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markhollin

Hensler-Stiles Peabody Union (32-story residential), Eakin Peabody Plaza (9-story, 280,000 sq. ft. office), & 4 smaller buildings, $265 million, MDHA Trolley Barn sites

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35 minutes ago, markhollin said:

 

Hensler-Stiles Trolley barn, May 14, 2019, render 1.png

Love this view!

Are they really keeping all the gigantic power line towers, they are in multiply renderings. What's that all about, how have those not been buried yet?

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1 hour ago, PaulChinetti said:

Love this view!

Are they really keeping all the gigantic power line towers, they are in multiply renderings. What's that all about, how have those not been buried yet?

Those are too high a voltage to be buried in a cost effective manner. 

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3 hours ago, L'burgnative said:

^^^I could be wrong but those look like the "VERY high power" lines... which you can not bury.  Too high of voltage.

 

3 hours ago, NashRugger said:

Those are too high a voltage to be buried in a cost effective manner. 

How do they do that in bigger cities? Just more underground space for things like that?

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^^^ Good question.  I would imagine extensive VERY DEEP (so you don't fry pedestrians above) underground tunneling somehow.  My big question is how is it maintained?  You send a worker down their and he's fried just being 10'-15' away from it with his feet on the ground.  shut down grids?

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1 hour ago, L'burgnative said:

^^^ Good question.  I would imagine extensive VERY DEEP (so you don't fry pedestrians above) underground tunneling somehow.  My big question is how is it maintained?  You send a worker down their and he's fried just being 10'-15' away from it with his feet on the ground.  shut down grids?

It actually doesn't have to be deep at all, a minimum of 3 to 7 feet for a 230 kV line. Pedestrians stay raw in this situation because the ground (the potential that the charge in a hot line is trying to reach) is surrounding the cable bank. As for the workers, overhead installations have minimal shielding and insulation, whereas underground lines are fully shielded and insulated for the same reason (ground all around). It's just much more expensive and involves a lot more ground disturbance which is why it is only done in urban areas or where overhead installations are impractical, such as near airports.

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19 hours ago, titanhog said:

^^Love that!  And..."hooli" cracks me up! :D  And the "Pear" sign.  Hilarious! :rofl:

I like the RIE outdoor store lol, 

 

13 hours ago, PaulChinetti said:

How do they do that in bigger cities? Just more underground space for things like that?

17 hours ago, L'burgnative said:

^^^I could be wrong but those look like the "VERY high power" lines... which you can not bury.  Too high of voltage.

17 hours ago, NashRugger said:

Those are too high a voltage to be buried in a cost effective manner. 

I agree with @PaulChinetti that these power lines should be buried. Especially because they go underground before Rolling Mill Hill. They go underground directly next to Pinewood Social and come back above ground just to the west of Riverhouse. This is just a matter of the the city and NES having a strong backbone and putting their foot down to require the developer to do this (I doubt they will get buried though - see Endeavor for why I think that :()

image.png.fde52efafad9dcd666b8aec28a4ac4f5.png

image.thumb.png.906456a352019c6a80bd42dcd8b8f757.png

 

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2 hours ago, PaulChinetti said:

Maybe it's too rocky along the bluff to bury them cost effectively?

It would cost many millions for sure and neither NES nor a developer, I'm sure, are willing to foot the bill simply for the sake of vistas and views. 

That's a big reason why I'm sure NES hasn't buried more power lines in the urban core. Why spend all that money and potentially (more likely than not) raise rates to pay for it when it benefits so few and the price of maintenance or repair versus burying is far less? I mean, it's a pretty reasonable thing if I were a NES customer that was to get zero benefit. 

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Urban NES customers drastically subsidize construction and maintenance of the enormous, inefficient network of power lines necessary to serve sprawling suburban subdivisions all over Davidson Co. Seems like it's not unreasonable to ask them to front the money to get these things buried. With appropriate design I'd also imagine buried lines are cheaper to maintain, since they're sheltered from the elements, you don't need a cherry picker to inspect a line, and nobody can fly a kite into them.

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I actually like those power lines. I’ve used them as a backdrop when taking pictures of my vehicles in various spots in the old trolley sheds area.  Love that industrial feel they add to the picture.

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Looks like Eakin's prediction of being topped out this month was a little off. Hopefully, this will not push Hensler's start back too much.

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35 minutes ago, Armacing said:

 But the crown jewel is PSC metals.  In my opinion, the most intriguing skyline view is looking west from I-24 with the rusted machinery of PSC in the foreground and gleaming glass towers looming in the background. 

Intriguing is an intriguing adjective to describe PSC metals! I would love to have all of the historic buildings torn down throughout Nashville's history to be rebuilt in PSC metals site (I can dream, yes).

I cannot stand that look, but to each their own!

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52 minutes ago, nashvylle said:

Intriguing is an intriguing adjective to describe PSC metals! I would love to have all of the historic buildings torn down throughout Nashville's history to be rebuilt in PSC metals site (I can dream, yes).

I cannot stand that look, but to each their own!

Yeah...my idea of gritty industrial would be Marathon Motorworks or Neuhoff...where a great re-use is possible.  PSC is a total “wipe-clean” and start over.

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22 hours ago, titanhog said:

Yeah...my idea of gritty industrial would be Marathon Motorworks or Neuhoff...where a great re-use is possible.  PSC is a total “wipe-clean” and start over.

Hey, a great re-use is possible at PSC metals!  It could easily be turned into a Mad Max-themed demolition derby arena.  People could dress up in their best post-apocalyptic garb and bring their outlandishly impractical cars there to smash into each other.  It would be a great tourist attraction and you could even keep processing scrap metal in the background to maintain authenticity.

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I will let you guys post the news but the Hensler tower is now slated for 32 strories from the original 26 according to the Post. I will let Mark post the story.

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