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MetroTN

Nashville's Suburban Growth

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Here is the ranking. It appears to be a score based on population growth, employment growth, unemployment rate, new corporation growth, and housing permit growth.

10. La Vergne

9. Hendersonville

8. Gallatin

7. Brentwood

6. Lebanon

5. Murfreesboro

4. Nashville

3. Mt Juliet

2. Smyrna

1. Franklin

 

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Surprised to see Spring Hill is not on the list... population growth from 7700 in 2000 to a projected 43000 in 2020. It's destined to be Nashville's sixth largest suburban city then. 

Estimated populations 2020

Murfreesboro... 145,000

Franklin... 87,000

Hendersonville... 60,000

Smyrna... 53,000

Brentwood... 47,000

Spring Hill... 43,000

Mt. Juliet... 40,000

Gallatin... 39,200

Columbia... 38,000

Lavergne... 37,500

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On 3/11/2017 at 11:17 PM, MLBrumby said:

Surprised to see Spring Hill is not on the list... population growth from 7700 in 2000 to a projected 43000 in 2020. It's destined to be Nashville's sixth largest suburban city then. 

I would suspect that Spring Hills' other attributes are limiting.  There are some businesses but there really isn't a large employer that I can think of (the GM plant is not in the city of Spring Hill). 

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Estimated populations 2020

Murfreesboro... 145,000

Possible, a little high.

Franklin... 87,000

Improbable, without annexation.

Hendersonville... 60,000

Possible

Smyrna... 53,000

High.

Brentwood... 47,000

Possible, a little high

Spring Hill... 43,000

Possible, sadly

Mt. Juliet... 40,000

High.

Gallatin... 39,200

High.

Columbia... 38,000

High, without annexation.

Lavergne... 37,500

High, without pills.

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I thought a couple seemed high too. I should have said these are not mine; and of course, they're not official. While I rounded to the nearest hundred, they're from a friend, actually a friend of my father's, who is a retired Math professor at Georgia Tech & Sewanee. He's also a trained actuary who only consults businesses these days on market demographic details. He has consulted several governors, and nailed the past two (2000 and 2010) census results. Some of his spreadsheets are hundreds of pages in length. He gives everything in ranges (I understand to allow for economic changes), but that's probably standard. He also said he assumed an increasing growth rate for these numbers above; something he says the US Census projections miss every time.  A very humble guy, after doing these for 40 years he still qualifies his numbers by saying, "now these are just estimates", almost every other breath. Sort of annoying. I want to tell him he should be more confident. Anyway, I put them here to look back and see how close he was on these. 

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