TnNative

Air BnB Legislation

Recommended Posts


2 hours ago, TnNative said:

This could be the death knell of any real neighborhood building. It's becoming Disney Land for drunken tourists who want to experience a "an urban" neighborhood. Total BS -

Met with a city councilman this morning on another development related topic and asked his thoughts regarding this subject.  He was very displeased with the state stepping in (on?), yet again, to city business. Some of our state legislative peeps from the hinterlands are rather destructive - and make poor choices in how they spend their precious time and energy. Beyond understanding. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Flatrock said:

Some of our state legislative peeps from the hinterlands are rather destructive - and make poor choices in how they spend their precious time and energy. Beyond understanding. 

Time isn't necessarily a factor for these legislators; lobbyists have time however.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can cite chapter and verse of urban legislators doing the same....by definition, government overreach is not limited to party or geographical labels. I will have to read the bill to see the justification of state authority over local autonomy. (Edit: if not then it is an overreach).

However, I know you are not naive enough to believe the lobbyists for Nashville's hotels have not been been spending their 'time' influencing our local officials.

Edited by nashville_bound
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

pretty sure we actually said the same thing....

 

11 hours ago, UTgrad09 said:

And I can cite that two wrongs don't make a right.

I don't agree on government overreach at any level.

I think there are some very legitimate concerns from property owners over AirBnB properties disrupting neighborhoods. Anything that infringes on a property owner becomes a larger issue. I have a very hard time believing that a rural lawmaker has any understanding of the implications of this, and it's not a far reach to think that they are voting with money, and not with conscience. 

That said, I think most politicians tend to vote with money and/or their party's favor. There is gamesmanship played by both sides. And it screws all of us. 

 

Both sides need to grow up and do what is in the best interest of Tennesseans...not what is in the best interest of party status quo.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, CenterHill said:

And tonight, folks, rural legislators in the TN House, influenced by Airbnb's army of lobbyists, have just passed a bill saying Nashville, it literally applies ONLY to Nashville, may not enact any legislation that restricts non-owner occupied Short Term Rentals.   A billion dollar industry has literally bought its right to operate commercial businesses in Nashville's residentially zoned neighborhoods.    A sad day.  

Good breakdown of the proceedings here:

 

http://www.nashvillepost.com/politics/legislation/article/20860784/house-passes-nashvilleonly-airbnb-bill

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, donNdonelson2 said:

I expect an immediate legal challenge if this is signed into law.

Now I'm not a...

e395lws.png

...fancy, big-city lawyer but ultimately the state has sovereignty over municipalities, Dillon's Rule and all that.

It doesn't help matters that Nashville, unlike Memphis, Chattanooga, and Knoxville, doesn't operate under a home-rule charter.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Edgefield D said:

TN Senate Finance Committee deferred the bill til 2018. I for one am glad. 

And I for two!  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, PruneTracy said:

Now I'm not a...

e395lws.png

...fancy, big-city lawyer but ultimately the state has sovereignty over municipalities, Dillon's Rule and all that.

It doesn't help matters that Nashville, unlike Memphis, Chattanooga, and Knoxville, doesn't operate under a home-rule charter.

Home rule charters are no panacea for local autonomy, and Nashville's metro charter arguably gives it more local control than Tennessee's weak home rule charters do.  Even when there is a home rule charter, in cases of disagreement, the courts almost always side with states over locals.  Sad that Judge Cooley lost out to Judge Dillon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quote

 

So is there anywhere to see how each state representative voted? I am particular interested in how the representatives that represent the areas that would have been affected (metro Nashville, Knoxville, Memphis, Chattanooga) and the outer laying counties after these locales where taken out of the "mix". I was all for owner occupied. Non owner occupied is an abomination to already established residential neighborhoods. It is troubling that Air BnB and their 7 lobbyist still pushed this just on Nashville when it when it was clear other areas/cities were not going to be affected.

To me, the worse thing about non owner occupied houses is not the possibility of large parties or loud people. It is having empty houses sitting around when no one is there. No one starting families, no neighbors, no kids using the local schools. This is not a residential neighborhood, this is a commercial district. I am trying to raise kids in an urban neighborhood, I want them to have friends and I want to have friends and good neighbors. Unfortunately, the fox has been let into the hen house. Money has been smelled. My opinion, this will absolutely wreck neighborhoods like Lockeland Springs, Edgefield, Germantown. The ones closest to downtown. EDIT: At best, another reason for people to move to the suburbs. At worst - They will become fake neighborhoods.

Edited by TnNative
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, TnNative said:

So is there anywhere to see how each state representative voted? I am particular interested in how the representatives that represent the areas that would have been affected (metro Nashville, Knoxville, Memphis, Chattanooga) and the outer laying counties after these locales where taken out of the "mix". I was all for owner occupied. Non owner occupied is an abomination to already established residential neighborhoods. It is troubling that Air BnB and their 7 lobbyist still pushed this just on Nashville when it when it was clear other areas/cities were not going to be affected.

