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Inner Loop - CBD, Downtown, East Bank, Germantown, Gulch, Rutledge


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http://www.tennessean.com/story/money/real-estate/2015/06/19/work-start-next-phase-north-gulchs-capitol-view/28908573/

 

Capitol View planning to start by year's end. $90 million six story residential/retail/office building at 11th and Charlotte. $125 million 10 story, 300,000 sq ft office, 20,000 sq ft retail, and 150 room hotel (separate building) at Nelson Merry and 11th.

 

A couple of new renderings are included, as well as more details. It says that with these two buildings (more like blocks) built, Boyle/NW Mutual will still have half of the acreage left to develop.

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Very cool! Can you guys please post pics when it's done? Interesting that the lights can be dimmed. I wonder if that feature is on the At&t tower?

Also, I wonder how long before this is done to the pedestrian bridge? During the 4th of July they cover some of the lights with red and blue film to make it look red, white, and blue. LED lights would work better.

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Thankful May Town Center didn't get built.  I doubt we would be seeing the explosion we have now in the Gulch, North Gulch, and SoBro, or the new construction and the re-use of buildings in the CBD, if MTC had been developed. Or, maybe we would, and it would have been a flop.  Maybe I'm wrong.

 

Perhaps had May Town got built and if it "stuck" like Cool Springs (with incentives), then it very well could have poofed out at least half of any potential explosive construction boom in the CBD.  The fact that the CBD and Midtown are close to each other is a reason that their unprecedented revival has created collateral development in the peripheral areas of North, South, East, and now West.

 

So from the start, I agree that it's a blessing in disguise (or no disguise) that this May Town ended up stillborn.

-==-

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I agree with how cool it is to see all of this empty space within the loop finally getting developed.

 

As I drove up Dickerson Pike yesterday, I was silently lamenting how the interstate slicing through the core of so many neighborhoods just absolutely destroyed these places that undoubtedly were thriving corridors prior to that time.

 

Obviously hindsight is 20/20, but I wonder: Had we known how dramatically the interstate would affect its immediate surroundings, what would have been done differently? The already enormous cost of the entire interstate system being developed at once would have been significantly higher, but it's interesting to think of how different our cityscapes would be had the interstate been built exclusively in elevated fashion in urban areas (akin to the Briley ramp out west near Charlotte). Minimal affect on the street grid, much less displacement of businesses and residents, etc.

 

It's nice to dream about, anyway.

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I agree with how cool it is to see all of this empty space within the loop finally getting developed.

 

As I drove up Dickerson Pike yesterday, I was silently lamenting how the interstate slicing through the core of so many neighborhoods just absolutely destroyed these places that undoubtedly were thriving corridors prior to that time.

 

Obviously hindsight is 20/20, but I wonder: Had we known how dramatically the interstate would affect its immediate surroundings, what would have been done differently? The already enormous cost of the entire interstate system being developed at once would have been significantly higher, but it's interesting to think of how different our cityscapes would be had the interstate been built exclusively in elevated fashion in urban areas (akin to the Briley ramp out west near Charlotte). Minimal affect on the street grid, much less displacement of businesses and residents, etc.

 

It's nice to dream about, anyway.

 

It depends.  I recall in August 1961 riding part of I-40 entering from the east and ending close to old Nashville General Hospital (Rolling Mill), before there ever was a Metro General.  Not much had been sliced up yet, even though the plans all had been formalized.

Even 50+something years later, neighborhood alliances still would have to fight to prevent wholesale condemnation, just as they had to do for 440 as late as the late '70s and early '80s, even though that late still could be pre-dating your "debut".    The 440 Parkway, did however dissect neighborhoods, not only the one(s) who successfully fought to limited extent to contain it on the west side, but it especially sliced up the areas east of Franklin Rd. (US-31), around Berry Hill, Rosedale, Grandview Hts, and Northern Woodbine districts ─ even that late in time.

It seems to have occurred along socio-economic boundaries, not always and not necessarily ethnic or racial.  This happened to the four districts just mentioned, long after it had occurred in North and South; East and West during the '60s and early '70s ─ long enough after the original interstate damage already had been done and long-term effects already had begun to set in, in the districts and in people's minds.  In '61 one could observe what eventually would become the Silliman-Evans bridge, and in a couple of more years, the East would get chopped as we now know it, before I-65 finally had been extended northward past it's then-urban eastside terminus at Spring Street. (early ‘70's).  That's how the once valuable Whites Creek Pk came to no longer remaining a direct path from Dickerson Rd to Brick Church, the Haynes area and on out to the far reaches of what had been originally the US-431 north route.  That's why you have to either thread your way from N. First - Dickerson and via Fern Ave, after I-65 just totally decimated Whites Creek Pk by chopping up that part of that district, or you have to proceed north on Dickerson to Trinity to continue on Brick Church or to Whites Creek.

This in part is why it also happened in the Nations (near Alabama and Delaware Avenues), Melrose, and Wedgwood-Houston during the mid-late '60s when I-65 South had yet to be finished between the Melrose McDonalds and Harding Pl.  And it breaks my heart with what Ellington and Briley Parkways did to the East, Maplewood, and North Inglewood areas.  Even though neighborhoods now may have more provisions than they had in the past, to fend off the seemingly most aggressively divisive destruction of their establishments, those agencies charged with planning still quite often will need some attitude adjustments to combat wanton disregard.  In some manners of speaking, had Nashville not already had an urban-core network of expressways,  I sense that the current mayor could have had (and still could have) the potential of engaging with the state in arbitrarily manipulating an ultimate path of destruction, based on what he would consider "best for the city."  But trends have somewhat been reversed in recent decades, away from creating new such urbanized freeways.

-==-

 

Edited by rookzie
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Google fiber has applied for a zoning variance to install a fiber hut at 2508 Finland St in North Nashville.

I love 3 blocks from it. Is it safe to say that the location of the fiber hut means that the neighborhood will be early in the rollout for fiber service.

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Google fiber has applied for a zoning variance to install a fiber hut at 2508 Finland St in North Nashville.

I love 3 blocks from it. Is it safe to say that the location of the fiber hut means that the neighborhood will be early in the rollout for fiber service.

 

Oh nice... *typed as wearing google fiber t-shirt*

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You mean the amphitheater?  Or is something new going up near Municipal Auditorium or War Memorial?

 

BTW:  Google street views have been updated in most of the CBD and midtown through April '15.  Lots of the stuff currently under construction is shown.

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  • dmillsphoto changed the title to Inner Loop - CBD, Downtown, East Bank, Germantown, Gulch, Rutledge
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