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MSA North & East - Montgomery, Sumner, and Wilson Counties

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This looks like Wilson County, not Cool Springs.

 

I think that's what he means by Cool Springs "East"...

 

I was confused at first when I looked at the site plan.

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Ah ok!  When I think of Cool Springs East I think of items along McEwen and the new Franklin Park project... which they happen to be installing underground utilities now.

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Ah ok!  When I think of Cool Springs East I think of items along McEwen and the new Franklin Park project... which they happen to be installing underground utilities now.

 

That was my first thought. Then I saw the orientation of the buildings in the site plan were different. Confusion washed over me, then I thought "OH!"

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We'll see how things turn out for this development.  I definitely can see that area between Mt. Juliet and Lebanon turning into another Cool Springs.  Is this site served by the Music City Star?

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We'll see how things turn out for this development.  I definitely can see that area between Mt. Juliet and Lebanon turning into another Cool Springs.  Is this site served by the Music City Star?

 

No. This is south of 1-40. It's about 2.5 miles from the Star, though, so I think it would be wise to think about establishing a shuttle to the station, if this gets built.

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Massive Cool Springs East project is on hold until sewer is figured out.

 

http://www.tennessean.com/article/20130522/WILSON02/305220022/Massive-Bel-Air-Providence-project-remains-hold

 

"Bel Air Providence"? ...I just threw up a little bit in my mouth...can they at least attempt to make some kind of local connection of the development with the land/area? What I'm really looking forward to is Rancho Sante Fe Indian Lake...

 

 

"Guerrero believes the system could not adequately serve Bel Air Providence and that restaurants, retailers, corporate office users, apartment developers and homeowners would not invest in a development served by septic tanks."

 

Ya think? Sounds like this guy is just a tad bit patronizing...

Edited by TnNative

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I had heard that it was a go several months back. Guess work on the building is about to start. Sometimes the news repeats itself. They have been working on the site for a while now as far as excavation goes.

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Wait...redevelopment...does this mean some of those buildings are coming down??

Also...I don't know if Brentwood would want it to resemble Meridian Cool Springs (a suburban development that I actually find somewhat attractive)...anything that could be seen as urban and dense breeds crime according to Preserve Brentwood.

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I don't think anything is coming down. This has been on the books for a while and I have a first round rendering that is about a year and a half old that wraps the mansion.

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I don't think anything is coming down. This has been on the books for a while and I have a first round rendering that is about a year and a half old that wraps the mansion.

If that's the case, I'm not sure exactly what Boyle is going to do there. A hotel is nice (I have noticed a number of folks that walk commute to work -- I assume temporary work) from hotels on the east side of 65 to Brentwood (this is another time I say HEY BRENTWOOD, WOULDN'T IT BE AWESOME IF YOUNG PROFESSIONALS COULD LIVE IN APARTMENTS AND WALK TO THEIR JOBS?? WOULDN'T THAT HELP WITH...YOU KNOW...TRAFFIC??).

But the idea of creating another Meridian-style development without either tearing down buildings or adding parking garages is confusing to me. Brentwood already has ample restaurants and retail. What they don't have right in the "downtown" area can be found a few miles to the south in Cool Springs. What exactly is Boyle trying to do here?

Now I could see, if Brentwood wasn't populated by rich bumpkins and scared transplants, if Boyle wanted to buy the property, tear down or extensively remodel the buildings one by one, and create sort of a town center/downtown psuedo urban environment (like Meridian) that it would be worthwhile. A semi-urban office park, along with a hotel, and along with the adjacent Tapestry development...and the proposed-but-doomed-to-fail Streets of Brentwood (in any proposed form) would actually create a rather neat *NEW* subruban downtown.

But if he's just planning to stick some retail and a hotel on that property...it's probably going to look like a bunch of jumbled crap and really do zero for Brentwood (both from an urban design perspective, and a traffic/amenities perspective).

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40 units have been sold at the Braxton in Ashland City. Only one of the buildings is selling right now. Units in the second tower will go on the market next year at a higher price.

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Speaking of Ashland City, B&C, which stands for Bacon & Caviar catering, a barbecue restaurant and caterer located in the Farmer's Market and in the Melrose Kroger shopping center, has announed that they are opening a location in Ashland City, to be called the Ashland City Smokehouse or something like that.

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Already open, not bad but they are in cursed building. Fifth or so restaurant in that location.

 

They just haven't found the right restaurant. B&C could be it. :)

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The large new development on McEwen and Carothers kitty corner from Franklin Park will have shops, town homes and a focal point of an 8 story office building. Developed by Highwoods.

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