To me, the worse thing about non owner occupied houses is not the possibility of large parties or loud people. It is having empty houses sitting around when no one is there. No one starting families, no neighbors, no kids using the local schools. This is not a residential neighborhood, this is a commercial district. I am trying to raise kids in an urban neighborhood, I want them to have friends and I want to have friends and good neighbors. Unfortunately, the fox has been let into the hen house. Money has been smelled. My opinion, this will absolutely wreck neighborhoods like Lockeland Springs, Edgefield, Germantown. The ones closest to downtown. They will become fake neighborhoods.

As far as how legislators voted, this is from the Tennesseean article (http://www.tennessean.com/story/news/politics/2017/05/09/short-term-rental-bill-targeting-nashville-delayed-2018/314225001/):

Quote

“This is not a property rights issue, this is a quality of life issue,” said Rep. John Ray Clemmons, D-Nashville, who spoke against the bill at length on Monday.
Nashville's Democratic delegation all voted against the legislation except for Rep. Jason Powell, D-Nashville, who did not vote on the bill. He told The Tennessean that he has a couple of properties operating as short-term rentals and wanted to avoid any conflict.

House Speaker Beth Harwell voted against the legislation as well along with all three of Williamson County's Republican representatives: Glen Casada, Charles Sargent and Sam Whitson.

So at least a few Republicans from areas that would have been affected (if they weren't exempted) did the right thing and voted against it. But not many, because it still ended up 53-35 in favor.

And I agree 100% on the real impact of this not being partiers or whatever. I'm in Lockeland Springs, also with kids looking for playmates, and the houses that are non-owner-occupied AirBnBs are just gaps in the neighborhood. But I don't think we have to give up quite yet (fox, hen house, etc.). There's still a perfectly happy medium on this, which is to allow and/or encourage owner-occupied AirBnBs for those who are interested. I have several neighbors who AirBnB a room, a floor, or a detached garage unit, and it works great. You get a complete neighborhood filled with residents AND the extra money and foot traffic from tourists. AND on-site supervision of any rowdiness that occurs. It's actually somewhat of a return to what the neighborhood was like 100 years ago, when most homeowners let out rooms to renters. And I think it's what Metro's going to be shooting for if the state doesn't override them.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, AronG said:

As far as how legislators voted, this is from the Tennesseean article (http://www.tennessean.com/story/news/politics/2017/05/09/short-term-rental-bill-targeting-nashville-delayed-2018/314225001/):

So at least a few Republicans from areas that would have been affected (if they weren't exempted) did the right thing and voted against it. But not many, because it still ended up 53-35 in favor.

And I agree 100% on the real impact of this not being partiers or whatever. I'm in Lockeland Springs, also with kids looking for playmates, and the houses that are non-owner-occupied AirBnBs are just gaps in the neighborhood. But I don't think we have to give up quite yet (fox, hen house, etc.). There's still a perfectly happy medium on this, which is to allow and/or encourage owner-occupied AirBnBs for those who are interested. I have several neighbors who AirBnB a room, a floor, or a detached garage unit, and it works great. You get a complete neighborhood filled with residents AND the extra money and foot traffic from tourists. AND on-site supervision of any rowdiness that occurs. It's actually somewhat of a return to what the neighborhood was like 100 years ago, when most homeowners let out rooms to renters. And I think it's what Metro's going to be shooting for if the state doesn't override them.

Agree with this. My condo building does not allow short term rentals, although we did have some owners attempt to AirBnb their places. The guest were usually quiet and fine, but occasionally loud and disruptive. It is a quality of life issue. I think with the massive influx of new hotels this will drive the profitability of AirBnbs down in this city, creating less incentive for non-owner occupied units.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, AronG said:

You get a complete neighborhood filled with residents AND the extra money and foot traffic from tourists. AND on-site supervision of any rowdiness that occurs. It's actually somewhat of a return to what the neighborhood was like 100 years ago, when most homeowners let out rooms to renters. And I think it's what Metro's going to be shooting for if the state doesn't override them.

It is.   Metro's current ordinance allows Type I (owner occupied), Type II (non-owner occupied) and Type III (multi-tenant) and allows them to operate in any zoning district.  Type II's have a limit of 3% per census tract (which codes does not really enforce).    Council's proposed amendment to the ordinance that Airbnb is fighting and is trying to persuade the state to preempt, would only address Type IIs operating in residentially-zoned neighborhoods R, RS and a few other designations).   Type II permits would be gradually phased out of residential neighborhoods after 2 years.   

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.