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spenser1058

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IAR, I'm speaking to you directly now. 

If you haven't read it, one of the most helpful reads my family and I found is a book called The 36-Hour Day: A Family Guide to Caring for People Who Have Alzheimer Disease, Related Dementias, and Memory Loss

https://www.amazon.com/36-Hour-Day-Alzheimer-Disease-Dementias/dp/1455521159/

I would highly recommend reading it if you haven't done so already.  I bought copies for about a dozen members of the family.  I turned visit days at the care facility into book club-like conversations whether they wanted to talk about it or not because some of the passages are quite difficult for a family member who is in denial or thinks their loved one will get better soon from this awful disease.  It can be digested in very small bites which is helpful for people who are a bit on the emotional side.

Another family member preferred the book Creating Moments of Joy Along the Alzheimer's Journey: A Guide for Families and Caregivers but I didn't find it as helpful.  Maybe you will or maybe you have already read both of these.  Either way, take it as a friendly note.

https://www.amazon.com/Creating-Moments-Along-Alzheimers-Journey/dp/1557537607/

 

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2 hours ago, HankStrong said:

IAR, I'm speaking to you directly now. 

If you haven't read it, one of the most helpful reads my family and I found is a book called The 36-Hour Day: A Family Guide to Caring for People Who Have Alzheimer Disease, Related Dementias, and Memory Loss

https://www.amazon.com/36-Hour-Day-Alzheimer-Disease-Dementias/dp/1455521159/

I would highly recommend reading it if you haven't done so already.  I bought copies for about a dozen members of the family.  I turned visit days at the care facility into book club-like conversations whether they wanted to talk about it or not because some of the passages are quite difficult for a family member who is in denial or thinks their loved one will get better soon from this awful disease.  It can be digested in very small bites which is helpful for people who are a bit on the emotional side.

Another family member preferred the book Creating Moments of Joy Along the Alzheimer's Journey: A Guide for Families and Caregivers but I didn't find it as helpful.  Maybe you will or maybe you have already read both of these.  Either way, take it as a friendly note.

https://www.amazon.com/Creating-Moments-Along-Alzheimers-Journey/dp/1557537607/

 

Thank you Hank and DcLuley.  I can easily accept your version of what happened.  I hope you can see things from my point-of-view however:  I have been consistently criticized for many of my posts.  I had no reason to think this would be any different.

I also admit I am very sensitive on the issue of my father.

Having said that, I will apologize for any misunderstanding.  We may never be friends, but I understand you are NOT had people. 

And to Hank, thanks for the note.  My condolences to your own family member who had Alzheimer's.  It's a painful thing for patients AND family members to go through.

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I viewed your post and also accept the apology.  It was simply a misunderstanding.  Thank you for the condolences, also.  You've got a tough road ahead and I don't have anything but sympathy for that aspect of your life.  It won't get an easier.

 

 

Just FYI, I will still be ignoring your posts as I still believe you are often just trying to antagonize people (outside of the subject of your father's health and your disabled child which I don't believe you are) on this board in regards to on-topic posts, so please assume in the future that anything I say in any thread has NOTHING to do with you, unless I directly mention you.  I will be respectful of you and to you, by not partaking in your conversations.  I do not wish to have anything I say/do be reported as an attack on you, so know that my conversations on this board are not directed at you.  I will, no doubt, participate in threads where you are participating, but my interactions are not with you.  I have no further protests with you and will simply ignore attempts to engage.

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2 hours ago, HankStrong said:

I viewed your post and also accept the apology.  It was simply a misunderstanding.  Thank you for the condolences, also.  You've got a tough road ahead and I don't have anything but sympathy for that aspect of your life.  It won't get an easier.

 

 

Just FYI, I will still be ignoring your posts as I still believe you are often just trying to antagonize people (outside of the subject of your father's health and your disabled child which I don't believe you are) on this board in regards to on-topic posts, so please assume in the future that anything I say in any thread has NOTHING to do with you, unless I directly mention you.  I will be respectful of you and to you, by not partaking in your conversations.  I do not wish to have anything I say/do be reported as an attack on you, so know that my conversations on this board are not directed at you.  I will, no doubt, participate in threads where you are participating, but my interactions are not with you.  I have no further protests with you and will simply ignore attempts to engage.

