markhollin

Repurposed/revitalized historical buildings in Nashville

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 ^ ^ ^ Yep, that's a beauty at 1128 3rd Avenue South that I've had my eyes on for years.  Built in 1890. Was a drugstore for much of its lifespan.  Converted into a house a while back.  4 bedrooms, 4 baths. Could be a killer restaurant/coffeehouse.  Smack dab in the middle of the Chestnut Hill redevelopment going on for 1/2 mile in every direction. 

 

Screen Shot 2016-06-18 at 2.12.51 PM.png

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^That was still a drug store when I went to Johnson Middle 30+ years ago, just a block away. I remember when we did a walk over to Fort Negley (back when it was scary and abandoned), our teacher took us inside the store and bought us some candy.

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12 hours ago, markhollin said:

I believe that the revitalization of The Cannery was a main factor in the same happening at Cummins Station, and then spilled across the tracks into the transformation of The Gulch.

More history and a nice slide show is available here:
Cannery 2, 2016.jpg

 

I recall an unfortunate event during the transformation of the ancient dilapidated structure in summer 2003.  A heavy burst of wind and lightning struck the top floor of the building, and collapsing most of that top floor, which covered the southeastern (left-most) and center portion of the structure.  The owner was required to remove it, such that all that remains now is the mechanical enclosure atop the structure.  The removed portion setback from the northern-most coping in the view shown, had been vertically flush with the wall at trackside (south side).

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^ ^ ^ Great old house, Rookzie.  One website said that initial construction of 1724 Jefferson Street was 1870, and another dated it at 1925 (probably the addition on the back). It is a surviving example of the working-class houses built in Nashville during the period 1865-1900 - the modest small structure so difficult to preserve, the first to disappear with city growth and the onrush of time. Hopefully, as Jefferson Street continues a renaissance in the next decade, it can be preserved  and utilized instead of sitting boarded-up.

 

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18 hours ago, rookzie said:

I really cannot believe that it even remains this late in time. but the long vacant private residence near 1720 Jefferson St is a very structure, reminiscent of the house of nineteenth century architect Adolphus Heiman.  The nearly identical Heiman House, which had been located less than a mile east of this property, was razed almost half a century ago (1976).  I do not know of the owning party, but I recently have heard from local sources native to the district that a former dweller of that home passed away within the last 20 years or less.  I also recall having seen the property actually "maintained" with the lawn manicured regularly.  As is shown in the photo, even much of the iron fence and old concrete base is intact.  The fenced property partially shown at right is an outdoor auto detailing business.

Most of Heiman's vast influence, on ante-bellum and slightly later pre-20th-century works in Nashville, has passed into obscurity, as most of his work has been destroyed, including almost all of his public buildings and private residences, save a few notables as the residence of Joseph Acklen (Belmont Mansion) and Carillon tower on that campus, the former Univ. of Nashville's Lindsey Bldg. (the current Children's Theater at the Fulton Complex), and St. Mary's Church of the Seven Sorrows.

1720 Jefferson St. (current)

1720_Jefferson_St_37208%20_zpstg63r1yz.j

It would be absolutely criminal if this fine example of Heimanesque architecture were to be lost. Hopefully someone will step up and restore it. Even if not as a residence, it would make a fine doctor's office, and very convenient to the Fisk/Meharry campii, just a block away.

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The Sloan Building at 4519 Charlotte Avenue (at SE corner of 46th and Charlotte) was built in 1927.  I'm particularly partial to these two and three story structures from this era that we have all around Nashville.  Nice to see this one still fairly active, especially with Monty's Barbershop, which has been present since the beginning.  Your Move Real Estate, Fabu Wedding Decor, and The Blooming Boutique are also on this block.  Not sure what inhabits the 2nd floor.  Certainly there is potential for a restaurant or two as the neighborhood becomes denser with more apartments and condos coming along the avenue.  

http://www.yelp.com/biz/montys-barber-shop-nashville-2
 

Sloan Building, Charlotte Ave, 1927.jpg

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On 6/19/2016 at 0:22 AM, rookzie said:

I recall an unfortunate event during the transformation of the ancient dilapidated structure in summer 2003.  A heavy burst of wind and lightning struck the top floor of the building, and collapsing most of that top floor, which covered the southeastern (left-most) and center portion of the structure.  The owner was required to remove it, such that all that remains now is the mechanical enclosure atop the structure.  The removed portion setback from the northern-most coping in the view shown, had been vertically flush with the wall at trackside (south side).

I recently got married on what is now the top floor in their building, are you saying there used to be a floor even above that one?

 

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1 hour ago, bhibbs said:

I recently got married on what is now the top floor in their building, are you saying there used to be a floor even above that one?

There actually had been a fourth story on top ─ not a full story, but a story, nevertheless.  It probably was a blessing in disguise that it happened when it did, since the damage revealed much structural decay due to a century of neglect.

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On 6/19/2016 at 0:22 AM, rookzie said:

I recall an unfortunate event during the transformation of the ancient dilapidated structure in summer 2003.  A heavy burst of wind and lightning struck the top floor of the building, and collapsing most of that top floor, which covered the southeastern (left-most) and center portion of the structure.  The owner was required to remove it, such that all that remains now is the mechanical enclosure atop the structure.  The removed portion setback from the northern-most coping in the view shown, had been vertically flush with the wall at trackside (south side).

