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I doubt Belmont will ever overtake Gastonia.  Gastonia added roughly 6k residents over the last decade, and Belmont added about 2.5k.  I guess if the Silver Line ended up terminating in Belmont, it could bring an influx of people there, but I don't think Belmont wants a ton of growth.  Gastonia seems to be trying to take the next step by bringing entertainment to its downtown, and in the long run that will likely bring in larger scale redevelopment similar to what's going on in Kannapolis.

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Charlotte’s Historical Population Census                 Population 1800                       276                         (In 1800, Charlotte was NC’s 8th largest city/town behind (1)

The 15th annual edition of Demographia World Urban Areas: 2019 has just been released.  The DWUA-2019 claims that there are 1,072 "built-up urban areas" or "urban agglomerations" in the world with a p

I suspect this may be a case of "you get what you pay for"...

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The biggest problem with Gastonia is that its CBD/ downtown is incredibly piecemeal, and not well-activated in the majority of blocks. Yes, it's made some great strides in the past few years, revitalizing the area near the courthouse, but at the end of the day it suffers terribly from this AND its poor connectivity to Charlotte (I-85 loses a lane before it even gets CLOSE to central Gaston, and anyone who's taken the Sloans Ferry Bridge that carries 74 across the Catawba knows it is a *scary* piece of road and in no way a fostering agent for growth).

Given Belmont's raw proximity to Meck, and its great work w/ revitalization in the past 20-some-dd years, i don't see it being impossible at all that Belmont becomes the next powerhouse of Gaston and might absolutely pass Gastonia in population. it won't be tomorrow, or next year, but it's definitely a place to watch.

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I am seeing more and more California plated cars in Charlotte than ever.  Californians once stayed west and moved to Nevada and Arizona and other Mtn west states now they are moving all over the sunbelt to even here in NC

Look at the Bay area counties and Los Angeles counties   why this does not show where they went they are moving to the southeast primarily NC GA and FL and TN.  

CalExodus: Are People Leaving California? – California Policy Lab (capolicylab.org)

always have seen some California plates in Raleigh Durham but now even here.  This is a real migration out of the state.   

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https://smartasset.com/financial-advisor/where-retirees-are-moving-2021

"The Carolinas" are a solid second place with over 33K retirees.  Oh, and by the way, there is a state income tax in NC.  So -- people are moving to NC because it's so awesome.  

(Snicker....where's Georgia on the retiree lists?  Cue clown sad music.)

 

 

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5 minutes ago, CLT2014 said:

I think Charlotte's rank as a top net-importer of retirees is influenced by the amount of young transplants.  We aren't necessarily the stereotypical "resort" retirement location. Instead their kids moved to Charlotte after college for work, stayed here, met a person, got pregnant, moved from South End to Cotswold to raise said baby... and grandma and grandpa come down from Pittsburgh to meet the baby. They go back home and go "dang, we are never going to know our grandchild and it is freezing here in Pittsburgh." Three months later, the house is sold and grandpa and grandma have a nice townhome in South Park. 

Our millennial or Gen Z growth has a "revolving" door to an extent, but many more seem to settle down here than places like San Francisco and New York where it is a "phase of life in the city" and people fully intend to move somewhere else when they settle down, marry, and have a kid (if applicable to their life). This causes a pull on the older generation as well to move in proximity. 

Hah!  This is essentially what happened with my family and my in-laws!  But they were moving from Louisiana to get away from hurricanes.

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7 hours ago, CLT2014 said:

I think Charlotte's rank as a top net-importer of retirees is influenced by the amount of young transplants.  We aren't necessarily the stereotypical "resort" retirement location. Instead their kids moved to Charlotte after college for work, stayed here, met a person, got pregnant, moved from South End to Cotswold to raise said baby... and grandma and grandpa come down from Pittsburgh to meet the baby. They go back home and go "dang, we are never going to know our grandchild and it is freezing here in Pittsburgh." Three months later, the house is sold and grandpa and grandma have a nice townhome in South Park. 

Our millennial or Gen Z growth has a "revolving" door to an extent, but many more seem to settle down here than places like San Francisco and New York where it is a "phase of life in the city" and people fully intend to move somewhere else when they settle down, marry, and have a kid (if applicable to their life). This causes a pull on the older generation as well to move in proximity. 

