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CATS Long Term Transit Plan - Silver, Red, Airport Lines

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^Don't UPers have enough problems with overhead wires? ;)

On a serious note, any type of public transport with a DEDICATED RIGHT OF WAY (rail, bus rapid transit, gondola) is fine with me...

Edited by ChessieCat

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Gondolas are the new monorails. Unless you have a topographical situation (like Portland's) then its not a practical solution worth serious consideration.

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Kinda random question, but since the Gold Line goes on Trade St, does that mean that there will be overhead wires going through The Square with the extension? Personally, I think it would definitely ruin The Square.

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3 minutes ago, bluehedgehogNS said:

Kinda random question, but since the Gold Line goes on Trade St, does that mean that there will be overhead wires going through The Square with the extension? Personally, I think it would definitely ruin The Square.

Nope, they are spending extra to purchase vehicles with batteries that will allow them to pass through the square without wires.

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I lived in Soflo before moving here which is the land of underground wires and I don’t have any problem with overhead wires, Yes sometimes they are an eye sore but it gives streets a character sometimes. Just my opinion please don’t everyone attack me at once.

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11 hours ago, DCMetroRaleigh said:

Although it is far from reality, there is a proposal to have a gondola transport people over the Potomac between Georgetown and Rosslyn-Arlington.

River gondolas are actually pretty appealing, in my opinion. Even New York has one next to the Queensboro Bridge over Roosevelt Island. Gondolas look significantly less attractive when there is no river or mountain involved.

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On ‎5‎/‎15‎/‎2018 at 11:53 AM, ChessieCat said:

^Don't UPers have enough problems with overhead wires? ;)

On a serious note, any type of public transport with a FIXED RIGHT OF WAY (rail, bus rapid transit, gondola) is fine with me...

I've probably said this before, but if you hate overhead wires, don't go to Toronto.

Edited by Dale

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55 minutes ago, kermit said:

More than one speaker today mentioned that the new transit plan will include running the airport line into Gaston (but none of them were CATS planners). (Same for Cabarrus, and they included discussion of building out the Phillip Morris site for TOD)

Conversely, more than one speaker from York county mentioned that their density is “just not there yet” for rail transit. 

Thanks for the summary!

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I talked with a family member highly placed in local government about expanding our rail lines (won't say which community for their sake), and they seemed rather pessimistic about a big bang or even a silver line without major federal funds that they are pessimistic will happen anytime within the next decade.

They (and many leaders around here) are a firm believer in rail and fully support it, but fear we are closer to ending up like Nashville than Denver without a major change in Raleigh or DC in regards to funding priorities. 

I'm not trying to rain on anyone's parade, just relaying their view from the 'inside'.

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The NC legislature will change ... from this Republican to that Republican.

But I wouldn't rule out the possibility of them softening a bit on rail transit.

 

 

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On 5/26/2018 at 1:48 PM, Dale said:

The NC legislature will change ... from this Republican to that Republican.

But I wouldn't rule out the possibility of them softening a bit on rail transit.

 

 

In the scheme of the next couple elections, i can NC rapidly liberalizing, similar to Virginia in the mid 2000s. So much urban growth, coupled with judicial challenges on current GOP drawn districts leads me to believe there will be significant changes in NC state politics. 

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1 hour ago, CarolinaDaydreamin said:

In the scheme of the next couple elections, i can NC rapidly liberalizing, similar to Virginia in the mid 2000s. So much urban growth, coupled with judicial challenges on current GOP drawn districts leads me to believe there will be significant changes in NC state politics. 

Maybe, but they've been saying this about Texas for years and years. Heck, Florida too. And both those states have been adding rail.

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32 minutes ago, Dale said:

Maybe, but they've been saying this about Texas for years and years. Heck, Florida too. And both those states have been adding rail.