In the High Watt, which occupies a portion of the top floor of the Cannery complex, there is a large steel cylinder suspended from the ceiling joists above the bar.   It appears to pierce right through the roof.    I recall asking a bartender about it years ago and he told me it was part of the Dale Company jam making equipment that crashed through the roof during a storm (presumably the 2003 storm) and it was left there as part of the renovations that created the High Watt space.     I don't know if there is any truth to it, but it's a great story.   Bartenders are supposed to have good stories.      

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27 minutes ago, MLBrumby said:

Candles?  Fabric?  Old wood?  I'll just watch the video thanks. 

not sure if this is sarcasm towards my post or not......

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2 hours ago, bhibbs said:

not sure if this is sarcasm towards my post or not......

No sarcasm... just don't think I want to go to a live show with hundreds packed in an old building with so many fire hazards. It's a great building. I actually went there a few times back when I lived in Nashville (pre renovation).  Glad it's being used still.  Hope it stands for 100 years and more. 

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2 minutes ago, MLBrumby said:

No sarcasm... just don't think I want to go to a live show with hundreds packed in an old building with so many fire hazards. It's a great building. I actually went there a few times back when I lived in Nashville (pre renovation).  Glad it's being used still.  Hope it stands for 100 years and more. 

everything you see in those photos was in there for my wedding, that room is 100% empty otherwise.

and, the top/3rd floor is used only for weddings at this point. the venues are on levels one and two.

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Titanhog:  Terrific pics of Marathon Village area.  I agree.  Was started in 1881 with the Nashville Cotton Mills and then evolved into the Phoenix Cotton Mills until it fizzled out. Then Nashville businessman A.H. Robinson purchased the Marathon Automobile Division of the Southern Engine and Boiler Works in Jackson, TN and relocated  it into the empty Phoenix Mill buildings. Over the next three years, Marathon Motors produced over 5,000 cars there. During that time a few more additions were made to the factory and offices. But by 1914, production ceased there, and all was relocated to Indianapolis.  The complex sat empty for 4 years, and then returned to being a cotton mill after World War I.  Werthan Bag Company also bought part of the complex as a secondary mill and warehousing space until 1984. After sitting empty for about 8 years, the complex started its transformation into mixed-use retail, artistic space, and offices starting in the early 1990s.  There is still work to be done on certain sections, and will be exciting to see how it all finishes out in the next decade, along with surrounding blocks that are beginning to see resurgence as well.

 

Marathon Village 1, Nov.jpg

Marathon Village 2, Nov.jpg

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There is a funding effort underway to get the old Romanesque mansion on Broadway where the Rudy Law firm is located to a corner lot across from this building. Anyone here have a status of that house and the project that would replace it?  

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The Fall School Building was constructed in 1898 as part of Nashville's Public School System, and named after P.S Fall, a local businessman and one-time member of the Board of Education.  The three story central atrium, lighted by an octagonal glass cupola topping the hipped roof is the best interior feature. The building served the school system until 1970.  It sat dormant until 1881 when it was redeveloped into offices. In 2009 it became the Church of Scientology's Center for Nashville.

Looking east across 8th Avenue South from the interchange with Chestnut St. towards the front entrance:

Fall School, Scientology 1 X, Feb.JPG

 

Looking west towards the backside of Fall School from Chestnut Street:

Fall School, Scientology 2 X, June, 2016.JPG

 

Looking down from the second floor at the base of the central atrium.

historic-atrium-church-of-scientology-cc-nashville.jpg

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The May Hosiery properties at 427 Chestnut Avenue have tremendous possibilities for redevelopment. Originally begun in 1907 and added onto over the subsequent several decades, the mill became the largest sock factory in the South.  Eventually it went out of business in 1985, and the structures sat empty until the mid-90s.  Then, the owner began renting some of the spaces out to a handful of artisans.  Currently there are about 30 different artists, photographers, musicians, and craftsmen that have studios there, primarily on the first floors.  In 2015 an new group of investors purchased the 4-acre, triangular shaped lot that includes a dozen buildings and a total of 175,000 sq. ft.  Their long-range plan seems to include keeping much of the artisan vibe, while continuing to redevelop empty spaces into offices, retail, restaurants, perhaps even some residential and a music venue or two. 

This site is catty-corner (across Chestnut Street and the CSX tracks) from the massive new Outpost development, and just to the west of the Houston Station redevelopment (which was the original location of May Hosiery when it started in 1885).

http://www.tennessean.com/story/money/real-estate/2015/02/11/fort-houston-property-sold/23253167/

http://www.southnashvillelife.com/2010/08/may-hosiery-mill.html

http://mayhosierycoop.com/

 

May Hosiery 1, Feb.JPG

May Hosiery 2, Feb.JPG

May_Hosiery_3,_Feb.JPG

May_Hosiery_4,_Feb.JPG

May Hosiery 5, Feb. 2016.png

May Hosiery 6, Feb. 2016.png

May Hosiery 7, Feb. 2016.png

May Hosiery, Outpost, Fort Houston map.png

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Going to disagree on redeveloping the May Hosiery there, Mark. I think she should sit just as she is, because inside is a unique mashup of artists and their workspaces. It's very Bohemian. That said, I do wish they'd clean up a bit on the downstairs as it's terribly frightening at night. 

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