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MetroTN

New apartment construction methods

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 So are all of these new apartment buildings that I see popping up all over the place constructed any better than the older ones? I was looking at one that's being built just north of the new sounds stadium when I recently went to a game. Although the exterior style of the building will look more urban, it seems to me that the construction method being all wood is similar to those that are built in suburban, garden style communities. I happen to know that those communities tend to be noisy inbetween floors.  I live on the bottom floor of one now. It just seems hard for me to understand paying so much to live in some of these newer buildings whenever you are having to hear people walk on your ceiling. 

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It tends to be like that in many places. I have an apartment in a high rise built in the 1960s with extremely solid concrete construction. I can't hear anything above or below unless it's an impact of a hard object on a hard floor. Friends of mine that live in much newer, more expensive places, however, complain about hearing their neighbors ALL the time. It's, unfortunately, an unwelcome side effect of a booming apartment market: developers throw up something as quickly and cheaply as possible, knowing that even if the building itself is sub par, as long as it has a good location, decent amenities, and nice appliances and other hardware, then they'll still get a ton of cash out of it.

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I agree completely Nathan. That building I referenced near the Sounds stadium will certainly be expensive and popular. 

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At what height do developers start using concrete floor slabs vs all wood? 6 floors? 

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At what height do developers start using concrete floor slabs vs all wood? 6 floors? 

Generally, 6 floors. 

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At what height do developers start using concrete floor slabs vs all wood? 6 floors? 

Generally, 6 floors. 

As we all know, this just means they will build the first one or two out of concrete, then stack their six floors of sticks on top of that.

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Interesting. So at what floor count do we see all concrete floors? I know this seems like a silly thread question but Im just curious. 

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Interesting. So at what floor count do we see all concrete floors? I know this seems like a silly thread question but Im just curious. 

Typically 7 for residential, however it depends on designed floor height. If it's commercial then you'll see steel or concrete at almost anything over one floor due to lumber dimensions. 

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As we all know, this just means they will build the first one or two out of concrete, then stack their six floors of sticks on top of that.

I saw this tonight in Germantown. Some new apartments being built just north of Jefferson.

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There are still a few low rise apartment buildings using all concrete. It depends on the budget of the developer. 5th and Main, 2300 Elliston, and 1101 18th are all concrete. There are a few more.  Generally 6 and up is concrete and 1-5 is stick frame. However, if there is commercial on the first floor it has to have steel or concrete, so an apartment building with 7 floors may have two floors of concrete and five of stick.

Edited by Paramount747
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Looking at apartment construction around the various cities, it's also clear to me that the parking garage portion will be concrete, and that seems to be regardless of whether underground or above ground, such as at the Rosa Parks apartment building across from the Farmers Market. That stands to reason in light of the amount of weight the garage floors will need to support. 

Edited by MLBrumby

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