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lefty23

Brewery impacts on Asheville property

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As a regular visitor to Asheville, and hopefully one day resident I am hoping to understand if there is a real positive impact to the property and land from this boom of Breweries. They seem to be the main attraction to the city outside of the outdoor activities(skiiing, hiking and wilderness), and great for nightlife and keeping downtown bustling. But is there a value add to the land and properties in close proximity any more than before? 

 

Its so quiet in the Asheville forum I hope there are some folks who know or care to venture some ideas.    

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^ I am not super familiar with all the Asheville breweries but..

In general, breweries are forced by zoning into industrial districts. NC breweries have had a very powerful ability to make these previously neglected areas attractive, active and worthy of new investment. You can see this phenomena at every brewery in Charlotte. So I would say (based on anecdote rather than data) that breweries are powerful stimulants of property values when they go into industrial areas (given their current popularity). I don't know of any examples of breweries going into residential areas in NC so I can't comment on that situation. This relationship is also likely to deteriorate if/when local brewers become less popular. 

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Beer got hot in Asheville around 2009. Asheville's upswing began in the late 1980's. It would be hard to separate the chicken from the egg

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" ^ I am not super familiar with all the Asheville breweries but..

In general, breweries are forced by zoning into industrial districts. NC breweries have had a very powerful ability to make these previously neglected areas attractive, active and worthy of new investment. You can see this phenomena at every brewery in Charlotte. So I would say (based on anecdote rather than data) that breweries are powerful stimulants of property values when they go into industrial areas (given their current popularity). I don't know of any examples of breweries going into residential areas in NC so I can't comment on that situation. This relationship is also likely to deteriorate if/when local brewers become less popular. "

Neuse River and Nickel Point are on the same street in Raleigh and you have to drive through some expensive gentrifying neighborhoods to get to them. Several residents expressed apprehension at first, until they realized these were laid back, quiet, even family friendly hangouts and not like the bass heavy club seen on Glenwood. I would say folks are even grateful for an alternative to downtown. Asheville seems like it's breweries just added a whole new level to what was already a nice refreshing change of pace from the biggest cities in NC. Granted, Asheville is full of tourists and will never quite have the total neighborhood feel that I described for Nickel Point and Neuse River, but it is an important cog in the locally sourced approach to things of which Asheville has plenty of people who think consciously about such things. 

Edited by Jones_

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