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Kenect Nashville, 20 stories, 420 apts, 24,000 sq.ft. retail, garage, 1815 Division Street


markhollin

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A 20 story, 421 unit residential tower that will include ground floor retail and a garage to be called Kenect Nashville is slated for 1815 Division Street in Midtown.  This is the former site of the Florence Crittenton Home for Unwed Mothers at the T-intersection of Division and 19th Ave. South.  No renderings as of yet.

Chicago-based developer Akara Partners will be in charge of the project.  Going before Metro Planning on Oct 12 with more specifics. 

http://www.nashvillepost.com/business/development/article/20974398/midtown-site-eyed-for-highrise-building

http://www.tennessean.com/story/money/real-estate/2017/09/01/20-story-421-unit-kenect-nashville-apartments-retail-space-planned-midtown-site/625881001/


https://www.bizjournals.com/nashville/news/2017/09/01/chicago-developer-unveils-plans-for-midtown-high.html
 

Screen Shot 2017-09-01 at 2.22.20 PM.png

Here is what Kenect Chicago looks like (just 16 stories):

Screen Shot 2017-09-01 at 3.01.52 PM.png

Screen Shot 2017-09-01 at 3.02.49 PM.png

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Welcome to the forum.

I think the issue is high end multi housing units, which these will be, but I will say a lot of the apartments that have been built recently are being filled at a pretty good rate.

The big need is more affordable units, but there are still a lot on the drawing boards or getting ready to open. Few are affordable, but there are probably 7000 more total, maybe more.

There are around 36 thousand people moving here a year, but they are not all moving to Nashville proper. So we need about that many units coming on line every year and that would include single family homes.

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I would also add that these units won’t be delivered until 2019 at the earliest, and likely 2020. A lot of absorption of the prior round will occur between now and then. With these large products, everything is delivered so far in the future that current market conditions may have little bearing on what the market conditions will be at delivery. That being said, the long term trend is a big need for more housing units everywhere in the metro area. Metro Nashville MSA is currently delivering 18-19,000 residential units a year just to attempt to keep up won th demand. 

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2 hours ago, markhollin said:

A mixed-use building eyed for Midtown could take a step forward later this week when the owners of the site request a zone change to accommodate the project.

According to a Metro document, the mixed-use building would rise on a three-parcel site located at the southeast corner of the T-intersection of Division Street and 19th Avenue South. Cal Turner III (a member of Nashville’s Turner family) owns two parcels, and Salah and Tareq Ayesh own the other.

Chicago-based Akara Partners has created AP 1815 Division Street LLC to undertake the project, which offers a working name of Kenect Nashville. The building, which could stand 20 stories, would include 420 residential units and about 24,000 square feet of ground-level retail space, the document filed with Metro notes.

The owners are seeking specific plan zoning for the parcels and will go before the Metro Planning Commission on Thursday, Oct. 26.

David Earnhart, Akara vice president of design and construction, could not be reached for comment.

It is unclear as to when a detailed rendering will be released. The image seen above shows street orientation and massing.

A zoning overlay in the district would allow for a building of up to 20 stories.

Ankara has not announced its architect if the project materializes. The company worked with Chicago-based Pappageorge Haymes Architects for its Kenect high-rise in Chicago, which was completed in late 2016. Of note, the design firm is also doing work on mixed-used project Fifth + Broadway, now underway in downtown.

Earlier this year, a three-story masonry building once home to the Florence Crittenton Home for Unwed Mothers was demolished on the corner of the site. The brick structure once housed offices of Sound Stage Associates and Warner Bros. Records, and its razing drew concerns from preservationists, as the building was eligible for inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places.

The property sits with Metro Councilmember Freddie O'Connell’s District 19.

The Midtown pocket in which the Ankara building would rise continues to see robust large-scale construction. Within no more than three blocks in any direction stand Adelicia, Aertson Midtown, Kimpton and The Morris (a segment of which is seen on the upper right in the above image). Also, work on mixed-used mid-rise 18th & Chet is fully underway.

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A little more info that explains further.

 

A "Specific Plan District,” generally known as “SP” zoning, refers to a new type of base zoning district, not an overlay, which is not subject to traditional zoning districts’ development standards. Under SP zoning, design standards established for that specific development are written into the zone change ordinance.

Developers who use SP zoning must still follow historic and redevelopment guidelines, subdivision and stormwater regulations, and the goals and objectives of the General Plan.

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19 hours ago, smeagolsfree said:

History & Purpose   In recent years, development professionals in Nashville/Davidson County have called for additional flexibility to create developments that meet market demands, address neighborhood concerns and are suitable to the surroundings.    Meanwhile, Metro Council and its constituents have called for greater certainty that the residential, office, commercial, and industrial developments that are built actually match the plans promised to the community.  The Specific Plan (SP) District creates a new zoning district that gives developers additional flexibility up front and gives Councilmembers and their constituents greater certainty as to the resulting project.

That was from the Metro web site.

I wonder what is they're seeking "additional flexibility" for. Normally it would be to build higher, no?

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I made a card of the proposed development. There is no new information. It all comes from the 'Development Tracker' PDF plan.

38247748176_ff0c42f096_c.jpg

And for what it's worth, I am officially naming the densely developing mid-rise office and residential neighborhood stretching from Vanderbilt to the Music Row roundabout as ......

.......TAYLORTOWN!!

Named after the most famous resident in the neighborhood.

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