Fair enough.  

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Again, sort of wonkish (as the Times often is), but I really liked David Brooks' piece on Localism as the next big idea. I confess the dysfunction in DC and Tallahassee has left me dispirited but here in Orlando there's been a sense of progress. Of course, depending on your point of view that might be be very different in Eola Heights than in Clermont, but that's a feature not a bug, I think.

James Fallows and Tom Friedman are also writing about this and noting how cities that have been all but forgotten in the last couple of decades are coming back thanks to efforts close to home.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/19/opinion/national-politics-localism-populism.html?action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=opinion-c-col-left-region&region=opinion-c-col-left-region&WT.nav=opinion-c-col-left-region

From the New York Times

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All I can tell you is my personal experience.

We lived in a house that was about 950 feet away from the wall of a very busy highway according to Google Maps  and their measure tool.  That article says the approx. sweet spot is <300' away.  It says that anything beyond that gets amplified.  Our house was about 10'-15' higher elevation than the highway, so we weren't in a valley.  Our front door faced the highway and our bedroom was in the furthest room to the rear of the house.  We did have woods behind the house, so that seems like it would trap the sound and bounce some of it back to our house, where we'd get the noise from both the front and back.

We lived there both before and after the wall was built.  We also lived in the first house built in the neighborhood beyond the models.  Before other homes went in and before the wall, the highway noise was like it was in the bedroom with us.  The rest of the neighborhood went in prior to the wall being built.  That cut about 25% of the noise out right away.  I'm sure it didn't for the people directly next to the highway, but it did for us.

After they built the wall (and boy did that take forever) our highway noise vanished.  Before we moved you could still hear the sirens and if a semi used its Jake brakes, but general highway noise wasn't being ignored, it just wasn't there. 

 

My feelings and personal experience doesn't jive with that article.  I don't live near a highway now, but if I looked at a home near one I'd never buy without a wall.

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^^

on the subject of Alzheimer's, stay clear of cholesterol medication, b/c it has statins in it and that accelerates brain cell degeneration.

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3 hours ago, jrs2 said:

^^

on the subject of Alzheimer's, stay clear of cholesterol medication, b/c it has statins in it and that accelerates brain cell degeneration.

My dad got it and it took him fast.

Edited by JFW657
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Disney Land announced this morning it will increase its minimum wage to $15/hour by January.  Some workers will get up to a 20% wage increase. 

The minimum wage will increase to $15.45 by mid-2020.  The wage increases will apply to 10k members of Disney Land's largest union. 

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Statins are poison.

Disease looking for a reason to cure you from something that is not your real problem.  

Your cholesterol is fine - eat more avocados and eggs. 

Walk. 

Edited by dcluley98

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This week, Joy Wallace Dickinson looks at the Dr. Phillips house that's jammed in between the East-West Expressway and the Orange Ave. exit ramp (yes, someone should have been run out of town for that travesty, but I digress):

http://www.orlandosentinel.com/features/os-joy-wallace-dickinson-0729-story.html

From the Sentinel

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As a coda to memories of great nights downtown in the late '80's and early '90's at Lincoln's Church St Market, here's news that retailer Brookstone is declaring bankruptcy again and closing all its mall stores. It will focus on its remaining airport stores and website.

Brookstone and its fellow gadget emporium Sharper Image across the street were the highlight of dinner at the Olive Garden sprawling across Church St, nickel beer at Rosie's and chilling in the massage chair at SI or paying waaaay too much for a silver-plated wrench set at Brookstone. 

Cue it, Barbra!

Like buttah.

 

https://money.cnn.com/2018/08/02/news/companies/brookstone-bankruptcy/index.html

From CNN and YouTube

Edited by spenser1058

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I remember Brookstone had those huge battery operated, deep-tissue throbbing back massagers that were the size of a sawed off baseball bat, and which you could go in and try out. Don't think I ever purchased anything from them, though I did buy one or two gadgets from Sharper Image.

It was fun going in and browsing around in those places. Seems like just yesterday.

