Jump to content

Rural King

MSA North & East - Montgomery, Sumner, and Wilson Counties

Recommended Posts

I agree fully. City and EDC leaders have said that Clarksville does not have the retail to support this growth and that they are attempting to entice more big-box stores, restaurants and entertainment venues to venture into our fair city. I hope so.

There is no place in Clarksville to buy a decent suit..men's or women's!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


What's going on in downtown Clarksville now a days? Any new businesses or rehabs of older structures going on?

I don't live there, Rural King, so I do not know everything that is happening but I do know that a group from Springfield purchased the Knights of Pythias building and is rehabbing that wonderful structure. It will be a mixed use building and I think will offer a few lofts.

Also, the Rivers and Spires Festival will be held downtown from April 17-19. This festival, while less than 10 years old, has garnered some major awards. I first attended two years ago with my daughter and went last year as well. Will definitely be attending this year as well. GREAT event! It now covers about 8 city blocks. I think it is better to go on a Friday or Saturday evening when the streets are packed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry, but that design is so uninspiring, even for a hospital built twenty years ago, much less for a brand new one.

If someone can dig up a pic of the Sutter Roseville (CA) Medical Center, you will see that hospitals can -- and I argue, should -- be designed in innovative and inspiring ways. Things like skylights throughout, and corridors that run at angles, and curves at interesting focal points, and well you get the idea. I'm no architect, but I'm like most people who can appreciate when a hospital doesn't look like a hospital.

The best I could find, but it shows only the front canopy. It's designed in a prairie style (with some Spanish mission undertones)...

http://sutterroseville.org/about/directions.html#2

I agree completely that the aesthetic looks are hardly inspiring. However, it is supposed to be a state of the art facility and it has attracted some medical specialists which were not previously available in Clarksville. But, yes, I too was disappointed in the physical aesthetics of the structure especially since it occupies a location of high visibility from I-24.

The immediate area is seeing some building going on and it looks as if there is room for quite a bit more along Ted Crozier Blvd..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I attended a party at the new F&M Bank headquarters in downtown Clarksville and took some photos of the area. Their top floor has a beautiful ballroom area with outdoor patios on all four sides, allowing for a 360 view of downtown.

Lots of spires. The historic Montgomery County Courthouse, Customs House Museum, Leaf Chronicle newspaper and several historic churches.

2373771743_f5bd8ce843.jpg

City Hall and Legion Street, with Austin Peay's Dunn Center and Hand Village in the distance.

2374610020_011124039d.jpg

Public Square and the Riverside Drive area. A ton of new residential development in the Emerald Hill district (at top).

2374613616_d64005774a.jpg

Historic Franklin Street, with Austin Peay's Sundquist Science Complex and Browning Building in the distance.

2374619476_c622abaeb1.jpg

Riverside Drive and the Cumberland Riverwalk.

2374617454_2011eda950.jpg

South Riverside Drive with the Cumberland Riverwalk (bottom left). You can also see the CSX bridge where the pylon had to be re-built after the barge accident last year. In the distance, you may be able to see where the new marina will be built...in the area between the large white flagpole on the riverbank and the bridge.

2373778979_12d73c6fb9.jpg

Edited by miami1855

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I attended a party at the new F&M Bank headquarters in downtown Clarksville and took some photos of the area. Their top floor has a beautiful ballroom area with outdoor patios on all four sides, allowing for a 360 view of downtown.

Lots of spires. The historic Montgomery County Courthouse, Customs House Museum, Leaf Chronicle newspaper and several historic churches.

2373771743_f5bd8ce843.jpg

City Hall and Legion Street, with Austin Peay's Dunn Center and Hand Village in the distance.

2374610020_011124039d.jpg

Public Square and the Riverside Drive area. A ton of new residential development in the Emerald Hill district (at top).

2374613616_d64005774a.jpg

Historic Franklin Street, with Austin Peay's Sundquist Science Complex and Browning Building in the distance.

2374619476_c622abaeb1.jpg

Riverside Drive and the Cumberland Riverwalk.

2374617454_2011eda950.jpg

South Riverside Drive with the Cumberland Riverwalk (bottom left). You can also see the CSX bridge where the pylon had to be re-built after the barge accident last year. In the distance, you may be able to see where the new marina will be built...in the area between the large white flagpole on the riverbank and the bridge.

2373778979_12d73c6fb9.jpg

Nice pics, Miami1855. I've always wanted to take some pictures from those balconys on the FM Bank Bldg. The very first photo reminds me; Do you know the status of the surface parking lot in your first photo? I know the Roxy wanted it to expand but the Roxy and the City were at odds concerning the property.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you know the status of the surface parking lot in your first photo? I know the Roxy wanted it to expand but the Roxy and the City were at odds concerning the property.