We don’t necessarily need to be blue, just more competitive to see change. There should be consequences to pissing off CLT, GSO, RDU, W-S and AVL instead of mocking us “they’re using water baloons when we (legislators) have bazookas” 

 

It was like living in the twilight zone when patty was governor. It was a daily hammer up side the head going out of their way to bash the cities, taking away CLT’s airport, AVL’s water, GSO’s local election jurisdiction maps, RDU’s housing codes. And there was a very trumpian (and this was even pre-Trump) “Don’t challenge us or you will be punished. Just bend over and take it” (like when they threatened to strip funding for the blue line if we started the gold line.)

 

since cooper has been governor, we have had zero drama from Berger, Tim Moore or from anyone for that matter. So just a little more blue representation will do all sorts of good to balance out things in NC

Edited by AirNostrumMAD
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20 minutes ago, AirNostrumMAD said:

We don’t necessarily need to be blue, just more competitive to see change. There should be consequences to pissing off CLT, GSO, RDU, W-S and AVL instead of mocking us “they’re using water baloons when we (legislators) have bazookas” 

 

It was like living in the twilight zone when patty was governor. It was a daily hammer up side the head going out of their way to bash the cities, taking away CLT’s airport, AVL’s water, GSO’s local election jurisdiction maps, RDU’s housing codes. And there was a very trumpian (and this was even pre-Trump) “Don’t challenge us or you will be punished. Just bend over and take it” (like when they threatened to strip funding for the blue line if we started the gold line.)

 

since cooper has been governor, we have had zero drama from Berger, Tim Moore or from anyone for that matter. So just a little more blue representation will do all sorts of good to balance out things in NC

Arguably, Berger and Moore have been more apt to compromise than has Cooper.

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14 minutes ago, Dale said:

Arguably, Berger and Moore have been more apt to compromise than has Cooper.

 

Which was  my point. There will be more compromise when there is a little more balance. I don’t really care who scores political points for compromise so long as state legislators get out of the way. 

They treated McCrory like a cuck.

Edited by AirNostrumMAD

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7 hours ago, Dale said:

Maybe, but they've been saying this about Texas for years and years. Heck, Florida too. And both those states have been adding rail.

Its a nitpick but I would say that the state governments of Florida and Texas have done very little to encourage rail development. The only activity in Florida has been Brightline which is a 100% private industry effort to develop inter-city rail on an existing freight line, while the state has not blocked those efforts they have done very little to help (including contributing zero dollars).

Texas is similar, a private company (Texas Central) has proposed to develop what may be a privately funded new ROW intercity service between suburban Houston and downtown Dallas. The state government has yet to decide if they will allow Texas Central to use the eminent domain powers that railroads have traditionally been given. If they decide against treating Texas Central like every other railroad then they will truly be obstructionist towards rail. Lots of other state legislation has been brought against Texas Central as well: https://www.texastribune.org/2017/02/23/come-and-take-it-eminent-domain-dispute-heart-train-battles/

The right really likes to vilify transit, and Texas Central's troubles suggest that their putative "pro-business" footing does not apply equally to rail.

 

Edited by kermit
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2 hours ago, kermit said:

Its a nitpick but I would say that the state governments of Florida and Texas have done very little to encourage rail development. The only activity in Florida has been Brightline which is a 100% private industry effort to develop inter-city rail on an existing freight line, while the state has not blocked those efforts they have done very little to help (including contributing zero dollars).

Texas is similar, a private company (Texas Central) has proposed to develop what may be a privately funded new ROW intercity service between suburban Houston and downtown Dallas. The state government has yet to decide if they will allow Texas Central to use the eminent domain powers that railroads have traditionally been given. If they decide against treating Texas Central like every other railroad then they will truly be obstructionist towards rail. Lots of other state legislation has been brought against Texas Central as well: https://www.texastribune.org/2017/02/23/come-and-take-it-eminent-domain-dispute-heart-train-battles/

The right really likes to vilify transit, and Texas Central's troubles suggest that their putative "pro-business" footing does not apply equally to rail.

 

And I'm all about private enterprise.

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