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MSA North & East - Montgomery, Sumner, and Wilson Counties

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2 hours ago, tragenvol said:

Only the northern portion is Golden Bear (Gateway not Parkway); it leads back into Mt. Juliet and connects with Hwy 70 past the new high school.  Mt. Juliet Golden Bears.

Ah, mystery solved.   Thanks!  

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12 hours ago, tragenvol said:

For clarity:  the new high school is on Golden Bear Gateway more west of town surrounded by new subdivisions; the planned high school would be in Green Hill and closer to Davidson County.

Development between Lebanon and Mt. Juliet is taking off; mostly residential, but both cities have cooperated for the pending housing  development's infrastructure needs south of 40 between Hwy 109 and Beckwith Rd/Golden Bear Gateway.

Yeah sorry, poor wording on my part.  I meant the new high school in MJ (Green Hill), not the "new" MJHS which is actually about 10 years old now (the building--there's been a Mt Juliet High School since before the Civil War).  The new Green Hill HS is so close to Davidson County there's a spot on Hwy 70 (Lebanon Road) nearby where you can actually see the Nashville skyline off in the distance.

Edited by jmtunafish

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22 hours ago, tragenvol said:

Only the northern portion is Golden Bear (Gateway not Parkway); it leads back into Mt. Juliet and connects with Hwy 70 past the new high school.  Mt. Juliet Golden Bears.

Sort of.  Beckwith Road still exists north of I-40.  Golden Bear Gateway is a new road that connects I-40 to Lebanon Road; Beckwith Road breaks off of GBG just a few hundred feet north of I-40 and also connects to Lebanon Road.

image.png.b5359d23fffde30173adb9175af18c7e.png

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3 hours ago, jmtunafish said:

Sort of.  Beckwith Road still exists north of I-40.  Golden Bear Gateway is a new road that connects I-40 to Lebanon Road; Beckwith Road breaks off of GBG just a few hundred feet north of I-40 and also connects to Lebanon Road.

 

And isn't Golden Bear Gateway an entirely new road, built in the last two years or so? That side of the interstate exit used to dead-end into nothing, or so I remember. 

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32 minutes ago, mbjjbbb said:

A ground breaking was held today for a new $150 million dollar horse racing venue in Oak Grove, KY, just across the border from Clarksville, TN and off Fort Campbell blvd. Though in Oak Grove, this will have positive employment and tourism impacts for Clarksville as well. 

 

https://www.theleafchronicle.com/story/news/local/clarksville/2019/04/09/groundbreaking-new-multi-million-dollar-horse-racing-venue-oak-grove-racing-gaming/3413603002/

https://clarksvillenow.com/local/churchill-downs-keeneland-break-ground-on-horse-racing-venue-in-oak-grove/

Churchill Downs has found a way to cash in on Nashville's boom!

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On 4/9/2019 at 8:16 PM, mbjjbbb said:

A ground breaking was held today for a new $150 million dollar horse racing venue in Oak Grove, KY, just across the border from Clarksville, TN and off Fort Campbell blvd. Though in Oak Grove, this will have positive employment and tourism impacts for Clarksville as well. 

 

https://www.theleafchronicle.com/story/news/local/clarksville/2019/04/09/groundbreaking-new-multi-million-dollar-horse-racing-venue-oak-grove-racing-gaming/3413603002/

https://clarksvillenow.com/local/churchill-downs-keeneland-break-ground-on-horse-racing-venue-in-oak-grove/

Yes, this has been in the works for some time (they applied for their racing license last year). There was Paducah Downs, which opened in the 80's and is now gone. This one will start with 12 racing dates, but not thoroughbreds (of course)

I love that there is a 3,000 seat amphitheater, 1,500 horseracing machines,,,,,,,,,, and a 1,200 seat grandstand

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Archer Datacenters is set to buy 30 acres on Gateway Drive in Gallatin (directly across the street from Beretta USA's factory) to build a 70,000 sq. ft. data center in 2020.  It will serve as a "colocation" center where space will er rented out to servers and other hardware businesses looking to securely store data. 

The company's first facility will house up to 5 megawatts of IT capacity. "We could replicate that building two or three times on the site," says Jordan Milman, the Wall Street entrepreneur  behind the project . The land purchase also includes the right of first refusal on adjacent land.  The development itself may only employ around 10 people, but the entities who end up renting space could be in the hundreds.

