Jump to content

Recommended Posts

It looks like Hank may get to keep on Krogering after all. Recent data indicate the chain is holding its own against the likes of Walmart and Amazon’s Whole Foods in several major markets.

Meanwhile, Kroger recently reentered the Central Florida area after an absence of over two decades with its Lucky’s Market banner. Will it knock Publix out of the #1 space locally? We’ll see.

https://amp.cincinnati.com/amp/3400697002

From the Cincinnati Enquirer 

Edited by spenser1058
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


For all our Publix shoppers, stock up now on jelly beans and Easter eggs because your local Publix will be CLOSED this Easter Sunday.

And no Easter ham would definitely not be a PLEASURE.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wegman’s, the beloved New York State grocer currently sitting atop Consumer Reports’ Best Supermarkets list, gets closer to Florida in September with a new Raleigh, NC store.

It’s also the first time the chain will go head to head with Publix. We’ll see who wins this one soon.

https://www.supermarketnews.com/store-design-construction/wegmans-extends-its-reach

From Supermarket News

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There once was a national chain store so powerful a congressman said it would destroy America. America’s still here but the chain died a slow death. 

Walmart? Nope. Amazon? Nope. Sears? Nope. It was the Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Company, better known as the A&P.

Despite all the hand-wringing, virtually no US company survives competition over the long haul.

https://newfoodeconomy.org/ap-food-retail-small-business-grocery-chain-store-ban/amp/?utm_source=New Food Economy

From New Food Economy

In case you were wondering, the last remaining original member of the Dow Jones average was GE, which was removed just a few years ago.

Edited by spenser1058

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our Grocery Stores, Ourselves

What stanning for Publix, H-E-B, and Wegmans says about Americans

"Fandom, no matter where it’s directed, is a little weird, a little more about the person experiencing it than the thing they’re obsessing about. So what does it say when people stan their local grocery stores?"

https://www.eater.com/2019/4/24/18511650/publix-heb-wegmans-trader-joes-grocery-stores-fandom-stanning

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It’s of course, easy, and often expected these days, to appear cynical and care about nothing.

In my own case, I’d feel rather like an idiot if I went all fanboy over, say, Trader Joe’s, because there’s really nothing tying me to it (maybe Andy would have a special affinity for Two Buck Chuck - who knows?).

I also know that, while I like Target a lot and like the prices, the quick fulfillment, the clean stores and especially their values (a perfect score on the HRC index), I never get the warm fuzzies when I walk into one. I also know Minnesotans who feel very differently.

I was raised in a Winn-Dixie family. My mom’s first job was there, she met my dad there and, as a southerner, their stores had been around much of her life. Over the years, as it got worse and worse, she’d grumble after every trip for groceries but remained loyal her entire life.

When I first stepped into a Publix as a teenager, I was like “why aren’t we shopping here?” The store was cleaner, the aisles were wider, you could call the store if you needed to (Winn-Dixie refused to publish their number).

Central Florida has been a very transient place for much of my life - the people I knew who came from someplace else (most of them) acted like we had no history and nothing that was ours. Supposedly, there’s no local dialect (that’s wrong - listen to Buddy Dyer if you want to hear it - yep, I sound a lot like him).

Chicagoans had a collective meltdown when Macy’s pulled the Marshall Field name off the iconic State Street store. Sadly, by 1944, our major department store had been bought by Charlotte-based Ivey’s.

There were several Florida-based grocery stores but Publix not only was amazing (first automatic doors, first a/c, the iconic deco stores), it was also remarkably successful. Until 1990, it was also only for Floridians. Importantly, to this day, it hasn’t sold itself to some private equity fund. It’s still the same heirs of Mr. George running the show and the largest ESOP to boot.

There’s also the culture. The associates are friendlier but there’s also the Publix “feel”, created in the 1980’s by award-winning TV ads by a Florida-based ad company that I defy anyone but the hard core not to tear up at (since grocery shopping is still mostly done by women, that emotional tie is still something we jaded males scoff at even if inside we don’t want to). Just like a catechism, it made the tie between customer and company that much stronger.

If you think about it, most people visit their local Publix more each week than they go to Church. Think about that.

More has also remained consistent about it than any pro team that folks from up north go crazy about, where the players and coaches change constantly and they rarely have ties to the community.

