Sign in to follow this  
WAJAS98

Trails / Bicycle Infrastructure

Recommended Posts

A thread dedicated to discussions on Orlando and Central Florida trails and bicycle infrastructure.

 

The Cady Way Trail stops at the entrance to Lake Druid Park as it approaches Downtown.  If it was just extended to the cul-de-sac of Laura Pl, then it would connect to the Bumby Trail by a small local road, which is a perfect compromise instead of an actual trail.

 

Trail on the right and Laura Pl on the left.

Capture.PNG

Edited by WAJAS98
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


If you all want to try an epic route that combines some of the longest dedicated bike trails in the area, try this ride I did a couple years ago on Thanksgiving Day:
 

Cranksgiving Day Parade.png

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The Cady Way Trail stops at the entrance to Lake Druid Park as it approaches Downtown.  If it was just extended to the cul-de-sac of Laura Pl, then it would connect to the Bumby Trail by a small local road, which is a perfect compromise instead of an actual trail.
 
Trail on the right and Laura Pl on the left.
Capture.thumb.PNG.8df34f93784a90645e9d451e99dc2c06.PNG

I believe that location at the entrance to Lake Druid Park is where the on-street route to the Orlando Urban Trail begins. There are signs that guide riders through Colonialtown North over to the OUT near Lake Highland Prep, where you can either go north to Mead Gardens or south to downtown.

The new Bumby connector is a great way for cyclists and pedestrians to get to Audubon Park.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's crazy that this whole thing could be built for less than the cost of most of the unnecessary highway projects in Orlando.  The 408 extension is completely unnecessary. the 417 north and south extensions are also completely unnecessary.

54 minutes ago, castorvx said:

Looking forward to the completion of this:

Coast-to-Coast-Connector-Map.png

 

and this!

http://www.greenway.org/pdf/map_mefl.pdf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎4‎/‎29‎/‎2017 at 3:59 PM, WAJAS98 said:

The 408 extension is completely unnecessary

I'm not sure if you mean East end or West end, but I strongly disagree with them not being necessary. 

ESPECIALLY the East end.  It's a nightmare to go East of the current end of the 408.  An absolute traffic nightmare.

Edited by HankStrong

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, HankStrong said:

I'm not sure if you mean East end or West end, but I strongly disagree with them not being necessary. 

ESPECIALLY the East end.  It's a nightmare to go East of the current end of the 408.  An absolute traffic nightmare.

 

I was specifically referring to west.  My main concern with the east extension is that it will spawn new sprawl.  Orlando really needs to start limiting the mega-developments along its outskirts.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, HankStrong said:

I'm not sure if you mean East end or West end, but I strongly disagree with them not being necessary. 

ESPECIALLY the East end.  It's a nightmare to go East of the current end of the 408.  An absolute traffic nightmare.

I liked the option with a widened Colonial and elevated 408 toll lanes running in the middle in a similar setup to what is being done to I-4. That was one proposal brought up but unfortunately fell through. Seemed like the least invasive option, all other options require carving out new ROW through environmentally sensitive areas. I support the 408 extension eastward, it is much needed but I am really hoping it doesn't translate to more leapfrogging, traffic-choked sprawl east of the Econ River.

 

33 minutes ago, WAJAS98 said:

I was specifically referring to west.  My main concern with the east extension is that it will spawn new sprawl.  Orlando really needs to start limiting the mega-developments along its outskirts.

I'm not aware of such a plan for a westward extension... do they want to extend it to US 27? I don't see how it could be extended fairly easily. I imagine it would have to share ROW with the 429 and possibly the Turnpike and then possibly run along Stoneybrook/Marsh Road to US 27. Either way I don't see this extension as necessary as the eastern one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, WAJAS98 said:

I was specifically referring to west.  My main concern with the east extension is that it will spawn new sprawl.  Orlando really needs to start limiting the mega-developments along its outskirts.

Are you talking of taking the 408 to the coast? I don't see the Mormons giving up more land than they absolutely have to, and probably to aquire more land so that the drive to the coast would be a real "Greenway". The more options to tie the space coast, the better I think.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember seeing a map with a 408 west extension not too long ago.  It didn't go too far, but it would have the same problem I have with the west extension.  The only redeeming quality about the west extension is that it is the only new highway that Orlando should need for a long while.  Colonial is a nightmare over there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Boomer136 said:

Are you talking of taking the 408 to the coast? I don't see the Mormons giving up more land than they absolutely have to, and probably to aquire more land so that the drive to the coast would be a real "Greenway". The more options to tie the space coast, the better I think.

