smeagolsfree

Embassy Suites (30 stories, 500 rooms), Curio Hotel (18 stories, 221 rooms)

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8 hours ago, titanhog said:

Yikes!! Good luck keeping that thing looking brand new with construction inches away!! :tw_grimace:

Developers have to fix it if they tear it up.

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This project is very attractive and I haven't one negative thing to say about it except that, well, glass has a look of impermanence about it. Couldn't we have some other materials? Cities which came of age much earlier than Nashville have tall structures of stone and marble that are a feast for the eye and give a character to the skyline that glass does not create.

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1 hour ago, archilove said:

This project is very attractive and I haven't one negative thing to say about it except that, well, glass has a look of impermanence about it. Couldn't we have some other materials? Cities which came of age much earlier than Nashville have tall structures of stone and marble that are a feast for the eye and give a character to the skyline that glass does not create.

What cities would those be? 

From what I hear, people think Nashville looks new and beautiful. Maybe Nashville should go with the stone age look and lose it's luster which in turn would beget howls of Nashville doesn't have a modern skyline.

Edited by Ingram

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49 minutes ago, Ingram said:

What cities would those be? 

From what I hear, people think Nashville looks new and beautiful. Maybe Nashville should go with the stone age look and lose it's luster which in turn would beget howls of Nashville doesn't have a modern skyline.

I don't think gothic towers would gets howls from anyone.

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1 hour ago, Ingram said:

What cities would those be? 

From what I hear, people think Nashville looks new and beautiful. Maybe Nashville should go with the stone age look and lose it's luster which in turn would beget howls of Nashville doesn't have a modern skyline.

I hate stone age architecture.

203px-Chrysler_Building_by_David_Shankbo

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50 minutes ago, Philip said:

I don't think gothic towers would gets howls from anyone.

 

Yes they would.

 

32 minutes ago, BnaBreaker said:

I hate stone age architecture.

203px-Chrysler_Building_by_David_Shankbo

 

I can see why.

 

Edited by Ingram

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1 hour ago, Ingram said:

What cities would those be? 

From what I hear, people think Nashville looks new and beautiful. Maybe Nashville should go with the stone age look and lose it's luster which in turn would beget howls of Nashville doesn't have a modern skyline.

Too right. 

2DF602DD-3DDB-4899-B943-CE7609E0AD28.jpeg

9FF4092C-94AD-43BF-8D2F-054E805B69C6.gif

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I agree with Ingram that a (relatively) homogeneous glass-and-steel look lends a very clean, unified, and modern look to sections of the skyline downtown.

(Side note: The Chrysler building would look pretty awesome if it were composed mainly of glass, too).

I'd love to see a transition to stone/marble/brick skyscrapers as we go further down West End, near the new Vandy towers/West End Methodist church/etc. I like the idea of separate neighborhoods having distinct architectural styles. As for that, I think that Nashville's newness is one of the best things we have going for us, in that our skyline isn't (for the most part) a hodgepodge of mismatched styles. It gives us a bit of a defining character relative to other, older cities. 

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Some examples of non-glass structures, old and new, from NYC that Nashville would be VERY LUCKY to have....

If you don't like stone, it's because you haven't seen good stone.

220cps.jpg

^ 220 Central Park South (on the left) topped-out and nearly completed. 

nyc.jpg

^ The new Four Seasons Hotel and condos downtown.

sherrynetherland.jpg

^ The forever iconic Sherry-Netherland Hotel built in 1927

Edited by NashvilleObserver
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1 hour ago, Pdt2f said:

Too right. 

2DF602DD-3DDB-4899-B943-CE7609E0AD28.jpeg

9FF4092C-94AD-43BF-8D2F-054E805B69C6.gif

I'm taking this as pure sarcasm, because the Tower Life building here is one of the best pre-war skyscrapers in this country outside of NYC and Chicago.  (I thought this before I moved to SA...ha!)

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19 minutes ago, arkitekte said:

I'm taking this as pure sarcasm, because the Tower Life building here is one of the best pre-war skyscrapers in this country outside of NYC and Chicago.  (I thought this before I moved to SA...ha!)

Complete and utter sarcasm, haha. I’m in love with the Tower Life building. San Antonio is an incredibly underrated city, partly because of their amazing pre-modern architecture. Sure they haven’t had that much new construction over the past couple decades, but the buildings they have are well maintained and worth preserving. 

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Those are ok but I’ll  take the glass over them,  but the Empire State Building or the Chrysler building would be nice and would love the aqua tower in Chicago.

C9057C96-0DB9-4F1B-9B7A-68028D430052.jpeg

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2 hours ago, TNinVB said:

When I brought my stepson to Nashville for a visit in 2016 for his first time, his first impression of the skyline when he saw it from the loop coming from I65 South was that Nashville looked very futuristic. Mind you he’s from Virginia Beach and had never been to a major city with a skyline before. I’d never thought of our ever expanding skyline as futuristic, but now I can see why he said that. Of course he really liked the Batman building, Pinnacle, Arena, and MCC. I thnink those buildings are what gave him the futuristic impression. 

Wait till we get one of these.  He'll really think futuristic! ;)

 

193259-artwork-fantasy_art-digital_art-clouds-water-sea-futuristic-architecture-cityscape-lights-signatures-horizon.jpg

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How about New York, Chicago, Philadelphia, maybe San Antonio. The Chrysler Building is my favorite New York skyscraper which I enjoy anew every time I see it. People fly thousands of miles and pay thousands of dollars to see old Paris. La Defense is a bore. But I am enjoying Nashville's development.

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detroit is stunning. my brother said he's likely going to be moving back, and i hope he does. i love that place.

 

edit: from afar i thought the book tower was my favorite building in detroit, but the guardian building is truly lovely. also - even though it's a shorty - the banker's trust building on congress x shelby is a a real beauty, too.

Edited by e-dub
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1 hour ago, archilove said:

I thought of Detroit after I made my post. I grew up there.  At the time Detroit was the 5th biggest city in the country with a population of 1,800,000 and the Penobscot Building was its tallest. My mother worked in the Book Building at Virginia Farrell's Beauty Salon and was also a "Rosie the Riveter" during World War 2, making P-38's. The trouble with Detroit today is that while the downtown is a museum piece feast for the eyes, a significant part of the surrounding area has been decimated. I didn't mean to say that I didn't like glass structures, but only that I preferred a mix of stone and glass, old and new, a city with heritage and texture.

That is a fascinating story!  I'm not sure if Detroit will ever climb all the way back to surpass it's peak population, but I hear that it is finally growing in population again, and even if those gains are small, it is a very welcome sign.  They also have a light rail system that is about to open, which is, of course, something Nashville is still arguing about.  So they do have a leg up on us in that regard too!

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