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From Wikipedia:

On March 26, 2015, Pence signed Indiana Senate Bill 101, also known as the Indiana "religious objections" bill, into law.[69] The law's signing was met with widespread criticism by people and groups who felt the law was carefully worded in a way that would permit discrimination against LGBT persons.[70][71][72][73] Such organizations as the NCAA, the gamer convention Gen Con, and the Disciples of Christ spoke out against the law. Apple CEO Tim Cook and Salesforce.com CEO Marc Benioff condemned the law, with Salesforce.comsaying it would halt its plans to expand in the state.[74][75] Angie's List announced that they would cancel a $40 million expansion of their Indianapolis based headquarters due to concerns over the law. The expansion would have moved 1000 jobs into the state. The mayors of San Francisco and Seattle banned official travel to Indiana.[76] Thousands protested against the policy.[70] Five GOP state representatives voted against the bill, and Greg Ballard, the Republican mayor of Indianapolis, criticized it as sending the "wrong signal" about the state.[77]

Pence repeatedly defended the law, stating that it was not about discrimination. In an appearance on the ABC News program This Week with George Stephanopoulos,[78] Pence stated, "We are not going to change this law," while refusing to answer whether examples of discrimination against LGBT people given by Eric Miller of anti-LGBT group Advance America would be legal under the law.[79] Pence denied the law permitted discrimination and wrote in a March 31, 2015 Wall Street Journal op-ed, "If I saw a restaurant owner refuse to serve a gay couple, I wouldn’t eat there anymore. As governor of Indiana, if I were presented a bill that legalized discrimination against any person or group, I would veto it."[80]

Due to the backlash against the RFRA, on April 2, 2015 Pence signed legislation revising the law to prevent potential discrimination.[81] Discrimination against LGBT individuals in employment, housing, and public accommodation remains legal, an issue that will be debated in the 2016 legislative session, and Pence has yet to endorse a proposed bill.[82]

 

 

I assure you that not one seat in the legislature changed hands in the six days between March 26 and April 2.  

Pence is up for re-election as well this year, btw. 

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From the Winston-Salem Journal about the adverse effects HB2 could potentially have on the High Point Furniture Market. 

http://www.journalnow.com/news/local/high-point-market-says-house-bill-causing-businesses-to-cancel/article_b388e036-f511-11e5-a072-1b2aa7cf0cbf.html

 

"As leaders and organizers of the High Point Market, we feel an obligation to inform the public and our government leaders in Raleigh of the significant economic damage that HB 2 is having on the High Point Market and on the North Carolina economy," market officials said in a statement.

"Based on the reaction in just the last few days, hundreds, and perhaps thousands, of our customers will not attend market this April."

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Listening to the morning news here in Cambridge, MA, this morning (03/29/2016).  The negative fallout from HB2 just keeps coming: (1) the Boston City Council will consider imposing a travel ban on official travel to North Carolina; (2) the President of Northeastern University, which has a small graduate campus in Center City Charlotte,  issued a statement condemning HB2 and affirming the university's commitment to diversity and inclusiveness; and (3) Biogen, a biotechnology company headquartered in Cambridge issued a statement deploring HB2 and calling for its revocation.  Surely, this is the kind of adverse and unflattering publicity that Charlotte doesn't need.      

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From the Daily Kos website: www.dailykos.com

North Carolina attorney general says he won't defend the state's heinousanti-LGBT law in court

 
Eleveld_Pic_Color.JPG?1455658551
Tuesday Mar 29, 2016 · 12:01 PM EDT
 
  36/ 45 Comments 1218 Shares  Tweet
FILE - In this July 28, 2014 file photo, North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper addresses the North Carolina Sheriff's Association training conference at the Riverfront Convention Center in downtown New Bern, N.C.  The North Carolina Republican Party
 
 
NC Democratic Attorney General Roy Cooper

North Carolina's Democratic attorney general, Roy Cooper, said Tuesday he would not defend a lawsuit filed Monday challenging a newly enacted state law that targets LGBTQ citizens for discrimination. The law prohibits state localities from providing nondiscrimination protections for LGBTQ citizens, among other things. Gary Robertson reports:

Democrat Roy Cooper made the announcement Tuesday, a day after gay rights advocates sued the state to seek to overturn the law. The federal lawsuit lists Cooper among the defendants because of his official position, but he opposes the law and wants it repealed.

GOP lawmakers rammed the law through the legislature last Wednesday and Republican Gov. Pat McCrory immediately signed it. Cooper is seeking to unseat McCrory as governor this fall in what looks to be a tight race.

Congrats, McCrory! It's your hateful law, now you can deal with how to uphold it. (No official word yet on who will defend the law in Cooper’s stead, but McCrory was also named in the suit.)

