markhollin

Repurposed/revitalized historical buildings in Nashville

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U.S. Naval Reserve Training Building (RTB) was built in around 1944, during WWII. It is a “modified type B” Butler Hut used by the Navy as an armory and training center. It is a rare surviving example of “programmatic” or “mimetic” architecture in Davidson County. Mimetic architecture replicates something not usually considered a building and often has an association with the business conducted therein. The style became predominant in the mid-twentieth century in order to catch the attention of automobile drivers. Edwin A. Keeble – a well-known Nashville architect – made this a unique resource when he designed part of the building as a prow, making it a “ship-shaped” building. RTB is located in Shelby Park overlooking the Cumberland River, just a few hundred feet to the south. In accordance with a trend of the time; across the nation, urban training centers were located in either a municipal parks or on the outskirts of town near existing military facilities.

Today the building is no longer used by the Navy. I think the "boat portion" could make a great restaurant, or perhaps even a grouping of eateries, overlooking the river.  The back portion, which is extensive, could be a community center or event space.  I think it is utilized as such at times now, but for the most part, I think the whole thing sits empty for long stretches.
 

Looking NE along Davidson Street, which hugs the Cumberland River.

Naval Reserve Training 1, Shelby Park, Nov.JPG

 

Looking north from Davidson Street at the "prow of the ship."  Both decks could be great for outdoor dining.

Naval Reserve Training 2, Shelby Park, Nov.JPG

 

Looking south from the high hill in Shelby Park down toward the RTB.  You can see how close it is to the Cumberland River at that point.  One of the main frustrations of the view is the ugly cement processing plant directly across on the other shore.

Naval_Reserve_Training_3,_Shelby_Park,_Nov.JPG

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^Curiously about this mansion, it was just the two floors for a time (I believe it still was when I attended Johnson in the mid '80s, passing it every weekday). Described as an Italianate Mansion in the 1974 Nashville: A Short History and Selected Buildings, the recent 3rd floor "attic" addition transformed it into a Second Empire gem. You couldn't tell that what's above the cornice isn't original unless you looked close-up. Alas, we had so many mansions in the city in this style until 50-60 years ago, virtually all gone now.

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most of those buildings have docks for trucks to come in and out for deliveries and waste removal.
extending over the road or past the road would be interesting for this one reason alone...
my drivers trucks arent exactly short trucks.

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13 hours ago, markhollin said:

...
In creating a "Riverfront Cafe District" how far should the dining area extend out from the edge of the buildings? Should First Avenue be cut down to just 12 feet wide and covered in brick (So actual traffic to be just one direction/one lane, utilized primarily for horse-drawn carriages in the evening and garbage removal early each morning)?  Should there be canopies or balconies extending out from each restaurant, and, if so, what height restrictions? Should there be more foliage, or would that restrict views of the river?  Other thoughts?

Looking NW from the transit circle at then end of Broadway along the Cumberland Riverfront Park:

 

Looking south along First Avenue North from Church Street intersection:

 

Canopies and more foliage, please.  I think those buildings would look great with some flowers trailing out of window boxes here and there, adding to the European vibe.  Nashville needs some less raucous entertainment areas.

It is very dark at night right now, some gaslights or other decorative/mood lighting would help.

And it seems to me there's plenty of room to move the street or at least part of its length a bit closer to the river and keep it two lanes.  The existing terrace on the river side is wide, and 1st doesn't have to remain perfectly straight.  I don't see why trucks couldn't be accommodated in the design of the driveway cuts, even if it were reduced to one lane.  Deliveries are obviously going to have be at designated times.

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On 7/30/2016 at 10:33 AM, markhollin said:

Cummins Station is one of my favorite repurposing projects in Nashville over the past 25 years or so.  Built in 1907, this 109-year-old structure remains one of the largest buildings in Nashville as far as actual square footage (480,000). It has had a major renaissance from primarily warehousing space for products to be shipped for the bordering Gulch railroad yards, into a multi-faceted mixed-use hub, featuring 5 eateries, 2 clubs, and dozens of other businesses.  It's rebirth helped spark all of the development of the Gulch over the past 15 years.  The current ownership has discussed plans of adding 2 more floors to the top of the structure over the past several years, but no firm plans have ever been released.

