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With Amazon’s announcement of a new, separately branded supermarket chain with a broader selection of goods and a lower price point than Whole Foods, its interesting to ponder whether they’ll come to Orlando and which areas they’d select for stores.

There really is no competition to Publix in the middle and lower end close to downtown except for SuperTarget and the Walmart Neighborhood markets down at SoDo or our beloved Curry Ford Winn-Dixie.

(There are the Asian markets at Mills/50 but they tend to be geared to a very specific audience).

An Amazon Market (If that’s the name) might well have cred with the younger CV/Uptown folks.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/neilstern/2019/03/01/amazon-opening-more-retail-stores-in-grocery-and-its-not-whole-foods/amp/

From Forbes

Edited by spenser1058

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Totally inside baseball but I was struck by the change of graphics on this new Target.

I wonder if it’s specific to the smaller format stores or heralds a broader change.

Of course, lower-case has been the direction for a while, supposedly being warmer and fuzzier than caps (see WALMART becomes Walmart and WINN-DIXIE becomes  Winn-Dixie).

Publix has been ahead of the game for decades but the font REALLY needs to abandon the ‘70’s.

https://www.businessinsider.com/targets-leveraging-of-stores-creates-online-defense-2019-3

From Business Insider

Edited by spenser1058

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Not all dollar stores are thriving - Family Dollar parent Dollar Tree is closing almost 400 FD’s.

Like kudzu,  hydrilla and payday lenders, dollar stores are a plague upon us, demonstrating a key weak spot in our economy.

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19 hours ago, spenser1058 said:

Not all dollar stores are thriving - Family Dollar parent Dollar Tree is closing almost 400 FD’s.

Like kudzu,  hydrilla and payday lenders, dollar stores are a plague upon us, demonstrating a key weak spot in our economy.

Payday loans and dollar stores, AMEN!

19 hours ago, spenser1058 said:

Not all dollar stores are thriving - Family Dollar parent Dollar Tree is closing almost 400 FD’s.

Like kudzu,  hydrilla and payday lenders, dollar stores are a plague upon us, demonstrating a key weak spot in our economy.

https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/life/money/a26726038/family-dollar-closing-locations/

It's almost a bait & switch.

They are shutting down 390 stores, renovating 1,000 stores, rebranding 200 stores to Dollar Tree stores, BUT THEN are opening 350 new Family Dollar stores and 200 new Dollar Tree stores.

This is a net increase of 160 stores!

Edited by HankStrong
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The Empire(s) Strike Back -Both Walmart and Target are successfully fighting back against Amazon.

It turns out if you up your game in marrying e-commerce with bricks and mortar, you don’t have to end up like Sears.

In my own case, I’ve been stunned whenever I place an online order on the Target app, they send a text saying it’s ready to pick up only 5-10 minutes later.

Heaven knows I couldn’t make my way through SuperTarget that fast if I did it the old-fashioned way.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/panosmourdoukoutas/2019/03/14/walmart-and-target-beat-amazon/amp/

From Forbes

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21 hours ago, spenser1058 said:

The Empire(s) Strike Back -Both Walmart and Target are successfully fighting back against Amazon.

It turns out if you up your game in marrying e-commerce with bricks and mortar, you don’t have to end up like Sears.

In my own case, I’ve been stunned whenever I place an online order on the Target app, they send a text saying it’s ready to pick up only 5-10 minutes later.

Heaven knows I couldn’t make my way through SuperTarget that fast if I did it the old-fashioned way.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/panosmourdoukoutas/2019/03/14/walmart-and-target-beat-amazon/amp/

From Forbes

I think Amazon knows this and thats why they seem to be moving towards more and more locations, including a set of physical stores. An exciting time! Competition is healthy!

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Dollar General has decided to handle its own fresh and frozen items in a bid to make more of those goods available at its thousands of stores.

Although I still remain a skeptic, this is definitely a step in the right direction, especially for those areas where a dollar store is the only option for grocery shopping.

Kudos to DG for the effort.

https://www.supermarketnews.com/retail-financial/dollar-general-shifting-self-distribution-fresh-and-frozen

From Supermarket News 

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This is an interesting breakdown of CVS’ business. For our purposes, what’s striking is just how minor a player CVS’ non-pharmacy retail sales are compared to the rest of the company.

The article notes the “front-of-store” revenue only made up 9.8% of the top line.

That’s before CVS’ purchase of Aetna (a health insurance company) is included for a full year, which will take it even lower (to about 8%).

Retail margins are also notoriously tight so the amount sundries devote to the bottom line is probably even smaller.

CVS has a larger PBM operation than Walgreens and of course now a health insurance company that Walgreens doesn’t.

Nevertheless, it’s probably not unreasonable to suggest that, as Amazon moves into pharmacy and the healthcare model once again is scrutinized in the 2020 presidential election, that the two major retail pharmacies may find it useful to curtai less-profitable parts of their store fleets.

