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LEWIS PLAZA REDEVELOPMENT: Harris Teeter

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From the Greenville news

'One of a kind' Harris Teeter coming to Lewis Plaza

Eric Connor, [email protected]

Dec 18, 2014

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MYKAL McELDOWNEY/Staff

The massive transformation of Lewis Plaza will see Harris Teeter return to the Greenville market with a store that developers say will be the model for upscale grocery stores in South Carolina.

The Augusta Road area's historic Lewis Plaza has been in a state of transition for some time now — but the future of Greenville's oldest shopping center is coming into view as plans for a "one-of-a-kind" grocery store take shape.

The massive transformation of Lewis Plaza will see Harris Teeter return to the Greenville market with a store that developers say will be the model for upscale grocery stores in South Carolina.

"This is the only store like this in the entire chain," Paul Holder, vice president of Greenville-based AVTEX Commercial Properties, told The Greenville News.

The firm bought Lewis Plaza in 2011 and has been in discussions with Harris Teeter since fall of 2013, in addition to past talks with Publix, Whole Foods and Fresh Market, Holder said.

Harris Teeter has executed a lease on the property, said Danna Jones, a spokeswoman for the North Carolina-based company.

The transformation will dramatically change what Lewis Plaza has looked like it since first opened in 1948, modeled after a new kind of shopping center local developer R.M. Caine saw while stationed in California during World War II.

Original anchors of the center — Belk-Simpson, Sutton Shoes and Winfred Gravley's barber shop — have gone, as have newer retailers such as Ten Thousand Villages, which recently relocated downtown.

Among the changes will be the demolition of the old post office, which now sits vacant along Augusta Road as the most-recent home of the Shogun Japanese restaurant.

Developers explored various ways to keep the building, but in the end it will have to be torn down for the project to proceed as planned, Holder said.

All retailers except for Dollar General will remain in the shopping center, he said.

The Augusta Road area is under-served in the grocery market, with the closest being the downtown Publix that is smaller than what is proposed in the Harris Teeter.

"We are working directly with the city and the residents to provide a shopping center that fits into the Augusta Road neighborhood," Holder said.

The plans will have to go through the city and be approved as a "planned development." That means that whatever developers agree to will have to be built according to the final plans, City Planning Director Mike Kerski said.

The plans are ambitious.

"This will truly be one of a kind," Holder said.

The 50,000-square-foot space — once an Earth Fare supermarket — will feature a mezzanine level with a wine bar and terrace seating, he said.

The architecture will be in keeping with Greenville's progress, Holder said, with an openness provided by a generous use of glass, along with a pedestrian-oriented plaza with outdoor seating.

Along with expansive grocery departments inside will be a Starbucks and full-service pharmacy, he said.

The store will be open from 7 a.m. until 11 p.m., and the rear will be designed architecturally to resemble the same aesthetic as the front, Holder said.

The current Wells Fargo will be housed in a new building on site, he said.

The Dollar General store will be demolished and replaced with a 5,000-square-foot office space, he said.

The stores that will remain will see a significant facelift, though nothing architecturally will change, Holder said.

Construction would begin in March and take about a year and a half to complete, he said.

The group will conduct an informal community meeting next month along with official plans filed with the city, he said.

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Can you see them now?

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On 2/20/2016 at 11:02 AM, NBNY2GRNVL said:

 

76e70bcf9b39c34fe6a72ee185f8a97c.jpgd39be04e434b82110f56cfbe58281449.jpg454e376aab741c18e9b312075dc559fd.jpg

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

From the Greenville news

'One of a kind' Harris Teeter coming to Lewis Plaza

Eric Connor, [email protected]

Dec 18, 2014

Facebook

Twitter

Google Plus

more

MYKAL McELDOWNEY/Staff

The massive transformation of Lewis Plaza will see Harris Teeter return to the Greenville market with a store that developers say will be the model for upscale grocery stores in South Carolina.

The Augusta Road area's historic Lewis Plaza has been in a state of transition for some time now — but the future of Greenville's oldest shopping center is coming into view as plans for a "one-of-a-kind" grocery store take shape.

The massive transformation of Lewis Plaza will see Harris Teeter return to the Greenville market with a store that developers say will be the model for upscale grocery stores in South Carolina.

"This is the only store like this in the entire chain," Paul Holder, vice president of Greenville-based AVTEX Commercial Properties, told The Greenville News.

The firm bought Lewis Plaza in 2011 and has been in discussions with Harris Teeter since fall of 2013, in addition to past talks with Publix, Whole Foods and Fresh Market, Holder said.

Harris Teeter has executed a lease on the property, said Danna Jones, a spokeswoman for the North Carolina-based company.

The transformation will dramatically change what Lewis Plaza has looked like it since first opened in 1948, modeled after a new kind of shopping center local developer R.M. Caine saw while stationed in California during World War II.

Original anchors of the center — Belk-Simpson, Sutton Shoes and Winfred Gravley's barber shop — have gone, as have newer retailers such as Ten Thousand Villages, which recently relocated downtown.

Among the changes will be the demolition of the old post office, which now sits vacant along Augusta Road as the most-recent home of the Shogun Japanese restaurant.

Developers explored various ways to keep the building, but in the end it will have to be torn down for the project to proceed as planned, Holder said.

