 said it's principle purpose is what matters at the end of the day and it's is good news that Clarksville is getting a new hospital facility to serve it's rapidly growing population needs.

I would definitely like to see some pics from out in that area of the city if you can take some miami1855. :)

Any news on any new projects downtown as far redevelopment of existing structures, lots, or infrastructure assets?

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With the new hospital nearby, are there any updates planned for Govorner's Square Mall? It has looked the same since it was built in the 80's.....

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With the new hospital nearby, are there any updates planned for Govorner's Square Mall? It has looked the same since it was built in the 80's.....

The mall has become the place "not to go" in Clarksville. Gangs and violence are pretty rampant in and around the mall area.

There was talk about building an entirely new mall nearby, but I don't think that was much more than talk.

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Is Governor's Place Mall really that bad? Or is it more of an impression have developed not entirely based around facts on the ground, but rather on a few high profile incidents and/or hear-say. I find many malls seem to get bad raps, esp. older ones, but often the case is much different from the bleak and scary impression one might get from some folks.

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Is Governor's Place Mall really that bad? Or is it more of an impression have developed not entirely based around facts on the ground, but rather on a few high profile incidents and/or hear-say. I find many malls seem to get bad raps, esp. older ones, but often the case is much different from the bleak and scary impression one might get from some folks.

Gov. Sq. is difficult to navigate. It's like a big dark maze on halloween night with all the "goths", "rednecks" and "ruffnecks". It's too bad that the "Sango development" never materialized.

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There is a good mix of stores at GSM. However, the mall is very outdated and somewhat difficult to navigate. There is no planned flow for traffic to navigate the mall, instead you drive "to" the mall and not around it, persay. Clarksville deserves better than this. The Sango area is gaining attention and even though the other mall did not materialize, there's bound to be something there. I just hope it's different from the many open air malls that are going up nowadays.

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There is a good mix of stores at GSM. However, the mall is very outdated and somewhat difficult to navigate. There is no planned flow for traffic to navigate the mall, instead you drive "to" the mall and not around it, persay. Clarksville deserves better than this. The Sango area is gaining attention and even though the other mall did not materialize, there's bound to be something there. I just hope it's different from the many open air malls that are going up nowadays.

The Sango area is a mystery (I must note that I live there). It has the biggest residential boom, the largest per capita income by far around Clarksville and is the closest to Nashville. Still, large-scale retail growth in that area is slow to non-existent. The Exit 11 area is a ghost town.

I think it goes along with the old Clarksville habit of building around the military. For years, businesses have thought that they would not survive unless they catered to Ft. Campbell families. However, Ft. Campbell only accounts for about 25% of Clarksville's population.

It is sad really. We deserve and could easily sustain everything that Murfreesboro and Hendersonville are getting in the Sango area. It just isn't happening. We do have a Starbucks though! <_<

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The Sango area is a mystery (I must note that I live there). It has the biggest residential boom, the largest per capita income by far around Clarksville and is the closest to Nashville. Still, large-scale retail growth in that area is slow to non-existent. The Exit 11 area is a ghost town.

I think it goes along with the old Clarksville habit of building around the military. For years, businesses have thought that they would not survive unless they catered to Ft. Campbell families. However, Ft. Campbell only accounts for about 25% of Clarksville's population.

It is sad really. We deserve and could easily sustain everything that Murfreesboro and Hendersonville are getting in the Sango area. It just isn't happening. We do have a Starbucks though! <_<

With it's proximity to the river and Riverside Drive (one of the busiest intersections in the state), I'm surprised that the Two River's Mall has not become a trendy upscale shopping and entertainment destination. I can invision an upscale Belk and Macy's anchoring the center with 50-60 upscale shops in and around the mall similar to Green Hills or Parkway Place in Huntsville. Any thoughts out there???

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Two Rivers Mall has seen somewhat of a renaissance. A new company bought the mall and did a re-facing a year or so back. The tenants as of today are...

Hooters

Cheeseburger Charley's

Harbor Freight Tools

Casablanca Mexican Restaurant

Kickers Night Club

Convergys Call Center

Surplus Warehouse

Merle Norman

Then, there is a Waffle House, Taco Bell and jewelry store on site. Not the greatest tenants, but it is a ton nicer than it used to be.

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I think this illustrates the disconnect from the size and growth of Clarksville to its commercial and retail assets. Clarksville has been large enough (on paper) to support two Lowes for years. I mean heck Jackson at only 60% of the size of Clarksville (roughly) has had a second Lowes on the southside of the city for a couple of years now - granted Jackson serves a regional commercial/retail hub. I mean I have to assume market research and sales figures must not have shown enough demand until now or they would have already been built, but I was sort of surprised to read Clarksville only has one Lowes at this time.