If you think about it, in a capitalist nation, it stands to reason companies have closer ties to us than politicians who sell themselves to the highest bidder and spend most of their time somewhere else anyway.

For a very long time, Publix captured what Florida is all about almost perfectly. In fact, the schism many of us now have with it comes from the failure of its ingrown culture to evolve with us. Nevertheless, in the sense of familiarity, it’s still family.

There are certainly others - H*E*B, from what I’m told, perfectly captures what Texans new and old like to think about themselves.

Truthfully? I’m OK with that. In an era when a sense of place is harder and harder to come by, it’s great to have reminders, even if it’s mostly a mythology of how we imagine our little spot on the planet should be. 

Edited by spenser1058

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The waste in those stores has to be phenomenal.   How many people buy groceries at CVS?  Sure, in a pinch, but regular grocery shopping?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, HankStrong said:

The waste in those stores has to be phenomenal.   How many people buy groceries at CVS?  Sure, in a pinch, but regular grocery shopping?

My guess is some brilliant soul got the idea they could charge convenience store prices on stuff like that and make a killing. Apparently, it hasn’t worked out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually, CVS is changing their entire business model to be a fully-integrated healthcare company instead of just a local store with a pharmacy. 

This coincides with their acquisition of Aetna and their shift toward clinic and healthcare services provided in their locations, as opposed to retail store type items.  They are making a full shift away from standard retail/dollar store fare and will be focusing more on services and pharmacy/medical as an overall strategy. CVS knows they cannot likely compete with the discount stores, dollar stores, online retailers, and convenience as an overall strategy, so they are transforming the entire business model. 

Expect to see MinuteClinics in new and remaining stores offering Preventative Wellness and Outpatient Services to leverage existing relationships with the Pharmacy and Aetna and create synergy. Instead of offering low margin "products" they will be offering high margin "services" and will be consolidating that into highly localized already existing locations and future locations based upon demographic studies. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Colonial Publix is undergoing a renovation. They put new freezer/refrigerator units in throughout the store with doors on them, redid the produce section entirely (good), and changed the deli a bit so now there is a sub line with a fountain drink station next to where the cheese is (awful - that aisle was way too crowded already and now people can't even get in the damn store without frustration due to people stacking up in it). 
The floor was ripped up and patch in spots with unfinished concrete where they ran probably CW lines for the new refrigerators. 

I can kind of appreciate them trying to make it a little bit nicer, but honestly, they should have just tried to add on a bit with an entirely new deli/bakery section instead of trying to fix an old store that already has space issues. Also, some of the items I regularly purchase were not there. I don't know if they have even less space now with the new freezers, so they are stocking less, or they just stopped carrying what I want. Probably gonna had on over to the Edgewater Publix next time to see if they have what I like to buy. 

20190509_170614.thumb.jpg.bb3782af38ffcc8a6a51d9450e6e63c8.jpg

20190509_170646.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, dcluley98 said:

Colonial Publix is undergoing a renovation. They put new freezer/refrigerator units in throughout the store with doors on them, redid the produce section entirely (good), and changed the deli a bit so now there is a sub line with a fountain drink station next to where the cheese is (awful - that aisle was way too crowded already and now people can't even get in the damn store without frustration due to people stacking up in it). 
The floor was ripped up and patch in spots with unfinished concrete where they ran probably CW lines for the new refrigerators. 

I can kind of appreciate them trying to make it a little bit nicer, but honestly, they should have just tried to add on a bit with an entirely new deli/bakery section instead of trying to fix an old store that already has space issues. Also, some of the items I regularly purchase were not there. I don't know if they have even less space now with the new freezers, so they are stocking less, or they just stopped carrying what I want. Probably gonna had on over to the Edgewater Publix next time to see if they have what I like to buy. 

20190509_170614.thumb.jpg.bb3782af38ffcc8a6a51d9450e6e63c8.jpg

20190509_170646.jpg

Thanks for that update. Going forward, my understanding with the existing Village format stores is to slowly but surely delete many of the packaged goods that are increasingly being purchased online in order to expand prepared foods over by the deli or maybe even a dedicated island in the middle.

Keep in mind this is the Jacksonville division, however, is usually the last to innovate, so look for a lot of one step forward, two steps back before it’s sorted. The good news is that the Homonialtown store (as Billy Manes liked to call it) can be the guinea pig for Eola.

Edited by spenser1058

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.