The main chunk of Deseret Ranch (AKA "The Mormons") is along the 528.  The name on the OCPA site is "Farmland Reserve Inc" and it looks like they do own 2 parcels up on 50 where this Eastern part of the project would run, but those parcels are nothing like the 528 parcels.  They also own some huge parcels along 520 but those aren't involved in the expansion as it is currently proposed.

The 2 parcels on 50 aren't even in the current proposal, because that stops at 520.

Getting it all the way to I-95 would be ideal, though.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Updated plans for Orlando Mountain Bike Park (OMBP) at Lake Druid Park.  The MPB report is here: http://www.cityoforlando.net/city-planning/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2017/04/MPBStaffReport2017-04_MPL2017-00010.pdf

The new plans call for "Construction of playground, tot lot, shade shelters, rest rooms, and lake overlook; expansion of bike single track. Grading and completion of 10-ft. wide bike path."

The 10 ft wide bike path will be for connection of the parking lot and the CadyWay trail extension to the park amenities such as the new restrooms (much needed and hopefully includes a bike wash station), community Garden, Dog Park, Pavilions, Pump Track, and Lake Overlook.  My favorite part: the singletrack planned expansion to the north of the current limits of the site. Currently, the single track is a rather tame approximately 1 mile loop, with a chainlink fence separating it from the rest of the wooded area to the north. The new land should allow for probably at least a mile more of singletrack trail to be built on the new land, which was planned as being slightly more advanced sections.

I helped build this park in the early stages, and am stoked to add more trail!  The current loop is pretty short and gets old quick, so more advanced trail in the back would make it much more fun to go spend more time here for advanced riders and allow the kids to progress to a higher level.  Add in some shaded areas and restrooms for extended stays and picnic options, recreational and exercise activities that they added and this park is really shaping up!  Great news, and hope to see this get built soon. . . 

 

Pages from MPBStaffReport2017-04_MPL2017-00010.png

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By kermit
      So its been about 10 years since the Blue Line opened and Charlotte has spent a significant amount of energy talking about how to make the city more walkable and less car dependent. As I think about the walkable portions of Charlotte (Dilworth, Southend, PM, Wesley Heights (needs a grocery store), NoDa, etc.) all of these places were built before cars and they have merely been updated to accommodate modern needs.
      Try as I might I can't think of a single post-war neighborhood in Charlotte that has been made more walkable. Is there any neighborhood outside of the inner ring where walking to the store, school or transit is possible for more than a token few? The Blue Line created little or no change in the neighborhoods south of New Bern. Birkdale-like places seem much more like malls than neighborhoods to me and feel as isolated as a mall -- but I don't spend much time there so correct me if I am wrong. Brightwalk comes to mind as one of the best examples but AFAIK it lacks retail and is basically cutoff from any other neighborhoods by Statesville Ave and 77. LoSo is another place where people now want to walk, but it lacks the necessary infrastructure (sidewalks and transit access). We have even failed at connecting neighborhoods by means other than the car (e.g. crossing from Dilworth to Southend on bike or foot is still kinda hairy).
      So my question is what is missing from the development process? Is it zoning (e.g. lot size, sidewalk width, land use mix)? Transit? Traffic engineering (too many car sewers)? A combination of all or something else entirely?
      Ten years of experience suggests that we have not figured out how to make new walkable burbs -- is it time to give up?  Would giving up be a bad thing?
      EDIT: am I being too pessimistic? Does new multi-family in places like Park Road / Selwyn make new walkability available to some? Please tell me I have overlooked some significant positive change somewhere.
    • By dcluley98
      There is a new ARB Report out on the Colonial Pedestrian Overpass Bridge with renderings and final approval of the lighting plan. http://www.cityoforlando.net/city-planning/wp-content/uploads/sites/27/2017/03/ARB2016-00070report.pdf
      Report says project is scheduled to commence construction First Quarter of 2017.  I can confirm that work has started with site clearing and pile driving. Crews flagged the area and removed multiple trees in the right of way for the project next to SteelHouse this month. I expect sitework to begin and we may see vertical construction soon.  I will keep updates going as the project progresses, as I live in Steelhouse. Renderings below.

