Jump to content

Rural King

MSA North & East - Montgomery, Sumner, and Wilson Counties

Recommended Posts

On 8/17/2019 at 7:06 AM, smeagolsfree said:

We are checking as this may be one of the tallest new construction warehouses in the country. Multilevel warehouses are common in Asia but not here.

This one would be 92' tall. I think and that goes back to the typical warehouse floor almost as they are 20 to 30 feet ceilings, so this one is just under that.

I would not be surprised if this is Amazon as they are trending toward more multilevel urban warehouses although this one is not urban, it may be a trend that will continue.

I'm honestly surprised that they're looking at going multilevel. You typically see this in high density areas where land is at a premium. But with it being 3.5 million sqft, it may be cheaper to do it this way. This is a monster of a building. I'm in the motive power industry and have only heard of these types of warehouses, haven't actually seen one in person yet. We've seen a shift in companies going to narrow aisle and going a lot higher vertically, which of course increases demands on the batteries of the trucks. I'm sure this will be there same. This is bigger news than I think a lot of people realize. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


9 hours ago, satalac said:

I'm honestly surprised that they're looking at going multilevel. You typically see this in high density areas where land is at a premium. But with it being 3.5 million sqft, it may be cheaper to do it this way. This is a monster of a building. I'm in the motive power industry and have only heard of these types of warehouses, haven't actually seen one in person yet. We've seen a shift in companies going to narrow aisle and going a lot higher vertically, which of course increases demands on the batteries of the trucks. I'm sure this will be there same. This is bigger news than I think a lot of people realize. 

It is the equivalent of downtown getting a 1,500 ft tower. That's how I have been telling others, for comparison

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Will it be very close to the interstate where it will visible to the passing traffic. If so the size of it would be an amazing site coming into town.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
48 minutes ago, Buildtall said:

Will it be very close to the interstate where it will visible to the passing traffic. If so the size of it would be an amazing site coming into town.

Not really. It will be visible off in the distance because of the height, but I think most people will drive by and never know it's there

Screenshot_20190818-223548_Maps.jpg

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm wondering if this could be something Walmart related, with a name like Project Sam. There's a DC in Shelbyville and one in Hopkinsville, so it may not be, but if they were going after Amazon... maybe?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it mat be Amazon as they are the ones that are going after the larger warehouse space, but your guess could be on track. Sam's/Walmart seem to be struggling to keep up with the distribution system that Amazon already has in place. It will take a huge amount of financial commitment for them to bite the bullet to just catch up not to mention pass them which I dont see them doing.

As for me, I quit going to Wal-Hell for almost everything as I travel 20 minutes out of the way just to avoid the one that is 3 miles away from me. I think many people are doing the same thing and they are starting to feel the burn. Aldis is starting to eat their lunch as is Kroger and Dollar General. I understand a lot of their shoppers are not very savvy, so those folks just have no clue as it is ingrained their brain cells, "Hey, Lets go to Wal Mart". I will go to a competing store and pay a little more because its easier to get in and out for a gallon of milk as that is a ten minute stop for one item. Those quick items are in the back of the store. 

Wal Mart has lost their way as you go into their stores and they never have what you are looking for even though they have a large store and the quality of the goods they have seem to be sub par. They use to have banners in their stores touting they sold American made or even products made in that State. Not any more aa most of the items come from China and they will be hurt extremely bad by the tariffs. On top of that they seem to have trouble keeping the same item on the shelf two weeks in a row. They are not being consistent with their products any longer and people want consistency.

If the warehouse is Sam's/Walmart, it could be the start of  a huge gamble for them as they have already lost a lot of customers that will never ever go back and it may end up being the very start of the end of their company as we know it.

Sorry for the dissertation.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎2019‎-‎08‎-‎17 at 7:06 AM, smeagolsfree said:

We are checking as this may be one of the tallest new construction warehouses in the country. Multilevel warehouses are common in Asia but not here.

