Jump to content
kermit

Political Digression Thread -- Save UP! Move the politically focused stuff here

Recommended Posts

Duke Energy working hard to prop up our anti-urban legislature through political donations...

 

BFD43C51-FD61-4A5E-9178-D034A35958EE.png

Edited by kermit
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Georgia Trending Blue Faster than NC?  No.   GA may be starting to "trend Blue" because of changes in its demographics, but barely.  

First of all, the Presidential election was decided by a razor thin margin of 12000 votes.  (Obama won NC by more votes in 2008).  Interestingly, there were over 500,000 fewer votes than NC cast.  the only reason Georgia trended Blue in 2020 was the relentless 24/7 coverage of Georgia by every media outlet on the planet and daily visits to the state by Democratic leaders who, along with private donations, flooded into the state at an unprecedented rate.  Even so, the margins of victory in GA for President, and the two Senate seats were paltry and pathetic at best given the amount of energy, money and attention exerted.  Compared this to NC which was visited by Biden or Harris just 4 times in 6 weeks with zero media attention and Trump, who visited NC once or twice a week...with almost zero resistance from the DNC and its affiliates and major drops by the RNC and its affiliates in NC markets.  NC also had Senate candidate who suffered from self-inflicted wounds but even so, barely died of these wounds losing by less than 100,000 votes out of nearly 6 million cast.   And, then, there's the local and state elections.  Did Democratic candidates do better in NC or GA?  What were their margins of victory?   

More numbers:  between the 2016 and 2020 Presidential candidates, the difference in votes received was higher for Dems in boths states: NC +505K / GA +596K .  For the GOP it was NC +396K / GA +372.  I think this is more evidence that it was amount of attention and money spent to get votes over the line.  I think Cunningham's moral high ground stance vs. badly timed shenanigans hurt Democrats across the ballot in NC.  Even more telling, politically, was how little Cooper was hurt by his response to Covid vs. Georgia's where its response to the pandemic was the opposite of NC and nearly as bad as Sweden (NC, GA, and Sweden are roughly the same population with three different approaches.  Guess which one has the fewest deaths and cases -- by far - of the three?).  Turns out that Cooper's approach wasn't as catastrophic to the state's GDP as was Georgia's.  Our economy shrink by almost a full point less than Georgia's with stricter rules.  Go figure.  

The amount of resources, energy, and attention poured into Georgia by Democrats is something I've never seen in 50 years.  Georgia isn't trending bluer faster -- it just shows that when media attention, money, and party activity is laser focused on a state in such an unprecedented way, you had better win.  In the case of Georgia, they barely won.  

Speaking of demographics, I don' t know that either party can count on reliable monolithic voting blocks based on race, religion, sexuality, sex, ethnicity, etc., anymore, but that's a different subject.  

Edited by Phillydog
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/1/2021 at 2:42 PM, Phillydog said:

Georgia Trending Blue Faster than NC?  No.   GA may be starting to "trend Blue" because of changes in its demographics, but barely.  

Georgia isn't trending bluer faster -- it just shows that when media attention, money, and party activity is laser focused on a state in such an unprecedented way, you had better win.  In the case of Georgia, they barely won.   

GA is much more urban (3/4) than NC (2/3). NC has one of the largest rural populations of any state (2nd only to TX?, though TX also trending more urban faster than NC). Eastern NC areas still trended right in 2020, offsetting suburban realignment in the high-growth metros. Atlanta has become such a large metro that GA could be a major realignment, like CO and VA past cycles, and AZ this cycle.  Still, I think GA remains competitive, especially if its rural areas haven't reached a floor or suburban areas swing.

Edited by southslider

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/2/2021 at 8:01 PM, atl2clt said:

Also wanted to chime in here. 

First, I'm a lawyer. Also, I might add, one largely educated in Georgia. 

Second, you are undoubtedly lying when you said you read the bill's full text. The bill is 98 pages long. Without legal training in legislative history, statutory interpretation and election law, you cannot and will not understand this law. Guaranteed. Take, for instance, the following provision in Section 27(b) (which amends Code Section 21-2-384): "The larger of the two envelopes to be enclosed within the mailing envelope shall be printed contain the form of oath of the elector and the oath for persons assisting electors, as provided for in Code Section 21-2-409, and the penalties provided for in Code Sections 21-2-568, 21-2-573, 1294 21-2-579, and 21-2-599 for violations of oaths..."

You understand that? No you don't. I'm trained in this stuff and I don't even understand it. 

Third, this article is helpful in summarizing/annotating the legalese: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/02/us/politics/georgia-voting-law-annotated.html

Fourth, this is the free market in action. The MLB is a private organization. It basically said, "we're a private organization, and as a private organization, we feel it is on our best long-term interests to distance ourselves from Georgia's recent political actions." This isn't about cancel culture. It's about capitalism. You're just upset that capitalism didn't sit idly by this time. 

No doubt, this is a calculated business/marketing decision by the MLB. They weighed the financial costs and benefits, and capitalism determined that your side lost.  Sorry.

Are you saying the poster is not educated enough to understand the bill because they may not be a Lawyer? The average reader can read 100 pages in 2.8 hours. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/10/2021 at 8:53 AM, kermit said:

Duke Energy working hard to prop up our anti-urban legislature through political donations...

 

BFD43C51-FD61-4A5E-9178-D034A35958EE.png

So it's okay for the MLB to boycott GA, but it's not okay for Duke to give to the GOP?