      Aerial Plan:

      Lighting Rendering Looking from East to West: 
      Lighting Rendering Looking from West to East: 
      OUT Approach to Bridge from Downtown:

      Truss Uplighting Detail on Span:

      Looks pretty cool.  I just hope they can vary the colors on that Pylon and Ramp. 
    • By DJCortesRVA
      Thought a thread for bicycle-related infrastructural and program developments seemed appropriate. Post any news related cycling in Richmond. Also, feel free to share any articles that were previously shared in broader threads here on bicycles. 
      Just resharing the article on the bike-share program coming to Richmond because I came across another curious article (see 2nd link) on how Milwaukee's bike-share program teamed up with their Housing Authority in order to ensure accessibility to lower- and low income neighborhoods.
      http://www.richmond.com/news/article_63ad34d7-37d2-569e-91f5-a8c0fd2ec28e.html
      http://www.streetsblog.net/2016/07/11/milwaukee-bike-share-teams-up-with-housing-authority-on-system-expansion/
    • By xtianpoop
      While I really want to discuss the mass transportation needs, wants, and woes in Chattanooga, I would also like to see some life brought to this board, and this includes discussions away from residential development and pictures.
      TRANSPORTATION CENTER
      The Multi-modal Transportation Center Study wrapped up its public input this Thursday at the Choo Choo. I was unable to go, but from published photos, you can see one of the sites over at Broad & Main:

      Other potential site locations, according to WTVC U.S. Pipe and the Choo Choo. U.S. Pipe certainly has opportunity, but through talking to some I know, not only are the residential plans moving forward off the S. Broad spot, but the Lookouts are unofficially eyeing the area. I like the idea of the center being downtown, but I am privy to it being in midtown, off central somewhere between Bailey and McCallie.
      U.S. Pipe plans from the past, now getting renewed attention from Southside rebuild, Cameron Harbor, economy picking up, & Riverwalk extension. Past plans:

       
      COMPLETE STREETS
      Efforts have been underway to increase complete streets in the city. We already have a pretty successful bike share system downtown, but recently bike lanes have been added or improved. Veterans Bridge had the lane solidified to meet up to Barton Ave, N Market was just narrowed to two lanes with bike lanes each direction painted, Broad Street currently is having curbs put up to protect the new lanes, and Cherokee may potentially be getting protected lanes. These efforts are to follow into the city. Hwy 158 has been undergoing sidewalk additions, and East Ridge is currently working on their own street improvements. 

       
      LIGHT RAIL
      Hold onto your seats, ladies and gentlemen, because Chattanooga may have a LR coming soon. Compared to other cities, the cost for the LR - using preexisting rails and creating a few new miles of track - will just be pennies in the bucket. From my understanding, support is being sought before they formally begin the process. The LR could change many things for the city. Most notably, class mobility as transportation has been a huge problem for the inner city community. Though with the cheap land and convenient transportation, we could see a lot more gentri Central -> Missionary Ridge, which would confound the problem. 

      Side note: Proponents for national rail travel have highlighted Chattanooga as one of the key pieces to the puzzle. The ATL-CHA high-speed rail conversation has gone on for years, most recently being determined not 'feasible,' but the CHA hub is still important. With Chattanooga getting rail, there's a possible extension outside of the city. Cleveland, Collegedale are two locations, but Nashville would be a consideration. Here is the overall map to see how CHA would play a part. MIA -> CHI route

       
      AIR
      We cannot forget the record growth the CHA airport has been having. Parking is currently under expansion, new routes (direct -> LGA and IAH), cheap fares, and new aviation company planting roots. Great to see the airport better serving the community (and poaching N ATL customers). We would all love parking decks at Lovell Field, but we also all know there isn't near enough a demand for that. Down the road, for sure. Maybe when another terminal opens after we eclipse 400-550k enplanements.
       
      UNRELATED INFRASTRUCTURE
      TN legislators are still upset about the FCC knocking down state line restrictions for municipal broadband, but these battles could be over pretty soon. EPB is being a nice service and not expanding out of their 600 sq mile area, even if they lawfully are able to now. Interesting to note, if only economically. Infrastructure is infrastructure, and currently Chattanooga has one of the smartest grids in the world.

       
      I think this just about covers it? Outside of course our electric shuttles downtown, which I hope they eventually expand further as the density increases outside the core of Riverfront-City Center districts. I love Nashville, and though Chattanooga has a long way to go to reach its congestion (though the city is a major US thoroughfare, especially with freight traffic), I am glad to see the city playing the long game by working to deal with traffic issues through multi-modal & complete street initiatives until we have to, like with Nashville. Urban (& smart) planning are always draws to tourists - look to Philadelphia, Boston - so this type of proactive growth can further have impacts on our growing hospitality industry. It already has (think Vanguard) in many different ways, but density and transportation has a way of strengthening a city's growth all its own. What do you think about where the city is going?