The interior structure of the building is being reinforced to provide for increased stability in preparation for this vertical expansion. I haven't heard a timeline yet either, but work is definitely ongoing.

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When I took one of their rare public tours about six years ago, the guide indicated that there was some interest in opening up the building for other uses. They would like the revenue that rentals would bring, but the building would require considerable renovation to bring it up to codes for open public usage. I've played several old Masonic and Shrine Temples that book Broadway tours. (Detroit, Rochester, NY & Indianapolis come to mind) The one in Detroit, the largest Masonic Temple in the world, had been shuttered, last I heard. Rochester's is in pretty sad condition--I was there last December with a show.

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Detroit Masonic Temple postcard. My grandfather sent this to family in TN when he went north for work in the 1940s.

image.jpeg

Edited by donNdonelson2
Add info & photo
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There is a concert venue in the Detroit Temple now where i saw Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds there a couple years ago.  It is an incredible venue.

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The Detroit building has an unfinished indoor swimming pool on one of the upper floors-seventh, I believe. It was not finished because engineers warned that due to poor design, if filled, the weight of the water would collapse the structure! The adjoining locker rooms are near complete, with marble walls & floors. It's an amazing old building. Lots of very unusual features!

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Warner Bros. Records' former home eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places

http://www.tennessean.com/story/money/real-estate/2016/08/16/hold-placed-demolition-music-row-area-building/88839328/

636069577113274453-1815-Division-Street-photo-small.jpg

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

  • At one point, condos were planned for the property at 1815 Division St.
  • The hold allows time to discuss alternatives and to document the Midtown area property.
  • Three years ago, real estate investor Salah Ayesh paid $2.6 million for the 0.68-acre property.
  • In addition to housing music company offices, the location once housed a Florence Crittenton Home for Unwed Mothers.
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Sneak peek at $30M James Robertson hotel makeover

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

  • The 2,500-square-foot restaurant will be right off the main entrance on 7th Avenue North.
  • The rooftop bar will offer small bites and small plate dishes with a full-operating bar.
  • The Unbound Collection by Hyatt hotel is expected to open early in next year's fourth quarter.
  • The hotel will have 60 on-site parking spaces with overflow at a nearby garage.

http://www.tennessean.com/story/money/real-estate/2016/08/19/sneak-peek-30m-james-robertson-hotel-makeover/88976452/

636071504432867282-Hyatt-Unbound-Nashville---Pool-Deck.jpgThe James Robertson Apartments that housed low-income

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A structure with some neat possibilities for restaurant/retail is the block-long former warehouse at 603 Third Avenue North/601 Second Avenue North.  It stretches that entire block, facing Jo Johnston Blvd. on the south, and the CSX tracks on the north (where there used to be loading/unloading). Built in 1926 when this neighborhood was the burgeoning stockyard district, it originally housed a packing plant and later some food processing.  The western end is currently home to A-Around the Clock Bail Bonds, and as far as I can tell, the rest sits dormant. 

With all of the development booming around this locale (Town Place Suites Hotel, The Charlesville apartments, Water Tower Condos, Stockyard Apartments, Provident Germantown Apts, Sounds Apartments, First Tennessee Ballpark, and the new Criminal Justice Center all within 2 blocks), this would seem prime for repurposing in the next two years. Additionally, the nearly two full blocks just to the south and west are just parking lots at this time, and have great potential.  One drawback is organizing the eleven different owners of the various parcels that make up those blocks to either sell or work together towards redevelopment.

Looking NE along Jo Johnston Ave. from intersection with Third Ave. North:

603 Third Avenue South, Around the Clock Bail Bonds, 2016.JPG

 

Looking west along Jo Johnston Ave. from intersection with Second Ave. North:

601 Second Ave.JPG

 

Looking at screen shot from Smeagolsfree's Nashville Development Map.  The elongated structure in the center--just south of the RR tracks--is the subject of this post.  You can see the blocks just the the west and south have tremendous potential as well, most likely for mixed use. I predict that pretty much every empty lot in that area will be something vastly different within the next 5-10 years.

Screen Shot 2016-08-20 at 9.56.19 AM.png

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I was looking at that building a while ago and thought the same as you.

 

Great older building with a huge potential. There are buildings all over the place like this North of downtown Pittsburgh that have been repurposed.

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