My only guess is that the size of the transient military population in Clarksville retards the demand for home improvement goods as they don't own homes and/or buy on base. Another factor might be Hopkinsville's Lowes, which could bleed off some of the big ticket shoppers with it's lower sales tax rate and relative easy accessability. Anybody agree or disagree that these might have been factors in the lag time of this second store being built? It's an interesting case study for us to talk about IMO.

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Another factor might be Hopkinsville's Lowes, which could bleed off some of the big ticket shoppers with it's lower sales tax rate and relative easy accessability.

It's funny you say that b/c my wife and I have bought furniture in Hopkinsville several times b/c of the lower sales tax rate. So, I definitely believe this is at least a small factor.

I have also heard rumors that Home Depot, Target, Publix and other big box stores have been looking at the Madison Street area, either in Sango or in place of the old hospital. I think they are just waiting for the first developer to pull the trigger. There is an article in the paper today stating that the city is in discussions with a developer to buy the current Clarksville Gas and Water south district building. There is also discussion about selling the current Startek building (formerly Acme Boot Co.). This would open up a retail area of about 50 acres, stretching from Richview Road to MLK Parkway.

http://theleafchronicle.com/apps/pbcs.dll/.../803040338/1002

And, speaking of Jackson, you guys had a Starbucks long before we did as well. :thumbsup:

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I read today that a downtown redevelopment plan being pursued by the City of Clarksville is seeing some stiff public opposition according to the Clarksville Leaf-Chronicle. While the city has an ambitious plan to address blight and foster redevelopmetn of its urban core and surrounding areas, local property owners are growing concerned over the plan's designation of almost the entire area as blighted and the potential use of eminent domain in attaining redevelopment aims via private 3rd-party redevelopment projects.

Is this a valid concern? The state legislature passed a tough new law on local governments that restricted their ability to use eminent domain on blighted properties for private develoment purposes in the wake of the Kelo vs. The City of New London (CT). I definitely think the city is taking the right tact in pursuing redevelopment of its historic core, but perhaps it needs to rewrite the language of the proposal to allay fears? I definitely side on protecting the rights of property owners, but is the city right on this and that the fears are over-blown?

What do others think about the plan and the fears raised by some local property owners?

Also, why didn't the Leaf-Chronicle mention the new law? It seems seems awfully relevent.

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There was an article on TV the other day about the plan and the opposition to it. Here is an article from the Tennessean today concerning this. A lot of debate for sure going on up there. I wish we had someone on the forum that went to the meeting.

http://www.tennessean.com/apps/pbcs.dll/ar...EWS02/803230411

And it didn't help matters that they held the meeting in a small elementary school cafeteria, only holding 180 according to fire codes. There were a ton of people that were denied entry into the meeting because of this. Oddly enough, the school is directly across from Austin peay, which has numerous auditoriums that could have accommodated anywhere from 250-700 people.

But, in my opinion, the plan isn't a bad thing. All of these residents feel the same way about Austin Peay, that we are going to come and take their land through eminent domain. But, that isn't the case. This plan will ensure that proper commercial and residential development is planned for the downtown area for the future, but not at the expense of current residents.

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A recent U.S. census report lists the Clarksville MSA as the 10th fastest growing in the nation. They attribute the growth, as usual, to the rise in military families moving here permanently as their final transfer.

Report:

http://theleafchronicle.com/apps/pbcs.dll/...EWS01/803270321

The MSA includes Clarksville in TN, Ft. Campbell, Oak Grove and Hopkinsville in KY.

In my opinion, while this is great news, it also reinforces the fact that the area has not developed the appropriate infrastructure and retail to keep up with the growth. And I also have a problem with the media always attributing our rapid growth to the military as they account for less than 25% of our MSA's population.

On another note, it also shows that Clarksville/Hopkinsville are further distancing themselves from Nashville, hoping to become an autonomous entity as an MSA. I see this as one of the main reasons that Nashville hasn't grown towards the NW, toward Joelton/Pleasantview/Springfield.

Thoughts?

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I already think of Clarksville as an autonomous area due to it's size and virtual complete independence from Nashville as far as factors contributing to it's growth go. I plenty of people who commute to Nashville from Clarksville, but the overall trend seems to be Lebanon, Franklin, and Murfreesboro are the larger locales of choice for commuters dependent on the city for employment but wish to live in areas outside the metro.

I think it's good for Clarksville to further create it's own seperate image as one of the state's largest cities, as that sort of marketing and positioning will only enhance it's ability to lure more economic and population growth as a city in it's own right not dependent on the economic health and/or amenities of Nashville. That being said, being less than an hour is a good selling point, but I would hope that Clarksville will reach the point where the amentities and benefits within the city proper would be the primary inducement for individuals to find the city to be a good place live, work, and do business.

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I agree fully. City and EDC leaders have said that Clarksville does not have the retail to support this growth and that they are attempting to entice more big-box stores, restaurants and entertainment venues to venture into our fair city. I hope so.

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What's going on in downtown Clarksville now a days? Any new businesses or rehabs of older structures going on?

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