This one would be 92' tall. I think and that goes back to the typical warehouse floor almost as they are 20 to 30 feet ceilings, so this one is just under that.

I would not be surprised if this is Amazon as they are trending toward more multilevel urban warehouses although this one is not urban, it may be a trend that will continue.

I had thought originally that just the office portion would be multistory, but the total footprint of that building looks to be about one million square feet so a three-story warehouse portion checks out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some more info and better rendering of the layout for the massive Project Sam warehouse.

- The 3.52 million sq. ft. of warehouse space is equivalent to 61 football fields.

- Panattoni has hired Ragan-Smith Associates Inc. to work on the project.

- Atlanta's Macgregor Associates Architects designed the building.

- Mt. Juliet officials are weighing a requested rezoning and variances to allow the project to be built as currently designed.

The plans for Project Sam refer to one exit from the development being "for peak season only," indicating that a retailer of some kind will be occupying the building.

More behind the NBJ paywall here:

https://www.bizjournals.com/nashville/news/2019/08/19/giant-distribution-hub-pitched-for-project-sam.html?iana=hpmvp_nsh_news_headline


 

Screen Shot 2019-08-19 at 3.16.02 PM.png

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some housing news in Mt. Juliet:

A 16 home development called Eden's Grove to be built by Tony Meyers on 23 acres (mostly $1 million homes) has received preliminary approval for just north of Saundersville Rd. 

Also, a 60 unit townhome project called Hibbett Station was approved for 9 acres off of Clemmons and Curd Roads.

More at The Tennessean here:

https://www.tennessean.com/story/news/local/wilson/2019/08/27/mt-juliet-custom-home-sites-approved/2124003001/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A 192 unit development to be called Anderson Park has been approved for 20 acres on land east of Anderson Lane and north of East Main in Hendersonville.

More at The Tennessean here:

https://www.tennessean.com/story/news/local/sumner/hendersonville/2019/08/29/preliminary-plans-192-unit-development-behind-lowes-hendersonville-approved/2145937001/

 

Screen Shot 2019-08-30 at 6.09.46 AM.png

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/30/2019 at 6:12 AM, markhollin said:

A 192 unit development to be called Anderson Park has been approved for 20 acres on land east of Anderson Lane and north of East Main in Hendersonville.

More at The Tennessean here:

https://www.tennessean.com/story/news/local/sumner/hendersonville/2019/08/29/preliminary-plans-192-unit-development-behind-lowes-hendersonville-approved/2145937001/

 

Screen Shot 2019-08-30 at 6.09.46 AM.png

aka Anderson .Paak.    

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good  overview article about the massive 3.1 million sq. ft., 5 story warehouse that Panattoni is building in Wilson County, and how it will impact the community around it.  Speculation is that it is for Amazon.  As I have shared at Meet-Ups a couple of times---and is confirmed here---Amazon is building a 2.6 million sq. ft., 5 story distribution center near the airport in Oklahoma City.

https://www.tennessean.com/story/news/local/wilson/2019/09/03/amazon-mt-juliet-tennessee-project-sam-development-plan/2125084001/?utm_source=tennessean-Daily Briefing&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=daily_briefing&utm_term=list_article_thumb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
42 minutes ago, markhollin said:

Good  overview article about the massive 3.1 million sq. ft., 5 story warehouse that Panattoni is building in Wilson County, and how it will impact the community around it.  Speculation is that it is for Amazon.  As I have shared at Meet-Ups a couple of times---and is confirmed here---Amazon is building a 2.6 million sq. ft., 5 story distribution center near the airport in Oklahoma City.

https://www.tennessean.com/story/news/local/wilson/2019/09/03/amazon-mt-juliet-tennessee-project-sam-development-plan/2125084001/?utm_source=tennessean-Daily Briefing&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=daily_briefing&utm_term=list_article_thumb