I’ve mentioned this elsewhere before but this was my precise scenario.  I moved here from NY in 1994 and parents retired, left NY and relo’d to Ballantyne a couple years ago.  I have other friends who came around that same mid-90s timeframe, and now one’s parents are halfbacks from FL (originally from Pittsburgh) living in Weddington and the others are from Ft Lauderdale that moved up here to Oakhurst.  And brought their grandson too.  
 

My mom’s brother and his wife live in SFO and when he retires they want out.  They can’t afford to stay there on retirement income, so they will likely come too in the next few years.  It’s highly possible that our old neighbors from NY may move in the next few years.  This is real. 
 

 

Edited by turbocraig
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16 hours ago, CLT2014 said:

I think Charlotte's rank as a top net-importer of retirees is influenced by the amount of young transplants.  We aren't necessarily the stereotypical "resort" retirement location. Instead their kids moved to Charlotte after college for work, stayed here, met a person, got pregnant, moved from South End to Cotswold to raise said baby... and grandma and grandpa come down from Pittsburgh to meet the baby. They go back home and go "dang, we are never going to know our grandchild and it is freezing here in Pittsburgh." Three months later, the house is sold and grandpa and grandma have a nice townhome in South Park. 

Our millennial or Gen Z growth has a "revolving" door to an extent, but many more seem to settle down here than places like San Francisco and New York where it is a "phase of life in the city" and people fully intend to move somewhere else when they settle down, marry, and have a kid (if applicable to their life). This causes a pull on the older generation as well to move in proximity. 

Yep.  While my parents haven't fully gotten on board for moving here *yet*, they get closer every year.  It one thing to live in PA and not know first hand of the much better weather here.  But when your son (me) texts mom and dad in PA about working outside on the deck in shorts and t-shirt (me, yesterday), it hits home for them and they complain non-stop.  Major point of issue for my parents in PA is that they are country folks and the city scares them!

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On 3/10/2021 at 3:43 PM, CLT2014 said:

I think Charlotte's rank as a top net-importer of retirees is influenced by the amount of young transplants.  We aren't necessarily the stereotypical "resort" retirement location. Instead their kids moved to Charlotte after college for work, stayed here, met a person, got pregnant, moved from South End to Cotswold to raise said baby... and grandma and grandpa come down from Pittsburgh to meet the baby. They go back home and go "dang, we are never going to know our grandchild and it is freezing here in Pittsburgh." Three months later, the house is sold and grandpa and grandma have a nice townhome in South Park. 

Our millennial or Gen Z growth has a "revolving" door to an extent, but many more seem to settle down here than places like San Francisco and New York where it is a "phase of life in the city" and people fully intend to move somewhere else when they settle down, marry, and have a kid (if applicable to their life). This causes a pull on the older generation as well to move in proximity. 

My girlfriend's mom is a rich retired and divorced lawyer from Louisville, KY. She moved down here and is renting to take care of her other daughter's baby as both her and her husband are working. Though she plans to move back, my girlfriend has taken a liking to the city and plans to stay. Even when people move here temporarily, they can leave behind people who fall in love with the city, or in many cases might end up staying themselves.

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10 hours ago, InSouthPark said:

Yep.  While my parents haven't fully gotten on board for moving here *yet*, they get closer every year.  It one thing to live in PA and not know first hand of the much better weather here.  But when your son (me) texts mom and dad in PA about working outside on the deck in shorts and t-shirt (me, yesterday), it hits home for them and they complain non-stop.  Major point of issue for my parents in PA is that they are country folks and the city scares them!

Waxhaw would be perfect for them!

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I live in eastern NC and the same plays out here. Most come down to visit children in the military, discover the New Berns, Swansboros, and Beauforts, and it's a wrap. Mostly from Ohio, Penn, and New Jersey.

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On 3/11/2021 at 6:58 PM, CLT2014 said:

Waxhaw would be perfect for them!

Waxhaw is booming but there are other towns too like Locust, Oakboro etc.  South of Waxhaw is very rural and you can come into "town" to shop and eat.  

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4 hours ago, KJHburg said:

Waxhaw is booming but there are other towns too like Locust, Oakboro etc.  South of Waxhaw is very rural and you can come into "town" to shop and eat.  

Yeah I agree. Waxhaw isn’t as rural anymore.  If you are looking for rural that is somewhat near Charlotte I’d say Locust, Midland, Albemarle, Lincolnton, Harrisburg, Chester, Kings Mountain, Shelby, and York.  They will grow eventually too but not as fast since they are further out. 

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