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Grand Bohemian Hotel – 15 Floors – 254 Rooms – Boutique Hotel

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I for one am not a huge fan of Bradford pears (they split if improperly maintained and still do if you do so properly, they're a mess, they stink and they're only pretty once a year) and wouldn't mind if they were all cut down in the city (I'm talking to you my neighbor across the street).


Going off topic for a second here. I believe I read in the CO a month ago that the city is going to cut down all of the Bradford pears that line the streets in Charlotte and replace them with something hardier over the next few years. I think the upkeep was getting too costly and they were becoming a danger to cars and pedestrians.

And, while this was greenspace, I never really found it all that inviting. To me, it just looked a good place for a homeless camp.
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1 hour ago, AuLukey said:

 


Going off topic for a second here. I believe I read in the CO a month ago that the city is going to cut down all of the Bradford pears that line the streets in Charlotte and replace them with something hardier over the next few years. I think the upkeep was getting too costly and they were becoming a danger to cars and pedestrians.

And, while this was greenspace, I never really found it all that inviting. To me, it just looked a good place for a homeless camp.

 

I don't think hardiness was the issue. Those trees handle our winters well. I would love to replace them with live Oaks. We are able to grow those and they look great (think the exits around BOA Stadium).

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22 minutes ago, CarolinaDaydreamin said:

I don't think hardiness was the issue. Those trees handle our winters well. I would love to replace them with live Oaks. We are able to grow those and they look great (think the exits around BOA Stadium).

It isn't winter that kills them - it is age. They are an ornamental tree and only have a life span of 15 - 25 years. Once they hit old age, they split apart at the seams and fall to the ground which is very dangerous along roads, sidewalks, and one story buildings. The city needs to take them down pro-actively when they are older, rather than wait for them to fall into the road. 

Charlotte is facing two battles on dying trees. Bradford pears that were extremely popular and the tress of choice in the 80's and 90's are dying and falling down. Then you have the willow oaks in neighborhoods like Myers Park. These trees can live 130-150 years in the wild, but likely have a shorter lifespan in an urban environment. Many of these trees are now 80-90 years old in neighborhoods like Myers Park which means they are going to start dying too and increasingly fall to the ground due to disease and age over the next 40 years. 

 

Edited by CLT2014
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7 hours ago, 11 HouseBZ said:

I for one am not a huge fan of Bradford pears (they split if improperly maintained and still do if you do so properly, they're a mess, they stink and they're only pretty once a year) and wouldn't mind if they were all cut down in the city (I'm talking to you my neighbor across the street). All jokes aside, I'd rather have usable green space than unusable space that is there just because it's green.

Am I the only one that loves the smell of Bradford Pears? Everyone says they smell like old fish, which... I get... but they were everywhere in my late-seventies subdivision, so, I have serious nostalgia for the spring when I smell em

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Am I the only one that loves the smell of Bradford Pears? Everyone says they smell like old fish, which... I get... but they were everywhere in my late-seventies subdivision, so, I have serious nostalgia for the spring when I smell em

*dry heave*


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We should be able to see this rise from the ball park right? I love going to games and seeing new buildings grow.

Definitely not most of it, Carillon would be 90% if not completely in the way.


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4 hours ago, SgtCampsalot said:

Am I the only one that loves the smell of Bradford Pears? Everyone says they smell like old fish, which... I get... but they were everywhere in my late-seventies subdivision, so, I have serious nostalgia for the spring when I smell em

Yep, I’m pretty sure you are the only one!

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9 hours ago, Cadi40 said:

Charlotte needs trees that can survive very bipolar weather, For example - 75 in the winter and snowing in spring. 

Charlotte's weather is actually more stable than the similar latitude in the same climate zone in China (basically the mirror of our climate). The laurel oaks work well.  Magnolias and Cypress can easily survive as well. Charlotte gets cold but not for more than 12 or so hours. 