That could take the form of fewer retail locations or much smaller ones. It also makes the downtown Walgreens with no pharmacy even more of an oddity.

https://www.fool.com/amp/retirement/2019/03/24/dont-judge-cvs-health-by-its-stores.aspx

From The Motley Fool 

 

Edited by spenser1058

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On 3/24/2019 at 1:16 PM, spenser1058 said:

This is an interesting breakdown of CVS’ business. For our purposes, what’s striking is just how minor a player CVS’ non-pharmacy retail sales are compared to the rest of the company.

The article notes the “front-of-store” revenue only made up 9.8% of the top line.

That’s before CVS’ purchase of Aetna (a health insurance company) is included for a full year, which will take it even lower (to about 8%).

Retail margins are also notoriously tight so the amount sundries devote to the bottom line is probably even smaller.

CVS has a larger PBM operation than Walgreens and of course now a health insurance company that Walgreens doesn’t.

Nevertheless, it’s probably not unreasonable to suggest that, as Amazon moves into pharmacy and the healthcare model once again is scrutinized in the 2020 presidential election, that the two major retail pharmacies may find it useful to curtai less-profitable parts of their store fleets.

That could take the form of fewer retail locations or much smaller ones. It also makes the downtown Walgreens with no pharmacy even more of an oddity.

https://www.fool.com/amp/retirement/2019/03/24/dont-judge-cvs-health-by-its-stores.aspx

From The Motley Fool 

 

That's kinda fascinating.  I assume stuff like Claritin and Advil count for front of store?  I probably stop in once or twice a week and buy things on sale, but apparently I'm an outlier to their profits centers.

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One of the most in-depth breakdowns of the grocery wars in a key mid-Atlantic market, Charlotte.

For us, perhaps most interesting is Lakeland-based Publix’ inroads against Harris Teeter, a North Carolina favorite. (HT is now owned by Kroger, which is inching its way back into Florida via Lucky’s Market).

Also of interest is the resurgence of Target which had all but given up on food a few years ago. It’s now fighting back with an improved online presence and better selection. I’ve switched to Target for all but fresh and frozen items and couldn’t be happier.

https://amp.charlotteobserver.com/news/business/article228387794.html

From the Charlotte Observer 

Edited by spenser1058

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What will Amazon’s next grocery store look like?

https://www.forbes.com/sites/lanabandoim/2019/03/30/what-the-experts-think-of-amazons-supermarket-expansion-plans/amp/

From Forbes

More importantly, can we get one downtown?

I have to admit I am now doing my online grocery shopping with Target.com and it’s often less expensive with no need to pay for Prime or Prime Pantry. Target also has a deeper bench of private label items than Amazon or Publix, which I like.

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More on drugstores. Bloomberg suggeststhat, just as front of house sales are less profitable, so too are prescriptions in this new era.

watch for another big change on this end of retail - one that could definitely have an impact on our downtown.

https://www.bloomberg.com/amp/opinion/articles/2019-04-02/walgreens-earnings-retail-apocalypse-now-threatens-drug-stores

 

Edited by spenser1058

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Publix is having a "tasting event" today from 11am to 3pm.

Iow, they're handing out samples. 

If anyone is innarrested.

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12 minutes ago, JFW657 said:

Publix is having a "tasting event" today from 11am to 3pm.

Iow, they're handing out samples. 

If anyone is innarrested.

What a PLEASURE!

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Why Amazon Prime members aren’t flicking to Whole Foods:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/bryanpearson/2019/04/09/why-cant-amazon-convert-prime-shoppers-into-whole-foods-shoppers/amp/

From Forbes 

I’m a Prime Member (with a Chase Prime VISA card, no less) who has no desire to go all the way to the other side of Winter Park, or worse, to Dr. Phillips to shop at Whole Foods.

For that matter, I’m probably not renewing my Prime membership when it expires. It turns out everyday stuff at Target.com is usually cheaper than Amazon, especially with my REDcard. Since I don’t stream the stuff Prime offers and authors are abandoning Kindle Unlimited like flies, I have no incentive there.

Things like Levi’s, New Balance and higher-end clothing items you can’t get at Target I may still buy on Amazon but they usually trigger the minimum charge for free shipping anyway and I rarely need such things quickly.

 

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Ever wonder just how big Publix is? Well, in 2018, its revenues were comparable to Nike’s.

Interestingly, it’s net earnings were significantly higher, while the grocery business is considered extremely low-margin.

In fact, Publix net profits are significantly higher than just about any other major grocer. It seems we’ve been paying a pretty penny for all that PLEASURE.

https://www.tampabay.com/business/thats-a-lot-of-subs-publix-made-as-much-money-as-nike-in-2018-20190410/?template=amp

From the St Pete Times 

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I often make light of Publix for lagging behind on all the technology being introduced to the grocery business by the likes of Amazon and even Kroger.

Nevertheless, this week’s Publix app update, while hardly earth-shattering, at least has an interface that looks like it belongs in the 21st century. Hopefully, they’ll keep up the good work in Lakeland.

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