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I have often remarked how one-sided the discussion on this site can be.  I have even called it mindless cheerleading.

I have done a little research to see what area residents really think.  The results mostly confirm what I have heard from people who I know and who I speak to.

Best Places includes 225 comments about metro Orlando. The city earned an average 2 stars out of 5.  Common complaints include the people, job quality, and traffic.  I personally don't find Orlandoans rude, but many others seem to. (I would say Orlandoans are indifferent, but that is far from saying they are horrible people).  The comments also suggest that many residents  are not enamored with the tourism industry and do not like that Orlando's entire identity is wrapped up in tourism.

Another website is City Data, a message board for people asking questions (like what it's like to live here).  The comments are pretty even-handed.  There are many positIve things said about the area.  People are not afraid to call Orlando out for its shortcomings however.  Even the negative comments are fair.  

People on both sites frequently applaud Orlando's diversity, job growth and entertainment options.  I think we can all agree those are big strengths.  Those are not minor considerations.

I urge people to consider the comments on these sites.  They represent real public perception of residents.  Nothing will ever improve unless the shortcomings are acknowledged.  That is, after all, what we are want.  Isn't it?

https://www.bestplaces.net/city/florida/orlando

http://www.city-data.com/forum/orlando/

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3 hours ago, I am Reality said:

I have often remarked how one-sided the discussion on this site can be.  I have even called it mindless cheerleading.

I have done a little research to see what area residents really think.  The results mostly confirm what I have heard from people who I know and who I speak to.

Best Places includes 225 comments about metro Orlando. The city earned an average 2 stars out of 5.  Common complaints include the people, job quality, and traffic.  I personally don't find Orlandoans rude, but many others seem to. (I would say Orlandoans are indifferent, but that is far from saying they are horrible people).  The comments also suggest that many residents  are not enamored with the tourism industry and do not like that Orlando's entire identity is wrapped up in tourism.

Another website is City Data, a message board for people asking questions (like what it's like to live here).  The comments are pretty even-handed.  There are many positIve things said about the area.  People are not afraid to call Orlando out for its shortcomings however.  Even the negative comments are fair.  

People on both sites frequently applaud Orlando's diversity, job growth and entertainment options.  I think we can all agree those are big strengths.  Those are not minor considerations.

I urge people to consider the comments on these sites.  They represent real public perception of residents.  Nothing will ever improve unless the shortcomings are acknowledged.  That is, after all, what we are want.  Isn't it?

https://www.bestplaces.net/city/florida/orlando

http://www.city-data.com/forum/orlando/

Nashville, New Orleans, LA and San Fran scored a 1.

Austin, Phoenix, Dallas, Atlanta, Tampa, Philly, Charlotte all scored a 2.

I didn't bother to look at any other cities, but it seems to me the forum attracts people that dislike pretty much everywhere.

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4 hours ago, I am Reality said:

I have often remarked how one-sided the discussion on this site can be.  I have even called it mindless cheerleading.

I have done a little research to see what area residents really think.  The results mostly confirm what I have heard from people who I know and who I speak to.

Best Places includes 225 comments about metro Orlando. The city earned an average 2 stars out of 5.  Common complaints include the people, job quality, and traffic.  I personally don't find Orlandoans rude, but many others seem to. (I would say Orlandoans are indifferent, but that is far from saying they are horrible people).  The comments also suggest that many residents  are not enamored with the tourism industry and do not like that Orlando's entire identity is wrapped up in tourism.

Another website is City Data, a message board for people asking questions (like what it's like to live here).  The comments are pretty even-handed.  There are many positIve things said about the area.  People are not afraid to call Orlando out for its shortcomings however.  Even the negative comments are fair.  

People on both sites frequently applaud Orlando's diversity, job growth and entertainment options.  I think we can all agree those are big strengths.  Those are not minor considerations.