All retailers except for Dollar General will remain in the shopping center, he said.

The Augusta Road area is under-served in the grocery market, with the closest being the downtown Publix that is smaller than what is proposed in the Harris Teeter.

"We are working directly with the city and the residents to provide a shopping center that fits into the Augusta Road neighborhood," Holder said.

The plans will have to go through the city and be approved as a "planned development." That means that whatever developers agree to will have to be built according to the final plans, City Planning Director Mike Kerski said.

The plans are ambitious.

"This will truly be one of a kind," Holder said.

The 50,000-square-foot space — once an Earth Fare supermarket — will feature a mezzanine level with a wine bar and terrace seating, he said.

The architecture will be in keeping with Greenville's progress, Holder said, with an openness provided by a generous use of glass, along with a pedestrian-oriented plaza with outdoor seating.

Along with expansive grocery departments inside will be a Starbucks and full-service pharmacy, he said.

The store will be open from 7 a.m. until 11 p.m., and the rear will be designed architecturally to resemble the same aesthetic as the front, Holder said.

The current Wells Fargo will be housed in a new building on site, he said.

The Dollar General store will be demolished and replaced with a 5,000-square-foot office space, he said.

The stores that will remain will see a significant facelift, though nothing architecturally will change, Holder said.

Construction would begin in March and take about a year and a half to complete, he said.

The group will conduct an informal community meeting next month along with official plans filed with the city, he said.

 

 

 

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Progress..

and a Porsche

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Harris Teeter makes cool looking stores in the city.

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Posted (edited)

This project seems to be taking forever. They haven't even started on the Harris Teeter at the back. I am sure they are waiting for the Wells Fargo to be completed (that is taking forever also) at the front so the old one can be razed and the bulk of the construction to begin. Almost 2017 and no signs yet of HT starting at Lewis Plaza or North Pointe.

Edited by vistatiger

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These are complicated deals, they take time.

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I'm still not seeing why it's necessary; I'd rather go to the downtown Publix than deal with micro-laned and crowded Augusta Road.

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1 hour ago, mallguy said:

I'm still not seeing why it's necessary; I'd rather go to the downtown Publix than deal with micro-laned and crowded Augusta Road.

Because you don't live off of Augusta Road?

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The only other grocery stores in the area are two dumpy BiLos and a farther Publix. Who wouldn't want a Harris Teeter right on Augusta?

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Posted (edited)

10 hours ago, ursa carolina said:

Because you don't live off of Augusta Road?

The Augusta Road Harris Teeter will be much closer than the downtown Publix, actually.  I don't like navigating down Augusta in those narrow lanes and making a left turn.

10 hours ago, johnpro318 said:

Competition is good. Let the market decide. 

That's the mentality that led to the rise of Haywood and Laurens Roads and South Pleasantburg Drive and the original demise of downtown.  If we want a great downtown, we shouldn't just have a "build whatever you want, wherever you want" vision; the outcome with that approach could be the Greenville of the 1980s, with sprawl and a ghetto downtown.

Edited by mallguy

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1 hour ago, mallguy said:

The Augusta Road Harris Teeter will be much closer than the downtown Publix, actually.  I don't like navigating down Augusta in those narrow lanes and making a left turn.

That's the mentality that led to the rise of Haywood and Laurens Roads and South Pleasantburg Drive and the original demise of downtown.  If we want a great downtown, we shouldn't just have a "build whatever you want, wherever you want" vision; the outcome with that approach could be the Greenville of the 1980s, with sprawl and a ghetto downtown.

If they fail, another grocery store will replace them. This is not sprawl, its redevelopment. 

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4 hours ago, johnpro318 said:

If they fail, another grocery store will replace them. This is not sprawl, its redevelopment. 

It's the addition of multiple competitors to downtown businesses, all within a close range.  If we want a vibrant downtown, we need to steer commercial development there, rather than letting people build whatever/whenever in suburbia.  McAlister Square was pretty close to downtown and people had that same mindset then.  Haywood Mall was pretty close to McAlister Square and people had that mindset then (just look at the news articles with McAlister's reaction to Haywood's opening).  Some things apparently never change.

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2 hours ago, mallguy said:

It's the addition of multiple competitors to downtown businesses, all within a close range.  If we want a vibrant downtown, we need to steer commercial development there, rather than letting people build whatever/whenever in suburbia.  McAlister Square was pretty close to downtown and people had that same mindset then.  Haywood Mall was pretty close to McAlister Square and people had that mindset then (just look at the news articles with McAlister's reaction to Haywood's opening).  Some things apparently never change.

Harris Teeter isn't going to take anything away from Publix. There is so many people moving into this area (with money, non-BiLo shoppers) that it can support all three grocery stores.

Also, the City can ask businesses to be downtown, but it can not force them. There was nothing stopping for this grocery store from coming in.

And this grocery store takes nothing away from downtown either.

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I think technology drives trends in urban planning and living styles. The original suburbs happened because of changing technology, specifically the automobile and the interstate. The technology that is to come in the future is not conducive to sprawl and people being spread out. The new technology that will drive where people want to live will be faster internet and things like self-driving cars. All of those things are going to happen in the high-tech cities first. This will cause a continued pressure towards the city. All the coolest things that people are going to want are going to be in the cities not the outlying areas. I don't see that trend changing anytime soon.

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