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Rural King

MSA North & East - Montgomery, Sumner, and Wilson Counties

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^^Is part of that "average age 29" because of Ft. Campbell?  (talking about Clarksville)

Edited by titanhog
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3 projects to get underway soon in Lebanon:

1) Central 840 Logistics Center (2 stories, 861,000 sq. ft.) will get underway in 3rd quarter of this year on Odum Lane near Central Pike in Lebanon (rendering below).

2) Cedar Station Townhomes (29 buildings, 163 units on 13 acres) are being developed by D.R. Horton have been approved by Lebanon Planning Dept.  Will be on North Castle Heights Ave.

3)  Kroger on West Main St. has been approved for a 40,000 sq. ft. expansion to begin in the 2nd half of this year, with completion planned for lat 2021.

More at The Tennessean here:

https://www.tennessean.com/story/news/local/wilson/2020/05/28/lebanon-development-news-logistics-center-townhomes/5274833002/

 

Screen Shot 2020-05-29 at 8.15.35 AM.png

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https://www.tennessean.com/story/news/local/wilson/2020/06/02/2021-nascar-cup-series-scheduled-nashville-superspeedway/5312537002/

Looks like Dover-owned Nashville Superspeedway in Wilson County  is reopening in full, including scoring a NASCAR cup level race starting next year.   That would seem to cover the high level racing needs for this region.

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1 hour ago, Melrose said:

https://www.tennessean.com/story/news/local/wilson/2020/06/02/2021-nascar-cup-series-scheduled-nashville-superspeedway/5312537002/

Looks like Dover-owned Nashville Superspeedway in Wilson County  is reopening in full, including scoring a NASCAR cup level race starting next year.   That would seem to cover the high level racing needs for this region.

Wow!  That's the last thing I expected.  I thought that area was toast, as far as racing.  Very interesting stuff.

Btw...if this happens and become permanent, I'd imagine the Bristol guys will drop their pursuit of expanding and upgrading the Nashville Speedway.

Edited by titanhog

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Sounds like NASCAR went to Dover Motorsports and told them they would only get one race from now on (as they've rumored that they were wanting to take some of the "double races" and spread them out to smaller tracks).  I guess Dover decided that since they already have the Superspeedway (did they not sell it?)...their 2nd best way to go was to give their 2nd race to Nashville as a compromise?

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NASCAR at the superspeedway, good choice. Better accessibility, better parking. And enough room to move the state fair also. The SOF folks, might not have much to save.

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9 hours ago, nashvylle said:

 

Wait, so they're letting a rival have a Nashville race so they can get money to renovate the Fairgrounds to have a Nashville race.

803.png

Clearly what we need is a midweek race at the Fairgrounds followed by a full race weekend at the superspeedway.

Or... downtown street circuit

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Yeah... I'm not sure about that strategy.  NASCAR should never have left Middle Tennessee, but it's my sense there's only capacity for one major race there. The 'sport' is stagnant and has been for years now. It obviously grew too fast and far to markets that didn't value it like those in its 'home turf', and maybe Nashville is a beneficiary of their contraction. I think it'd be best to stay out at Wilson County. 

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This may ultimately play out very well for Dover IMHO. Dover International Speedway was probably going to be on the chopping block to lose one of it's races anyways once NASCAR goes through it contract renegotiation in the next couple years. While NASCAR grew quickly through the 90's and early 2000's the sport definitely had it's hiccups. I for one still HATE the chase (playoffs), but they have been moving in a direction to reclaim not only its roots as a sport, but are working on diversifying their bases. If they continue to run on tracks that are far outside the urban areas, they really are not going to achieve that. I could see an eventual date when NASCAR has dates at each track. Similarly, I could see a scenario where the Cup cars run on the superspeedway (which really it isn't a superspeedway) and the trucks and xfinity cars run the fairgrounds. They did this for years with Indianapolis Motor Speedway and Indianapolis Raceway Park. 