I urge people to consider the comments on these sites.  They represent real public perception of residents.  Nothing will ever improve unless the shortcomings are acknowledged.  That is, after all, what we are want.  Isn't it?

https://www.bestplaces.net/city/florida/orlando

http://www.city-data.com/forum/orlando/

Hi. I’ve been a UP lurker for several years but decided to create an account to refute this claim. I mean absolutely no ill will at all, but these ratings are not concrete. Reason being is a tiny sample size. Most of these cities have over 150 reviews, but only the most recent ones seem to be counted. Looking at the reviews, the ones from before 2017 don’t appear to be included in the city’s rating, as the number of stars in that particular review is grayed out. But the reviews after 2017 have blue stars, indicating these reviews contributed to the city’s rating.

Also, most cities that I looked up have 1 or 2 stars, including recently trendy and revered cities like Denver, Asheville NC, Charleston SC, Austin, Pittsburgh, Raleigh, Charlotte, St. Petersburg, San Diego, Tampa, San Francisco, and many many more. On the other hand, cities such as St. Louis, Miami and Detroit have 4 or 5 stars, which I truly don’t think most people share that opinion.

Orlando definitely has its problems, but I think using bestplaces.net’s limited sample size of reviews doesn’t accurately depict how most people view the City Beautiful.

Edited by Uncommon
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I would agree the Best Places rankings (the 2 stars) count for little (if anything).  As I said, the commenters seemed waaaay too harsh on the people in Orlando.  I have NEVER - in 35 years living here off and on - experienced rude people.  I have certainly never experienced "sociopathic" people.  That is just crazy talk.  I see the people here as a huge advantage.  

I still see many valuable posts on it though (people-bashing, aside). 

Also, I noticed quite a few very postive commenters who didn't give Orlando any stars.  That is clearly a mistake that likely skewed the ranking.

I had not seen the Best Places ratings for the other cities mentioned.  That is kind of funny.  It renders the whole ranking system worthless.  

I think that the City Data comments are pretty spot-on.  They are mostly positive with a fair-share of healthy criticism.  

I value a debate on these issues.  It really bothers me that some people (not nearly all) have lost perspective or objectively.  I see posting anonymous cheerleading as no different than anonymous criticizing.  

(P.S I also welcome Uncommon.  I am glad you started posting.)

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11 minutes ago, I am Reality said:

I would agree the Best Places rankings (the 2 stars) count for little (if anything).  As I said, the commenters seemed waaaay too harsh on the people in Orlando.  I have NEVER - in 35 years living here off and on - experienced rude people.  I have certainly never experienced "sociopathic" people.  That is just crazy talk.  I see the people here as a huge advantage.  

I still see many valuable posts on it though (people-bashing, aside). 

Also, I noticed quite a few very postive commenters who didn't give Orlando any stars.  That is clearly a mistake that likely skewed the ranking.

I had not seen the Best Places ratings for the other cities mentioned.  That is kind of funny.  It renders the whole ranking system worthless.  

I think that the City Data comments are pretty spot-on.  They are mostly positive with a fair-share of healthy criticism.  

I value a debate on these issues.  It really bothers me that some people (not nearly all) have lost perspective or objectively.  I see posting anonymous cheerleading as no different than anonymous criticizing.  

(P.S I also welcome Uncommon.  I am glad you started posting.)

Thanks for the welcome and kind words.

I think the issue is Bestplaces.net must have recently updated their ratings. I don’t think the site allows users to post reviews without giving stars. What it looks like happened is that the reviews from before 2017 DID in fact have stars, but with the site updating, it removed all of the ratings but left the comments. That’s why if you look at a city like Gary, Indiana, it doesn’t have a rating but it has 7 reviews. The reviews themselves were left, but the star ratings were removed in the update because they were prior to 2017. Miami, as another example, derives its 4 star rating from a single review, which happened post-2017. Bottom line, Bestplaces.net’s reviews are highly flawed and skewed at the moment.

But yes, I totally agree about City-data. The users on that site are much more level-headed and far less racist/xenophobic. I think that site depicts a more accurate representation of Orlando’s perception. I love Orlando but by no means am a cheerleader. I echo the thoughts of a lot of people who find Orlando a traffic nightmare, slightly cookie-cutter, oppressively hot, comparatively low-paying, and way too sprawling. Outside of a very short list of places, I wouldn’t consider living anywhere else though.

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