Last I heard, that area would still be used for parking even after the expansion of the Roxy. I have even heard that the city's adjacent garage would be extended toward 1st Street to offer even more parking. And with the Roxy planning to expand from 150ish seats to over 500, it will offer much needed spaces.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Roxy website has been posting this rendering of a new facility for a while.

roxylast_275.jpg

It looks all new as opposed to just an expansion of the existing building. They did have some interior drawings showing a first class performing arts facility. It will be quite a treasure for Clarksville on a level with Chattanooga or Knoxville.

Edited by PHofKS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@ miami1855 - Thanks for the great pics of the city from F&M Bank HQ. I haven't seen any recent pics of downtown in awhile, so it was nice to see how the downtown was looking now a days.

The Roxy expansion sounds like a great project. It certianly will take the facility to another level with that sort of increase in seating capacity. Thanks to PHofKS for the link and image.

@ Fallingwater - Thanks for the info on the potential Knights of Columbus building rehab and the Rivers and Spirals Festival coming up this April. I will have to tell my fiance about the festivasl as we might have to try to arrange a trip to visit her friend in the city to coincide in order to check it out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@ miami1855 - Thanks for the great pics of the city from F&M Bank HQ. I haven't seen any recent pics of downtown in awhile, so it was nice to see how the downtown was looking now a days.

The Roxy expansion sounds like a great project. It certianly will take the facility to another level with that sort of increase in seating capacity. Thanks to PHofKS for the link and image.

@ Fallingwater - Thanks for the info on the potential Knights of Columbus building rehab and the Rivers and Spirals Festival coming up this April. I will have to tell my fiance about the festivasl as we might have to try to arrange a trip to visit her friend in the city to coincide in order to check it out.

The Rivers and Spires Festival began in 2003 as a way to honor troops returning from Iraq. It hsa since grown to include much more than that as the festival committee also wanted to celebrate Clarksville's diversity of population. The festival is three days long but, again, I think the best times to go are on Friday and Saturday nights. This past year the festival garnered the prestigious Gold Grand Pinnacle Award from the International Festival and Events Association. The American Bus Association has also given it props as among the "Top 100 Events in North America." The Southeast Tourism Society gave it the distinction of being one of the "Top 20 events in the Southeast." The State of Tennessee gave it the Tourism Spotlight Award. Uhm, I don't know if I would call it one of the top events in North America but it is pretty cool nonetheless and I have certainly been impressed by it.

Not connected but I also believe that the city is being granted funds to restore Fort Defience which was the Civil War fortress overlooking the Cumberland River at the confluence of the Cumberland and Red Rivers. The plan was to extend the River Walk to the fort which would include a pedestrian bridge across the Red River to the fort. The earthworks to the fort are already pretty well preserved but the interpretive signage and such could be much better. UHm, the fort itself sits in a pretty bad neighborhood though. Incidentally, the fort was abandoned shortly after the fall of Fort Donelson as it was decided that Clarksville would surrender in order to bolster a defense of Nashville. Of course, Nashville surrendered without a fight too (initially).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you look at the 3rd photo posted by Miami1855 (Public Square) you will notice a building with a black awning and a red brick building next to it. Today's Leaf Chronicle (4/1/08) has an article abut the city council building a new chambers building where the buildings cited above will be razed. The Architect, Jerry Clark and Associates, says final plans are still one year off but he wants the council to "Think Big." If he means "big" in terms of size then the building will need to be vertical because it looks like it is a rather small lot for anything "big" other than a tall multi-storey building.

It should be noted that directly behind those buildings is part of the River Walk known as the Upland Trail and also a street. It is also on a very steep grade sloping downward toward the river.

Edited by Fallingwater

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you look at the 3rd photo posted by Miami1855 (Public Square) you will notice a building with a black awning and a red brick building next to it. Today's Leaf Chronicle (4/1/08) has an article abut the city council building a new chambers building where the buildings cited above will be razed. The Architect, Jerry Clark and Associates, says final plans are still one year off but he wants the council to "Think Big." If he means "big" in terms of size then the building will need to be vertical because it looks like it is a rather small lot for anything "big" other than a tall multi-storey building.

It should be noted that directly behind those buildings is part of the River Walk known as the Upland Trail and also a street. It is also on a very steep grade sloping downward toward the river.

I don't have a photo of what you are talking about, but these...

clarksville045.jpg

...are just to the north of that lot. Hopefully, these will remain.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah. As you can see from that photo, there is a hair salon in one of the buildings. There is also a pet store of some kind as well. Out of all the beautiful old buildings around Public Square, these are definitely in the worst shape. I think its a great idea.