I really hope this maneuver works to get a ticket tax implemented, as it could help not just the Fairgrounds speedway, but this could be applied to all major sporting events so the city has a dedicated revenue stream to assist with upgrades (ie Nissan Stadium?). I'm not a fan of using general fund money (or even bonds if we have to worry about debt service), but having a dedicated revenue stream could really give the city something to fall back on in terms of capping how much they can "help" these really wealthy owners with their venues.

NASCAR is probably going to move away from having two dates at the same track for certain venues in favor of getting back to diverse racing conditions, but also getting back to their roots. Beyond the Fairgrounds, there are currently big pushes to get back North Wilkesboro and Rockingham speedways.

For all the rumors out there floating around, I really don't see a street race coming to NASCAR anytime soon. 

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The Wilson County Fair, scheduled for Aug. 13-22, will not be held this year due to Covid-19.  It is one of the largest fairs in Tennessee each year.  Next year's dates are Aug. 12-21, 2021.

https://www.tennessean.com/story/news/local/wilson/2020/06/04/wilson-county-fair-2020-canceled-due-covid-19/3146418001/

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Facebook has now purchased all of the land it needs for its massive Data Center in Gallatin. They bought the final chunk this week for $4.8 million, bringing their total investment on the 800 acres to $19.9 million.

More behind the NBJ paywall here:
 

https://www.bizjournals.com/nashville/news/2020/06/05/deal-dash-facebook-data-center-real-estate.html?iana=hpmvp_nsh_news_headline

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Beazer house builder has a contract on 222 acres at 6775 Hickory Ridge Rd in Lebanon for 700-775 homes.  They hope to have the first homes completed in late 2021. 

More at The Tennessean here:

https://www.tennessean.com/story/news/local/wilson/2020/06/05/beazer-aims-build-700-new-houses-lebanon-near-40-and-s-r-109/3153285001/

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Information pulled from an interesting SportingNews article talking about how NASCAR got  a race to Nashville, but at the wrong track....

https://www.sportingnews.com/us/nascar/news/nashville-nascar-race-track/1w0yfyfpip6711mdagxv1ull3e

Some highlights from the article:

  • Speedway is in "good shape" and would need some modernization costing in the range of 8 to 10 million dollars.
  • Disappointment around the garage and sport's media circles about adding another intermediate track.
  • Quote from Speedway Motorsports’ president and CEO Marcus Smith: "Our efforts to work with state and local government officials to revive the historic Nashville Fairgrounds Speedway will continue. We believe that the beloved short track in downtown Nashville provides tremendous opportunity to be a catalyst for year-round tourism and entertainment development.”

According to Bob Pockrass, some purse / sanction fees and revenue information has been released:

image.png.aa038a836f771accafb80c36061df87c.png

There are still concerns about the use of the track including from one of the most popular drivers in the sport:

image.png.eeb877a37797a29a8a2b794fe705f8e3.png

Edited by Bos2Nash
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17 hours ago, Bos2Nash said:
  • Disappointment around the garage and sport's media circles about adding another intermediate track.

As much as I hate to say it, moving a Dover date (usually an interesting or at least unique race ) to the superspeedway is a downgrade. The only thing the track has going for it from a racing perspective is the surface.

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That's actually not a Nutro facility anymore.  Royal Canin.  Both brands owned by Mars however...

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Glenbrook Village will be a mixed use development of condominiums, townhomes, and retail businesses on roughly 26 acres adjacent to the current Glenbrook Center in Hendersonville.  It will feature 186,000 sq. ft. of retail space, 297 residential units and a 150 condominium units.  four three-story residential condominium buildings and nine buildings with townhomes. There are plans for three mixed use residential buildings with retail on the ground floor and residential units on one of two other floors. Also included are two restaurants and two retail buildings.  Amenities will include community gardens, community pool, a playground and a dog park.  The residential buildings will be nestled around courtyards and green areas with sidewalks throughout the development. 



 

Glenbrook Village, June 30, 2020, diagram.png

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Lebanon officials have announced an unknown  national grocery store chain has submitted a site plan to build a grocery store on land near State Route 109 and Hickory Ridge Road on the city's west side.

More at The Tennessean here:

https://www.tennessean.com/story/news/local/wilson/2020/07/01/national-grocery-chain-submits-site-plan-lebanon/5359845002/

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