 

So much hypocrisy on both sides. Thank the heavens i'm a Independent. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/7/2021 at 9:42 PM, urbanlover568 said:

So it's okay for the MLB to boycott GA, but it's not okay for Duke to give to the GOP?

When did I say it wasn't OK?

Why shouldn't we know about the political proclivities of the companies we give our money to? Is transparency not a good thing? And in this case Duke is regulated by the same politicians they are contributing to, so it seems particularly important that we know about these relationships.

Edited by kermit
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, kermit said:

When did I say it wasn't OK?

Why shouldn't we know about the political proclivities of the companies we give our money to? Is transparency not a good thing? And in this case Duke is regulated by the same politicians they are contributing to, so it seems particularly important that we know about these connections.

(I am also glad to be without political affiliation)

We should know where money is flowing to. I never said the opposite. The hypocrisy on both sides is baffling.  Biden okaying the NBA boycott and Mcconnel okaying companies giving political donations. Both choices infuriating the opposite party. 

 

Quote

There is nothing which I dread so much as a division of the republic into two great parties, each arranged under its leader, and concerting measures in opposition to each other. This, in my humble apprehension, is to be dreaded as the greatest political evil under our Constitution.

John Adams

 

Quote

The alternate domination of one faction over another, sharpened by the spirit of revenge, natural to party dissension, which in different ages and countries has perpetrated the most horrid enormities, is itself a frightful despotism. But this leads at length to a more formal and permanent despotism. The disorders and miseries, which result, gradually incline the minds of men to seek security and repose in the absolute power of an individual; and sooner or later the chief of some prevailing faction, more able or more fortunate than his competitors, turns this disposition to the purposes of his own elevation, on the ruins of Public Liberty

Without looking forward to an extremity of this kind, (which nevertheless ought not to be entirely out of sight,) the common and continual mischiefs of the spirit of party are sufficient to make it the interest and duty of a wise people to discourage and restrain it.

It serves always to distract the Public Councils, and enfeeble the Public Administration. It agitates the Community with ill-founded jealousies and false alarms; kindles the animosity of one part against another, foments occasionally riot and insurrection. It opens the door to foreign influence and corruption, which find a facilitated access to the government itself through the channels of party passions. Thus the policy and the will of one country are subjected to the policy and will of another.

There is an opinion, that parties in free countries are useful checks upon the administration of the Government, and serve to keep alive the spirit of Liberty. This within certain limits is probably true; and in Governments of a Monarchical cast, Patriotism may look with indulgence, if not with favor, upon the spirit of party. But in those of the popular character, in Governments purely elective, it is a spirit not to be encouraged. From their natural tendency, it is certain there will always be enough of that spirit for every salutary purpose. And, there being constant danger of excess, the effort ought to be, by force of public opinion, to mitigate and assuage it. A fire not to be quenched, it demands a uniform vigilance to prevent its bursting into a flame, lest, instead of warming, it should consume.

George Washington

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/7/2021 at 8:20 PM, urbanlover568 said:

Are you saying the poster is not educated enough to understand the bill because they may not be a Lawyer? The average reader can read 100 pages in 2.8 hours. 

Okay, let's assume I read 100 pages of a medical textbook in 2.8 hours. Are you implying that I am qualified to understand this material despite having no training in medical studies? 

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, atl2clt said:

Okay, let's assume I read 100 pages of a medical textbook in 2.8 hours. Are you implying that I am qualified to understand this material despite having no training in medical studies? 

 

Pin by Julia V. Taylor on Quotes, Poems, and Other Things. | Best  inspirational quotes, Inspirational quotes, Powerful quotes

  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, atl2clt said:

Okay, let's assume I read 100 pages of a medical textbook in 2.8 hours. Are you implying that I am qualified to understand this material despite having no training in medical studies? 

Now...now...you're dealing with a bunch of American  Geniuses on that side of the universe.  I might agree if he were referring to Dr. Suess (cat in the hat).  Hell, I deal with technical legalize all day in the Energy Regulatory Cyber Security enivronemnt and it takes months/years for "SMEs" to make sense of a lot of the legalise.  The average person would  probably read 10 pages and be ready to a long walk off a short pier.

That lol ranks right up there with a ton of wtf statements from 1600 Pennsylvania Ave, circa 2016-2020.

Edited by Durhamite
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Durhamite said:

Now...now...you're dealing with a bunch of American  Geniuses on that side of the universe.  I might agree if he were referring to Dr. Suess (cat in the hat).  Hell, I deal with technical legalize all day in the Energy Regulatory Cyber Security enivronemnt and it takes years for the average person to make sense to minimum legalise.  The average person would  probably read 10 pages and be ready to long walk off a short pier.

That lol ranks right up there with a ton of wtf statements from 1600 Pennsylvania Ave, circa 2016-2020.

Yes, Americans are dumb as rocks, right? We are too stupid to understand anything or learn any information. 

  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, urbanlover568 said:

Yes, Americans are dumb as rocks, right? We are too stupid to understand anything or learn any information. 

No, the issue is deceit. 

When a poster says, "I read a whole statute in one sitting and now I understand it", that person is lying. 

This isn't about making people feel stupid. It's about recognizing when people are lying, and then notifying others of their deceit. 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, atl2clt said:

No, the issue is deceit. 

When a poster says, "I read a whole statute in one sitting and now I understand it", that person is lying. 

This isn't about making people feel stupid. It's about recognizing when people are lying, and then notifying others of their deceit. 

 

I think you may not be QUALIFIED enough to make that statement. Where is your PhD in Psychology? 

  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.