Yeah, I've started to hear Amazon from more people too as well. The OKC warehouse is pretty much a dead giveaway that this is what it is. It's crazy how much square footage Amazon is going to have in Middle Tennessee if this is theirs.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Multi level would make sense for Amazon due to the types of product they sale and the industry push for that last mile delivery. It could be huge for Nashville not only for jobs but also for delivery service.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By RobertinBeirut
      In 1965, Karam was the designer of the Beirut City Center, a multi-use complex with an egg-shaped shell housing a cinema, surrounded by towers and at the time the largest shopping mall in the middle east. The outbreak of the civil war in Lebanon in 1975 left the structure damaged beyond repair. Most of the buildings were razed but there have been some efforts to rehabilitate the egg (also nicknamed ‘sabouneh’ or soap by locals) which has survived, and which now occupies an iconic place in the hearts of Lebanese nostalgic for the country’s prewar era. In June 2004, a front page article in The Wall Street Journal discussed some designs to preserve and restore the egg.

      This series of photos, called "A Dozen Eggs" was created to encourage saving Beirut's Egg.
    • By RobertinBeirut
      In 1965, Karam was the designer of the Beirut City Center, a multi-use complex with an egg-shaped shell housing a cinema, surrounded by towers and at the time the largest shopping mall in the middle east. The outbreak of the civil war in Lebanon in 1975 left the structure damaged beyond repair. Most of the buildings were razed but there have been some efforts to rehabilitate the egg (also nicknamed ‘sabouneh’ or soap by locals) which has survived, and which now occupies an iconic place in the hearts of Lebanese nostalgic for the country’s prewar era. In June 2004, a front page article in The Wall Street Journal discussed some designs to preserve and restore the egg.

      This series of photos, called "A Dozen Eggs" was created to encourage saving Beirut's Egg.
    • By RobertinBeirut
      In 1965, Karam was the designer of the Beirut City Center, a multi-use complex with an egg-shaped shell housing a cinema, surrounded by towers and at the time the largest shopping mall in the middle east. The outbreak of the civil war in Lebanon in 1975 left the structure damaged beyond repair. Most of the buildings were razed but there have been some efforts to rehabilitate the egg (also nicknamed ‘sabouneh’ or soap by locals) which has survived, and which now occupies an iconic place in the hearts of Lebanese nostalgic for the country’s prewar era. In June 2004, a front page article in The Wall Street Journal discussed some designs to preserve and restore the egg.

      This series of photos, called "A Dozen Eggs" was created to encourage saving Beirut's Egg.
    • By RobertinBeirut
      In 1965, Karam was the designer of the Beirut City Center, a multi-use complex with an egg-shaped shell housing a cinema, surrounded by towers and at the time the largest shopping mall in the middle east. The outbreak of the civil war in Lebanon in 1975 left the structure damaged beyond repair. Most of the buildings were razed but there have been some efforts to rehabilitate the egg (also nicknamed ‘sabouneh’ or soap by locals) which has survived, and which now occupies an iconic place in the hearts of Lebanese nostalgic for the country’s prewar era. In June 2004, a front page article in The Wall Street Journal discussed some designs to preserve and restore the egg.

      This series of photos, called "A Dozen Eggs" was created to encourage saving Beirut's Egg.
    • By RobertinBeirut
      In 1965, Karam was the designer of the Beirut City Center, a multi-use complex with an egg-shaped shell housing a cinema, surrounded by towers and at the time the largest shopping mall in the middle east. The outbreak of the civil war in Lebanon in 1975 left the structure damaged beyond repair. Most of the buildings were razed but there have been some efforts to rehabilitate the egg (also nicknamed ‘sabouneh’ or soap by locals) which has survived, and which now occupies an iconic place in the hearts of Lebanese nostalgic for the country’s prewar era. In June 2004, a front page article in The Wall Street Journal discussed some designs to preserve and restore the egg.

      This series of photos, called "A Dozen Eggs" was created to encourage saving Beirut's Egg.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.