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Shipping Containers as Homes


arcturus

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9 minutes ago, GR_Urbanist said:

I could have sworn there was an ArtPrize entry that was a single shipping container structure of some sort.

 

But I also would love to see more places here utilize them, especially as cheap housing options or as a replacement for existing trailer parks

"Containment" was an ArtPrize entry in 2013. It was a Shipping Container that opened up into a Bar.

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1 hour ago, Pattmost20 said:

"Containment" was an ArtPrize entry in 2013. It was a Shipping Container that opened up into a Bar.

I think you can see that bar here. Or something like it -  Bar Lee and Birch

I do think that are some regulations that the city has, I had a friend looking into it but could not get approval for residential.

 

 

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  • 1 year later...

This article today in the Free Press made me think of the discussion in the Wealthy thread a month ago about shipping containers but since that thread has moved on I decided not to post it there.  And I'm not posting it in the Affordable Housing thread because even though the article mentions affordable housing once, this particular container house in Ferndale  isn't what most people think of when they use the term affordable.  So I dug up this old thread from last year to post the article to:

Free Press: shipping-container house sprouts up in Ferndale $450K 

This just re-enforces what I said last month in the Wealthy thread - these aren't at all cheaper than a comparable stick house, so what's the point. 

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22 minutes ago, walker said:

This article today in the Free Press made me think of the discussion in the Wealthy thread a month ago about shipping containers but since that thread has moved on I decided not to post it there.  And I'm not posting it in the Affordable Housing thread because even though the article mentions affordable housing once, this particular container house in Ferndale  isn't what most people think of when they use the term affordable.  So I dug up this old thread from last year to post the article to:

Free Press: shipping-container house sprouts up in Ferndale $450K 

This just re-enforces what I said last month in the Wealthy thread - these aren't at all cheaper than a comparable stick house, so what's the point. 

Not that long ago there was a company claiming total build cost minus land was $130 per Sqft, at that price it completely makes sense. These are priced at $250 per sqft, my guess is they think the value is in the land.

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25 minutes ago, elcelc said:

Down the road from Ferndale is this one in Royal Oak.  Obviously the finishes here are top notch. I'd like to see cost of container vs cost of flatbed full of 2x4s to get a better idea of real value here.

http://thecasaclub.com/royal-oak-shipping-container-house/

A new stick built home with those finishes is probably $200 - $225/sf not including the lot. 

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2 hours ago, jthrasher said:

 that equals less than $100/sf.   New homes are typically way more than that right now.  

Huh? No it's $200-$225/sf for the home. Then add in the lot cost (since lot prices are all over the board). 

So a 2000 sf home with those levels of finishes = $400- 450,000. On a 75000 lot = $475000 - $525,000. 

Granted that shipping container home has way higher finishes than most new homes. 

 

 

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  • 1 month later...
On 3/20/2019 at 4:52 PM, walker said:

This article today in the Free Press made me think of the discussion in the Wealthy thread a month ago about shipping containers but since that thread has moved on I decided not to post it there.  And I'm not posting it in the Affordable Housing thread because even though the article mentions affordable housing once, this particular container house in Ferndale  isn't what most people think of when they use the term affordable.  So I dug up this old thread from last year to post the article to:

Free Press: shipping-container house sprouts up in Ferndale $450K 

This just re-enforces what I said last month in the Wealthy thread - these aren't at all cheaper than a comparable stick house, so what's the point. 

Just an update.  The Free Press today in a follow-up article reports that the Ferndale container house sold for $415K:

Free Press: follow-up shipping container house Ferndale  

Obviously a tolerable but substantial drop from what they were asking.  I kind of suspect a very good profit margin was built into the original list price with the builder pricing it hoping to catch someone who wants to live in a trendy new style house but no one bit at the original price.  The builder probably still did alright at $415K.  

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  • 2 months later...
  • 2 years later...