And vertical buildings look so good on that edge of downtown. From the river they seem huge! F&M looks like it is nearing 10-15 stories instead of the actual 6.

Edited by miami1855

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:lol:

Yeah. As you can see from that photo, there is a hair salon in one of the buildings. There is also a pet store of some kind as well. Out of all the beautiful old buildings around Public Square, these are definitely in the worst shape. I think its a great idea.

And vertical buildings look so good on that edge of downtown. From the river they seem huge! F&M looks like it is nearing 10-15 stories instead of the actual 6.

A tower would be great for downtown. On that steep grade that building will appear huge from the riverside drive area. Not far away is the Two Rivers mall and I cannot help but to think that area will become the next Green Hills or Parkway Place like in Huntsville. Clarksvill has sooooooooooo musch potential. It could surpass Chattanooga! :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

An article in today's Clarksville Leaf Chronicle says that work has begun on revamping Legion Street downtown. This is a major project. Legion Street is one block over from Clarksville's darling avenue which is Franklin Street. Whereas Franklin street has all the charm and receives all the attention, Legion Street is an absolute eyesore with power lines running its length and sidewalks which are not up to code and garbage dumpsters along the street. The Clarksville City Hall building terminates this street.

The power lines are being buried underground and the street will receive new 20' wide sidewalks. The street will become a one way avenue with landscaping, period lighting and a large fountain and clock. Definitely an improvement and one I am anxious to see when it is complete.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The work planned for Legion Street sounds like it is long overdue and will do wonders for the streetscape.

Lots of things seem to be coming together in Clarksville in terms of its overall urban and economic development, I definitely think folks may be suprised to see the progress and change the city will see in the coming years. On many levels I think Clarksville continues to operate beneath the radar for folks watching places that are on the move within the state.

I saw a few days ago on an interactive map on the USA Today website that Clarksville was the only city in the state considered to be in recession by their findings. Is this actually the case and is it noticable on the ground in the city? All I could contribute it too was the housing market in Middle Tennessee over-heating in places like Clarksville and Nashville - which was listed as on the cusp of recession along with I believe Cleveland.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I saw a few days ago on an interactive map on the USA Today website that Clarksville was the only city in the state considered to be in recession by their findings. Is this actually the case and is it noticable on the ground in the city?

Although I don't think it has a major effect, deployment has hurt retail revenue as well as the housing market. So, in that way, we may be seen as more in recession than other cities around the state.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I looked at new housing in Clarksville on-line not long ago, is there any 80-90% brick new housing going up in the city? I see a lot more vinyl dominate new housing for costs very similar to new majority brick construction that is the rule in the Jackson area. In Nashville and a lot of it's metro I am less suprised as things are definitely priced at a higher premium and vinyl is the cheaper route for new construction, but I figured Clarksville would have more of a market for brick homes than it appears to. Is this a demand function - ie is the demand so high that vinyl will sell a home just as fast, for the same price, and less cost then a developer using brick? Or is this just a difference in regional developers approachs to design and construction methods. Any opinions or insights?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Although I don't think it has a major effect, deployment has hurt retail revenue as well as the housing market. So, in that way, we may be seen as more in recession than other cities around the state.

Do you have any statistics to back that up? I've found the market to be holding pretty steady all things considered. There have been many deployments in the past few years and Clarksville set records in 06 and 07. I know new home construction has dipped as it has everywhere in the US, but home sales seem to be holding thier own against other cities.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you have any statistics to back that up?

I am just speaking generally. I do agree that retail has still thrived even during these last deployments. However, it would be the only thing in my mind that would reason any publication to list Clarksville as in a recession. I don't see how it's possible. Trying to get a table at any restaurant in Clarksville on a Friday or Saturday night will tell you that we are in no recession!

I do, however, see a decline in new home sales around the Sango area. As in most markets, the mid- to upper- level homes do not look like they are selling well. And recently sold homes are going back on the market quickly.

Also, to answer Rural's question, a majority of the homes I see being built in Clarksville are what we call "brick and threes"...brick on the front and vinyl on the other three sides. However, there are several neighborhoods (most of the upper pricing areas) that are all brick or brick and stone houses. The new Wilson Green neighborhood is using varying materials such as composite shingles and siding, copper, brick, stone, etc... It is Clarksville's first "green" neighborhood.

Edited by miami1855

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I much prefer from the marketing stand-point the "Gateway to the New South" slogan and logo compared to "Tennessee's Top Spot". "Gateway to the New South" implies a new beginning in terms of growth and opportunity in an effective generic sense, while "Tennessee's Top Spot" will imply a very specific claim -or claims- that will have to be backed up and justified to potential new residents, businesses, and industries who will have already formulated in their own minds what that claim entails.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Gateway" no longer.

