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DaGABoyStinger

New North GA Area Code

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On June 16, 2005, the Georgia Public Service commission is going to meet on it's feaseability. If accepted, this overlay will affect all minor and major cities in this region, such as: Augusta, Athens, and Columbus.

For More info: Click Here

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I think that the new area code is needed, and I understand that an overlay would just make the transistions easier, but could you might as well just split the codes so that at least on a local level, we can keep our 7-digit dialing?

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I think that the new area code is needed, and I understand that an overlay would just make the transistions easier, but could you might as well just split the codes so that at least on a local level, we can keep our 7-digit dialing?

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You could keep your 7-digit dialing, but half of you would still lose your area code. (Flip a coin to see who would get to keep the old code. ;) ) Many areas of the country are moving to 10 digit dialing (particularly in larger metro areas), and many cell phones are 10-digit dialing anyway. It is much less invasive than changing entire contact lists and phone books, as well as trying to guess if a particular number is in the old area code or the new one.

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Would it make more sense for Columbus to get its own area code? It makes more sense geographically. I do see why overlays can be helpful sometimes, but it is not much a good thing.

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Would it make more sense for Columbus to get its own area code? It makes more sense geographically.  I do see why overlays can be helpful sometimes, but it is not much a good thing.

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Actually, area code 706 is in an odd setup anyway, since it is one of (I believe) only three area codes that are discontiguous (i.e., split into two separate areas). The other ones are 423 in eastern Tennessee and 386 in northeast Florida. I suppose that they thought about splitting 706 into "Columbus/LaGrange" and "Rome/Dalton/Athens/Augusta/everywhere else," but the numbers and projections must not have added up. They probably decided that split would have left northwest/northeast Georgia running out of numbers again in too short a time while leaving Columbus not in danger of running out of any numbers at all.

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For some clarification- here is a map of the area codes in GA:

ga.gif

It seems to me that 229 and 478 were added at the same time.

I agree that it would make more sense for Columbus to have its own area code. An overlay for just the 706 seems unnecessary, but I guess these guys know what they are doing.

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It seems to me that 229 and 478 were added at the same time.

I agree that it would make more sense for Columbus to have its own area code. An overlay for just the 706 seems unnecessary, but I guess these guys know what they are doing.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

When they look at creating a new area code, the most important things are still going to be the population estimates and projected demand for phone numbers. Geography is trivial because it is all done electronically anyway. Just change a few settings in all of the central office equipment and they are ready for the new area code. (They would have to do that regardless of whether it is a split or an overlay.) They really don't care what looks right on the map, just how quickly each of the phone company's rate centers are going to run out of phone numbers. That is what lead to the original weird split of 404/706.

Also, the 912/478/229 split did occur all at once.

Besides, with the current voip growth estimates, in about 10-20 years all of the area codes will be mangled together anyway. :whistling:

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For some clarification- here is a map of the area codes in GA:

ga.gif

It seems to me that 229 and 478 were added at the same time.

I agree that it would make more sense for Columbus to have its own area code. An overlay for just the 706 seems unnecessary, but I guess these guys know what they are doing.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Is 440 one of Atlanta's area codes? If so, the map is inaccurate.

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I apologize.  440 has been in my head for too long.  Is it 470 instead?

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Nope, it's 404. That's the original area code for the metro until 770 came 15 years ago.

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It think the time where area codes depicted a geographic location is quickly passing. They were originally invented for DDD (direct distant dialing) so the electromechanical equipment in use in the 60s and 70s could automatically switch calls to their destination.

If you look closely at all the original area codes, you wil note the center digit is always either a 0 or a 1 and the final digit is never a 0 or 1. That was a trigger to the equipment this was an area code and not an exchange.

As mentioned above, these days with VoIP, wireless calling and virtual numbers, an area code can be physically located anywhere.

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It think the time where area codes depicted a geographic location is quickly passing.  They were originally invented for DDD (direct distant dialing) so the electromechanical equipment in use in the 60s and 70s could automatically switch calls to their destination. 

If you look closely at all the original area codes, you wil note the center digit is always either a 0 or a 1 and the final digit is never a 0 or 1.  That was a trigger to the equipment this was an area code and not an exchange. 

As mentioned above, these days with VoIP, wireless calling and virtual numbers, an area code can be physically located anywhere.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

True, but area codea will always be associated with some geographic location, regardless of whether or not it is physically attached to it.

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When I was growing up, there were two area codes: 404 for everything above Macon and 912 for everything Macon and below. There was a new area code added to the northern section in the early 90s. Everything outside the metro area gradually changed to 706. After a few years, that was changed as well. The metro area added 770. So, everything ITP was 404. Everything in the metro area OTP was changed to 770. It was also shortly after that time that 678 was added as an area code. A few years ago, S. GA added 229 and 478 in the areas seen on the map. There was a period during the original N. GA switch that allowed local calls to anyone within the 706 area code.

As for georgraphic areas and area codes: Since GA is still owned and operated by the Bellsouth Corp. (part of a coalition with Coca-Cola and Home Depot), the decision is made based on their calling areas.

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I apologize.  440 has been in my head for too long.  Is it 470 instead?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

yes, i heard a year or two ago that atlanta was going to instate another overlay code 470. i haven't seen it pop up yet though.

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The Georgia Public Commission will meet again next week to decide the fate of the 706 area, by the end of next week we should know what our new area code will be. Apparently, the overlay idea seems to be getting a good amount of support so more than likely the overlay will come about.

Some of the previous entries made good valid points, with cell phones the way they are nowadays, most of us are already dialing 10 digits anyway, so no complaints about that. But I do wonder with an area code this big, linking two medium sized cities, who will endup using the new area code first, or who will have the first set of prefixes?

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But I do wonder with an area code this big, linking two medium sized cities, who will endup using the new area code first, or who will have the first set of prefixes?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

As far as I know, as soon as the last exchange in 706 has been assigned, the next local phone company that asks for a new block of numbers (regardless of where they will need to use it) will get one in the new area code. It doesn't matter what city they are in, it just matters on the local demand and availability of numbers.

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Well, here it is. Straight off the GA Public Service Commission Site. The new Overlay area code is....762. Phone subscribers should be notified sometime next month through August. And Permissive 10 digit dialing will begin September 1, and required dialing will begin in April 2006.

More info: Click Here

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Ten-digit dialing is here to stay, and I say it should be the norm nationwide, for consistency, and all of us should get used to dialing longer numbers. It seems silly to travel from place to place and have different ways of dialing phone numbers, within the same country.

I can remember when it was possible to make a "local long distance" call (intra-LATA) that was within the name area code by simply dialing 1-xxx-xxxx. Then the telcos began requiring the area code for any non-local call (most likely to get us used to dialing and remembering area codes in preparation for the upcoming geographic splits post-1994).

Personally I am a big fan of overlay area codes, and in places that have an uneven population distribution, it's sometimes very difficult to find that arbitrary boundary where an old area code could be split and free up enough numbers to justify the split to begin with.

Congratulations on the new code. :)

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I think the area codes 706 and 762 are too close. They could have picked different number that's not so close to the current ones.

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It's not as bad as Florida's area code 954, which has an overlay code of 754. :)

I asked the PSC why such a number would be permitted and the reply I got said that part of what goes into an area code assignment has something to do whether or not is there is an an area code number available that doesn't conflict with the number of an existing exchange. I can't remember the exact details and I've since lost that e-mail.

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