 

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Last year there was the fiasco of the magistrate law "allowing" them to refuse public service to someone(s) they found distasteful and that whole disaster was completely predictable and Attorney General Cooper refused to represent the state in the lawsuit against it. Then just short months later this embarrassing episode. It is clear that the motivating factor is that these gerrymandered districts are Republican held and that the primary is the de facto election. Each representative and senator is committed to preventing ANY candidate from appearing to his/her right. As long as he is as far to the right as possible he is covered. The good of the people, ethics, and mercy are discarded.

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1 hour ago, tarhoosier said:

Last year there was the fiasco of the magistrate law "allowing" them to refuse public service to someone(s) they found distasteful and that whole disaster was completely predictable and Attorney General Cooper refused to represent the state in the lawsuit against it. Then just short months later this embarrassing episode. It is clear that the motivating factor is that these gerrymandered districts are Republican held and that the primary is the de facto election. Each representative and senator is committed to preventing ANY candidate from appearing to his/her right. As long as he is as far to the right as possible he is covered. The good of the people, ethics, and mercy are discarded.

Yes, when a party is in COMPLETE control, their true colors come out.  Don't forget that valuable lesson.  McCrory is just a Art Pope puppet.   

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1 hour ago, tarhoosier said:

 It is clear that the motivating factor is that these gerrymandered districts are Republican held and that the primary is the de facto election. 

Holy CRAP, you're right. That is so jacked up.

The funny (not funny) thing is, gerrymandering is nothing new, and is nothing unique to NC. So many state legislatures view themselves as private clubs that should only let in the right kinds of people that reflect their (sheltered) view of who should be one of them. They put up with the urban districts' reps who cause a nuisance every so often, but in general they just don't care about those that disagree with them. Many, many states would do what NC's legislature did if they could.

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"Major Companies Press North Carolina on Law Curbing Protections from Bias," in Wednesday, March 30, 2016, New York Times.

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/30/us/north-carolina-governor-attacks-critics-of-law-curbing-protections-from-bias.html?_r=0

Click open link in new window.  

Excerpt from the story:  "Bank of America, which has its headquarters in Charlotte, N.C., announced late Tuesday on Twitter that its leadership was joining 80 chief executives, including Timothy D. Cook of Apple and Mark Zuckerberg of Facebook, in objecting to the new law" (that eliminated anti-discrimination protections for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people). ... Such laws are bad for our employees and bad for business."

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From www.dailykos.

Eleveld_Pic_Color.JPG?1455658551
Wednesday Mar 30, 2016 · 3:36 PM EDT
 
Terry McAuliffe, Democratic nominee for Virginia governor, holds up a volunteer sign-up card as he campaigns in Dale City, Virginia, October 27, 2013.   REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst    (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS) - RTX14QKH
 
 
Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe vetoed a "religious freedom" bill Wednesday.

Republican North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory is really in a class by himself now in terms of spearheading 2016’s southern anti-LGBT effort. His neighboring governors in Virginia and Georgia—one a Democrat and one a Republican—have both vetoed laws that would have explicitly protected the right to discriminate against LGBT Americans. 

Virginia's Democratic governor, Terry McAuliffe, vetoed a "religious freedom" bill Wednesday, reports Brad Kutner.

“Although couched as a 'religious freedom' bill, this legislation is nothing more than an attempt to stigmatize,” said McAuliffe in a statement sent out following a live veto on the DC News radio station WTOP. [...]

“Any legitimate protections afforded by Senate Bill 41 are duplicative of the First Amendment to the Constitution of the United States;” wrote McAuliffe, who also pointed to Virginia’s long-held Religious Freedoms Act [...] “Any additional protections are styled in a manner that prefers one religious viewpoint—that marriage can only validly exist between a man and a woman—over all other viewpoints,” he said. 

McAuliffe joined Georgia's GOP governor, Nathan Deal, who vetoed that state's "religious liberty" bill Monday after getting a whiff of the backlash North Carolina is now facing.

That truly puts North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory in a class by himself as a "pioneer in bigotry.”

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7 hours ago, QCxpat said:

"Major Companies Press North Carolina on Law Curbing Protections from Bias," in Wednesday, March 30, 2016, New York Times.

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/30/us/north-carolina-governor-attacks-critics-of-law-curbing-protections-from-bias.html?_r=0

Click open link in new window.  

Excerpt from the story:  "Bank of America, which has its headquarters in Charlotte, N.C., announced late Tuesday on Twitter that its leadership was joining 80 chief executives, including Timothy D. Cook of Apple and Mark Zuckerberg of Facebook, in objecting to the new law" (that eliminated anti-discrimination protections for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people). ... Such laws are bad for our employees and bad for business."

Now, we are talking.

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