Cleaders unveiled a new logo and campaign slogan for Clarskville......"Tennessee's Top Spot."

http://theleafchronicle.com/apps/pbcs.dll/...411010/1002/rss

Thoughts?

How much money was paid to come up with that? The Gateway to the New South is something the city of Clarksville can certainly justify and grow into. The New South represents a time of change, growth, and increasing diversity as well as opportuniy. The New South is nationally recognized and can easily be marketed. I see where they are going, though. They want to be unique because the "New South" not only represents Tennessee but southern regions who have adopted the slogan head on. "Tennessee's top spot" almost sounds like Clarksville is competing directly with other Tennessee cities (which it is, ofcourse) but in a negative manor. I like the old slogan better. =(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Leaf-Chronicle is reporting that bids are being accepted to start work on the Legion Street project. The fountain sounds like a nice touch and burying those untilities will do wonders. That is one thing that stands out in my mind when I downtown Clarksville a few years ago was the darn utility wires obstructing some awfully nice nice views and streetscapes, so this sounds like a good start at addressing that aesthetic issue with downtown and do wonders with marketing it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By RobertinBeirut
      In 1965, Karam was the designer of the Beirut City Center, a multi-use complex with an egg-shaped shell housing a cinema, surrounded by towers and at the time the largest shopping mall in the middle east. The outbreak of the civil war in Lebanon in 1975 left the structure damaged beyond repair. Most of the buildings were razed but there have been some efforts to rehabilitate the egg (also nicknamed ‘sabouneh’ or soap by locals) which has survived, and which now occupies an iconic place in the hearts of Lebanese nostalgic for the country’s prewar era. In June 2004, a front page article in The Wall Street Journal discussed some designs to preserve and restore the egg.

      This series of photos, called "A Dozen Eggs" was created to encourage saving Beirut's Egg.
    • By RobertinBeirut
      In 1965, Karam was the designer of the Beirut City Center, a multi-use complex with an egg-shaped shell housing a cinema, surrounded by towers and at the time the largest shopping mall in the middle east. The outbreak of the civil war in Lebanon in 1975 left the structure damaged beyond repair. Most of the buildings were razed but there have been some efforts to rehabilitate the egg (also nicknamed ‘sabouneh’ or soap by locals) which has survived, and which now occupies an iconic place in the hearts of Lebanese nostalgic for the country’s prewar era. In June 2004, a front page article in The Wall Street Journal discussed some designs to preserve and restore the egg.

      This series of photos, called "A Dozen Eggs" was created to encourage saving Beirut's Egg.
    • By RobertinBeirut
      In 1965, Karam was the designer of the Beirut City Center, a multi-use complex with an egg-shaped shell housing a cinema, surrounded by towers and at the time the largest shopping mall in the middle east. The outbreak of the civil war in Lebanon in 1975 left the structure damaged beyond repair. Most of the buildings were razed but there have been some efforts to rehabilitate the egg (also nicknamed ‘sabouneh’ or soap by locals) which has survived, and which now occupies an iconic place in the hearts of Lebanese nostalgic for the country’s prewar era. In June 2004, a front page article in The Wall Street Journal discussed some designs to preserve and restore the egg.

      This series of photos, called "A Dozen Eggs" was created to encourage saving Beirut's Egg.
    • By RobertinBeirut
      In 1965, Karam was the designer of the Beirut City Center, a multi-use complex with an egg-shaped shell housing a cinema, surrounded by towers and at the time the largest shopping mall in the middle east. The outbreak of the civil war in Lebanon in 1975 left the structure damaged beyond repair. Most of the buildings were razed but there have been some efforts to rehabilitate the egg (also nicknamed ‘sabouneh’ or soap by locals) which has survived, and which now occupies an iconic place in the hearts of Lebanese nostalgic for the country’s prewar era. In June 2004, a front page article in The Wall Street Journal discussed some designs to preserve and restore the egg.

      This series of photos, called "A Dozen Eggs" was created to encourage saving Beirut's Egg.
    • By RobertinBeirut
      In 1965, Karam was the designer of the Beirut City Center, a multi-use complex with an egg-shaped shell housing a cinema, surrounded by towers and at the time the largest shopping mall in the middle east. The outbreak of the civil war in Lebanon in 1975 left the structure damaged beyond repair. Most of the buildings were razed but there have been some efforts to rehabilitate the egg (also nicknamed ‘sabouneh’ or soap by locals) which has survived, and which now occupies an iconic place in the hearts of Lebanese nostalgic for the country’s prewar era. In June 2004, a front page article in The Wall Street Journal discussed some designs to preserve and restore the egg.

      This series of photos, called "A Dozen Eggs" was created to encourage saving Beirut's Egg.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.