4 hours ago, SgtCampsalot said:

Am I the only one that loves the smell of Bradford Pears? Everyone says they smell like old fish, which... I get... but they were everywhere in my late-seventies subdivision, so, I have serious nostalgia for the spring when I smell em

It smells like a rag you used in high school to clean wait, nvm...

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The cultivar 'Cleveland Select' doesn't have crouch issues of the original hybrid making them better street trees.     

Edited by Phillydog

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On 12/19/2017 at 7:15 AM, JoshuaDrown said:

It looks like that lack of direct sun is going to result in this area being synthetic turf...

5a391edb23f91_GrandBohemianParkSection.jpg.02566dd100f281b15f94ba3db4d7813f.jpg

 

wow, astroturf serving as the green space here?  horrible

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27 minutes ago, BullDurhamer said:

wow, astroturf serving as the green space here?  horrible

Reserve judgement until it is implemented.

Edited by Scribe

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14 minutes ago, BullDurhamer said:

sure, let's needlessly poison

LOL! Lets just pour concrete over it all and call it a day. Grow up!

Grass needs sunlight!

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28 minutes ago, CLT2014 said:

It isn't like grass lawns popular in Charlotte from genetically modified grass seeds from chemical companies are "natural", "real", and that great for the environment.  First they take a lot of water, reducing the amount of clean water that flows in our rivers. 30% - 60% of urban water use is being wasted on "grass" lawns that are not native and require lots of water to stay green. What is natural would be a bunch of weeds, but nobody wants that so realistically the grass fescue lawn is basically artificial and only occurring because we dump precious water and chemicals on it. Here's a look at all the lovely chemicals and gas being used to maintain grass lawns across the metro:

1.) First people have lawn service come out 8 times per year to spray chemicals all over their unnatural lawn to fight back the native weeds that actually want to grow in the lawn. Then they run the sprinklers and it runs off into the street, which ends up in the creeks:

Related image

2.) After the weed guy leaves, the pesticide guy shows up in his truck to spray even more chemicals all over the lawn to kill off the bugs that love living in the grass and drive people crazy.

3. ) And then you break out the mower: 

  • 1 hour of the average gas lawn mower is like a car being driven 200 miles or 11 cars being driven for an hour. So 1 lawn mower pollutes as much as 11 cars.

4.) An estimated 17 million gallons of gasoline and oil is spilled in driveways, yards, and roads refilling gas mowers which then drains off into the streets and then into rivers

5.) Then you break out the lawn edger to trim back the lawn corners and keep it looking nice, adding to the additional lawn/gardening equipment estimated to be responsible for 5% of the nation's air pollution. 

 

A sustainable solution would be native plants and bushes, even natural North Carolina weeds... but a fescue or bermuda lawn in North Carolina isn't really a "green" solution. 

 

I completely agree about grass. 

We need to think beyond grass and fake grass for many of the obvious reasons going forward.    Making it a grass vs. fake grass competition is just a fancy way for the fake grass companies to sell more fake grass.  

Edited by BullDurhamer

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1 hour ago, Scribe said:

LOL! Lets just pour concrete over it all and call it a day. Grow up!

Grass needs sunlight!

Why are you stuck on grass being the only thing that could possibly ever live?  Wake up!  

Seriously,  it's time the south seriously starts to consider the impact of the growing population and climate change on how everything is impacted.  It would help if the elected politicians would acknowledge all of the looming crises we face as a result of these changes since this insane idea that the only thing that could ever grow in a natural space is grass.  On the other hand, you propose that concrete would be the only other alternative,  another complete fallacy.   I suggest you get out west some time and see how they are decades ahead of the south in terms of understanding how to address some of these questions.     

As Charlotte and most other urban area of size these days fills in, the time is now to decide how we want to design them for the long haul.     Fake or real?       I guess if you have a stake in the fake industry, then your choice may already be made.  Sad.

 

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