Jump to content

smileguy

Radius | 13-Story Residential [Under Construction]

Recommended Posts


There are a number of design enhancements that Banner has yet to meet that are required for the density bonus, including: a roof line that is sculpted to create an interesting form or enhance the downtown skyline, or alternatively a "green" roof; the primary building entrance must be a prominent feature; use of durable, high-quality materials appropriate for the climate; and placement of the parking garage on the site's interior, or lining it with habitable space along the street. 

The project also doesn't meet criteria of the Downtown Design Guidelines as of now, including: that a new building must be sited in a way that complements existing adjacent buildings; the height-and-mass transition from existing buildings to a new one should be gradual; and that high-density buildings next to residential neighborhoods must step down in height.

Currently, the transition on the building's east and northeast sides from 13 stories down to two- and three-story neighbors is too abrupt, and unacceptable to staff. 

Staff wrote that Baker Barrios' design at this point isn't distinctive or unique enough to warrant such a prime location. They called it "nothing more than a bigger, denser, more massive version of recent mid-rise sisters" like the 420 East apartments and Central Station on Orange.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Jernigan said:

There are a number of design enhancements that Banner has yet to meet that are required for the density bonus, including: a roof line that is sculpted to create an interesting form or enhance the downtown skyline, or alternatively a "green" roof; the primary building entrance must be a prominent feature; use of durable, high-quality materials appropriate for the climate; and placement of the parking garage on the site's interior, or lining it with habitable space along the street. 

The project also doesn't meet criteria of the Downtown Design Guidelines as of now, including: that a new building must be sited in a way that complements existing adjacent buildings; the height-and-mass transition from existing buildings to a new one should be gradual; and that high-density buildings next to residential neighborhoods must step down in height.

Currently, the transition on the building's east and northeast sides from 13 stories down to two- and three-story neighbors is too abrupt, and unacceptable to staff. 

Staff wrote that Baker Barrios' design at this point isn't distinctive or unique enough to warrant such a prime location. They called it "nothing more than a bigger, denser, more massive version of recent mid-rise sisters" like the 420 East apartments and Central Station on Orange.

I think the City is partly wrong.  We're downtown.  So what about the abrupt transition from 13 stories down to 2 or 3; they've got an integrated parking deck to the east that's just a few stories tall.  101 Eola doesn't step down. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On a positive note, the scale down requirement will likely eliminate the useless plaza because that space will be needed to "scale up" the building from the residential structures to the east.

I wish the design board had cared this much when 420 was under review, but then again, they werent contending with the residents of Lake Eola heights.

Edited by prahaboheme
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, prahaboheme said:

On a positive note, the scale down requirement will likely eliminate the useless plaza because that space will be needed to "scale up" the building from the residential structures to the east.

I wish the design board had cared this much when 420 was under review, but then again, they werent contending with the residents of Lake Eola heights.

You nailed it. South Eola has long been mostly rentals (going back to when the retirement high rises were built and it was the gay cruising district every night.) Meanwhile, Eola Heights was one of the first downtown 'hoods to gentrify and solidified to owner-occupied once the stricter zoning requirements went into place in the late '80s.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, jrs2 said:

I think the City is partly wrong.  We're downtown.  So what about the abrupt transition from 13 stories down to 2 or 3; they've got an integrated parking deck to the east that's just a few stories tall.  101 Eola doesn't step down. 

Yeah... I'd say they're fully wrong. Its a reasonable proposal as is. I personally don't mind the plaza... it can be possibly used for events, parts of it could be fenced off and used for outdoor seating for the businesses, it could become a mini-public park or a small makeshift outdoor venue, etc... I too am of the opinion this could end up killing the project

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, popsiclebrandon said:

I really want to know if these are related. Please write your Orlando book already.

Thankfully, the only way they were related was that downtown was dead so land was cheap for the towers and the neighbors weren't the type to complain about cars circling the block for hours on end after midnight. When I lived at The Plaza (now Post Parkside) in the 80s, I used to have parties with binoculars to watch the goings on from my 5th floor perch.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In this case, the step-back requirement is silly. If we're taking into account parking decks, churches, and law offices, then half of our current high-rises couldn't be built. The closest single-family homes are over a block away:

setback.thumb.JPG.0fb5e37872a9b40234e0472b7b2e827b.JPG

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I were designing this project, I would put the density toward downtown with a significantly taller "Flatiron" type building on the corner facing downtown and plaza on the northwest corner to tie into the courthouse and Lymmo area, streetwall with retail along Rosalind curve, and parking garage on the southeast corner, entrance off of Livingston stepping up to the main building to appease the Eola Heights residents.