More behind the NBJ paywall here:

https://www.bizjournals.com/nashville/news/2019/04/15/nashvilles-boom-and-renewable-energy-power-new.html?iana=hpmvp_nsh_news_headline

This map shows the location of the Beretta factory, which is just to the north of this 30 acre development:

Screen Shot 2019-04-15 at 3.20.33 PM.png

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7 hours ago, markhollin said:

Some history on the former Superspeedway in Wilson County, photos from some of the races, and Panatonni's plans to make it one of the largest industrial parks in the region in this Tennessean article:

https://www.tennessean.com/story/news/2019/04/16/nashville-superspeedway-race-track-nascar/3488256002/

 

 

Ugh, seeing this makes me want to cry. Seemed like there was so much potential for this track, yet it only lasted 10 years. 

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11 hours ago, jmtunafish said:

I still wish someone with hugely deep pockets would make that land into a new Opryland.  The speedway site is 1,400 acres, and Panattoni bought only 147 acres.  Opryland was 120 acres, and the 4 theme parks that make up Disney World are only about 1,100 acres (out of 30,000 that Disney owns).  There's already a giant exit off of 840 that was built to accommodate superspeedway traffic which could easily accommodate theme park traffic.   There's plenty of room there for a kickass theme park.  Oh well.

Jeff Bezos has deep pockets and he's investing in Nashville. Jeff if you're reading this: We need theme park! Preferably Video Gameland or Musicland but Amazonland will do. We could shop while riding rides.

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43 minutes ago, NissanvilleTitans said:

Jeff Bezos has deep pockets and he's investing in Nashville. Jeff if you're reading this: We need theme park! Preferably Video Gameland or Musicland but Amazonland will do. We could shop while riding rides.

Bezosland...BezosWorld :D

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19 hours ago, Jamie Hall said:

Ugh, seeing this makes me want to cry. Seemed like there was so much potential for this track, yet it only lasted 10 years. 

There wasn't a lot of potential. The layout is uninteresting and makes for poor racing; the only redeeming factor is the concrete surface. The roval is a joke. Probably wouldn't have gotten better with the addition of the drag strip and short track.

Granted if it had gotten a full NASCAR weekend it would probably still be going strong, based on the market area alone. But as it is it's just another unremarkable cookie-cutter.

That being said, Nashville needs a track larger than the Fairgrounds Speedway. Or we can use my alternative proposal for a NASCAR weekend, version 2.0:

 

B.jpg

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Clayton Homes will establish a new $14 million assembly plant in Westmoreland in Sumner County at 1720 Pleasant Grove Rd. that will employ 110 people. 

More at NBJ here:

https://www.bizjournals.com/nashville/news/2019/04/22/warren-buffett-owned-housing-company-creating-110.html?iana=hpmvp_nsh_news_headline

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29 minutes ago, markhollin said:

Montgomery County officials today unveiled plans for a $105 million multi-purpose event center for downtown Clarksville at 2nd and College Streets.  The article doesn't list the capacity, but from the renderings, I estimate that it would be about 5,500 for hockey, 6,500 for basketball, and 7,000 for concerts.  The center would also include a second ice sheet,  and restaurant/bar.
Montgomery County Events Center, April 22, 2019, render 1.png

Montgomery County Events Center, April 22, 2019, render 2.png

This is awesome. Clarksville may be my go to for pro hockey. And glad to see the city of 150,000 and (Montgomery) county of  200,000+ think this big and become more of a complete city instead of some remote appendage of Nashville. 

At one time, they wanted to have Austin Peay play basketball there, although Peay has a perfectly good arena now.

40705700953_5e2b30bbde_z.jpg

On the other hand, it looks doubtful for minor league baseball anytime soon.

 

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The massive former Vulcan rubber plant in Clarksville (31 acres) is being razed, and Vulcan Corp. is selling.  It is now listed as an Opportunity one, so new investors will get substantial tax breaks  to develop the land. 

More behind the NBJ paywall here:

https://www.bizjournals.com/nashville/news/2019/04/30/big-tax-break-buoys-prospects-of-expansive.html?iana=hpmvp_nsh_news_headline

Vulcan Plant site, Clarksville, April, 2019, aerial.png

Screen Shot 2019-04-30 at 4.07.59 PM.png

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Beckwith Point is the working name for a 75 acre mixed-use development of 200 high-end townhomes, and 1.6 million sq. ft. of office and commercial space for Mt. Juliet near the Beckworth Rd. and Belinda Parkway near I-40. 

More at The Tennesseean here:

https://www.tennessean.com/story/news/local/wilson/2019/05/03/townhomes-mixed-use-plan-mt-juliet-beckwith-point/3662061002/

 

Screen Shot 2019-05-03 at 3.28.20 PM.png

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