Many of you here have been intrigued by the idea of living in a shipping container.  Maybe the next evolution of this concept is to live in a Quonset hut (you know - those roundish metal temporary housing units favored by the military around WWII - think of the building where Gomer Pyle lived while serving in the Marines on TV.)  Saturday the Detroit Free Press had a story about a developer from NYC who has moved to Detroit and has bought some distressed property just north of Corktown and is building a community featuring Quonset huts.  The Free Press story is behind a paywall:

FREE PRESS: detroit-core-city-project-buildings-land

So because you likely aren't going to buy a six month subscription just to read this article, I've included some other links that describe this project:

This is from the developer's website - 

http://www.princeconcepts.com/015-the-caterpillar-detroit

This next link is of an article a couple of years old but explains what the guy is trying to do - 

https://seenthemagazine.com/philip-kafka-detroit/

Renting a Quonset hut apartment isn't cheap.  I'm not going to fish my hardcopy of the paper out of the trash but I think the Free Press article said renting one was around $1000 - $1300 a month, so they are not in the price range of the surrounding neighborhood where the average family income in under $30K.   And the developer has been been accused of favoring gentrification after he foreclosed on a popular but inexpensive neighborhood restaurant. 

Unrelated comment on Quonset huts: back sometime I guess after the end of WWII till around 1980 there were several Quonset hut homes scattered along the north side of 44th Street between Clyde Park and Byron Center Rd.  They gradually all disappeared.  They had nothing to do with the National Guard Armory being across the street since the Armory wasn't there till the mid sixties.   Just a guess but I suspect they were war surplus that had been purchased as kits and were put up during the housing shortage just after WWII.   So the Quonset hut experiment was once tried here and they didn't survive. 

 

Detroit Quonset Hut Apartment Building

1687861220_DetroitCoreCityQuonsethutapartmentbuilding.png.b35b9d470c1538be49204fc54242ac47.png        

     photo credit: JC Reindl Detroit Free Press

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On 10/10/2021 at 9:58 AM, walker said:

Many of you here have been intrigued by the idea of living in a shipping container.  Maybe the next evolution of this concept is to live in a Quonset hut (you know - those roundish metal temporary housing units favored by the military around WWII - think of the building where Gomer Pyle lived while serving in the Marines on TV.)  Saturday the Detroit Free Press had a story about a developer from NYC who has moved to Detroit and has bought some distressed property just north of Corktown and is building a community featuring Quonset huts.  The Free Press story is behind a paywall:

FREE PRESS: detroit-core-city-project-buildings-land

So because you likely aren't going to buy a six month subscription just to read this article, I've included some other links that describe this project:

This is from the developer's website - 

http://www.princeconcepts.com/015-the-caterpillar-detroit

This next link is of an article a couple of years old but explains what the guy is trying to do - 

https://seenthemagazine.com/philip-kafka-detroit/

Renting a Quonset hut apartment isn't cheap.  I'm not going to fish my hardcopy of the paper out of the trash but I think the Free Press article said renting one was around $1000 - $1300 a month, so they are not in the price range of the surrounding neighborhood where the average family income in under $30K.   And the developer has been been accused of favoring gentrification after he foreclosed on a popular but inexpensive neighborhood restaurant. 

Unrelated comment on Quonset huts: back sometime I guess after the end of WWII till around 1980 there were several Quonset hut homes scattered along the north side of 44th Street between Clyde Park and Byron Center Rd.  They gradually all disappeared.  They had nothing to do with the National Guard Armory being across the street since the Armory wasn't there till the mid sixties.   Just a guess but I suspect they were war surplus that had been purchased as kits and were put up during the housing shortage just after WWII.   So the Quonset hut experiment was once tried here and they didn't survive. 

 

Detroit Quonset Hut Apartment Building

1687861220_DetroitCoreCityQuonsethutapartmentbuilding.png.b35b9d470c1538be49204fc54242ac47.png        

     photo credit: JC Reindl Detroit Free Press

Quonset huts are cool for a workspace, but not really to live in. They're like A-frame houses, you think there'd be a lot of light but it's only really on the ends. 

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