I am no architect or urban planner, however, I just play one on the Internet. 

Edited by dcluley98
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, alex said:

In this case, the step-back requirement is silly. If we're taking into account parking decks, churches, and law offices, then half of our current high-rises couldn't be built. The closest single-family homes are over a block away:

setback.thumb.JPG.0fb5e37872a9b40234e0472b7b2e827b.JPG

Yeah, looking at this overhead... I forgot the garages for Blue 1 & 2 were right there; I thought it was houses.  Therefore, I recant what I said, and fully agree with you that The City...was smoking something good when they made that decision...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I say use that curve in the road to your advantage to create a unique building. The Townhomes and Incorporated parking garage can serve as the "step down".  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, RedStar25 said:

I say use that curve in the road to your advantage to create a unique building. The Townhomes and Incorporated parking garage can serve as the "step down".  

I'm thinking a taller, single tower with no perpendicular wings, that conforms to the sort of wavy curve in the road and comes right up next to it. Let any plazas, pool decks and garages be on the east side, adjacent to Livingston.

Edited by JFW657
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
50 minutes ago, JFW657 said:

I'm thinking a taller, single tower with no perpendicular wings, that conforms to the sort of wavy curve in the road and comes right up next to it. Let any plazas, pool decks and garages be on the east side, adjacent to Livingston.

...maybe like that wavy shaped hotel proposal for Lake Nona by Architectonica?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, jrs2 said:

...maybe like that wavy shaped hotel proposal for Lake Nona by Architectonica?

I was thinking of something more along the lines of The Waverly. The curves or waves on the Lake Nona design go horizontally across the width of the building, whereas, in order to conform to the curve in Rosalind Ave, the curve(s) would have to run vertically across the height.

Maybe something along the lines of this...

copan.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was hoping for use of the irregular shape all along. How about a steamship moderne design ala the Fountainbleu in Miami? Nice curves there...

I don't think the Paramount gets enough credit for just how well the Art Deco revival style works in Orlando.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By HankStrong
      https://orlando.novusagenda.com/AgendaWeb/AttachmentViewer.ashx?AttachmentID=88733&ItemID=49208
      Just a link to the MPB staff report.
      I combined Ph 2 tower and Ph 3 former Church Street Station re-work as it seems they are both ramping up to start.
       
       
       
    • By BeagleAccountant
      The city council retreat is underway. Ryan Murphy of The Pilot is live tweeting from it. There is a lot of development discussion and focus in here to unpack. I am pretty new here but one development I may have missed or have never seen mentioned is a senior living development next to the fire station.
      Here is the first post of the thread;
      And here's the post referencing the senior living development;
       
    • By 757Duke
      Dollar Tree is adding 600 jobs and expanding their headquarters. They said they will be building the "tallest building" in Chesapeake. Pictures in the article look to be a town center style environment within the Grennbrier area.
      http://pilotonline.com/business/dollar-tree-to-expand-in-chesapeake-adding-jobs-and-tallest/article_d733d431-6501-588b-8f59-9dc80e87154c.html
    • By 23320
      Armada Hoffler proposing land swap for City Hall relocation to Town Center
    • By pgsinger
      I wanted to post a thread on this to see if anyone else was interested, curious, or knowledgeable about prefab homes.  My girlfriend and I are considering either a major addition to our home or demoing the structure and building a custom home.  I understood prefab to be better built due to the ability to build in a controlled environment, but also cheaper due to the economies of scale achieved by building similar homes in one location.  This would be especially true for the modular homes.  However, I am finding many of the prefab homes are priced in the $350-$500/sqft. range, excluding land costs!  One company (Turkel Design) gave me a quote for $143 for site work costs, which would include running the plumbing, electrical, installing the cabinetry, etc.   The materials (drywall, cabinets, counters, appliances, etc.) come as part of another $150,000 line item for the budget.  The big issue I am having is comparing apples-to-apples.  How do I confirm what a comparable house would cost to build on site?
      Does anyone have an personal experience with these types of homes or projects?
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.