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Paramount Tower, 65-68 stories, approx. 750', 200 units, $240 million, Church Street Park


markhollin

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  • 3 weeks later...
16 minutes ago, PillowTalk4 said:

Maybe since I no longer live in Nashville, I don't understand the rationale for not at least working with Tony on this deal.  Downtown will still have a park.  The city gets additional public housing with specific allocations for homeless teens, veterans and others paid for by private monies in a land swap.  The city also gets a 60+ story residential tower that will bring in more property tax revenue.  Something a park alone cannot do.

Tell me why this doesn't make sense for Metro.  Has there been an alternative proposal that would offer the same or more?  I remember the Hermitage being against the project.  Is their influence that great?  Is their proposal to revamp the existing park really that much better?  What are they doing for homelessness in the area?  Do they offer meals to the homeless people in and around the area?  Do they provide shelter to the homeless on cold winter nights?  I'm not asking out of sarcasm or even my strong desire to see a 60 story building built in Nashville.  I just don't see from the outside attempting to look in, what the issue is with Tony's proposal, and I'd like to understand why the Hermitage is so against it.  And, why Metro isn't responding to it?

The Hermitage proposal to revamp the park has led to it being closed for months and some new grass/planters being put out. 
 

They likely don’t want to deal with the construction for a few years, and the impact on their business. 
 

This isn’t a bad deal by any means, but the optics of “giving away” park land to a developer has led to people who don’t have to deal with the state of the park to be against redevelopment. 

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So, even if the deal includes creating a better park around the corner, people refuse to see the benefit of Tony's proposal to the city versus just rehabbing a park that will more than likely have the same issues?

Also, if the Hermitage is concerned about the construction around them for a few years, that's being very short sighted.  I think I've said this before, having a 60+ story residential building next to a hotel would seem to me to be an opportunity for more business.  The hotel can establish a concierge program with the residential building, offering catering services for parties, and meal delivery services.  Additionally, they can even offer laundry and dry cleaning services.  Not to mention that one can expect that residents of said tower will also choose to take in a cocktail from the bars and meals from the restaurants.  I would also suspect that the Hermitage could work out a specific rate structure for guest for those visiting residents in the residential building if that becomes necessary.

Let me also add, that I've stayed in hotels in NYC that were surrounded by construction sites.  Not only does NYC do a great job in ensuring the safety of the guests and staff at the hotel with proper protective coverings and  scaffolding at street level, you now see developers working with affected properties to ensure proper signage is present and entrances and exists are clear and easy to access.  I've even seen where the scaffolding is draped with weather resistant fabrics that are colorful, create canopy type coverings and even lighting to make the area appear welcoming even with the construction nearby.  One would think Tony would work with the Hermitage to mitigate disruptions to the hotel.  It would be in his best interest to do so. 

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I have heard most of the opposition is coming from several of the developers downtown, such as the executives of Boyle, who developed the Capitol View development. Jeff Haynes is from a powerful political family and he is on record as saying he doesn't think it's fair for Metro to exchange land with a developer.  His family has big time pull on Metro Council. 

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2 minutes ago, MLBrumby said:

I have heard most of the opposition is coming from several of the developers downtown, such as the executives of Boyle, who developed the Capitol View development. Jeff Haynes is from a powerful political family and he is on record as saying he doesn't think it's fair for Metro to exchange land with a developer.  His family has big time pull on Metro Council. 

The best thing to do is just metro to sell the land publicly. 

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3 hours ago, nashvylle said:

The best thing to do is just metro to sell the land publicly. 

I believe that was proffered by Haynes (or some other DT developer... I forget) back when TG first proposed Paramount with the homeless apartment building near Parkway Towers and the Justice Center. 

Boyle used its power with the state to fast-track upgrades at the Goose Creek/Peytonsville exit off I-65 for its Berry Farms development. 

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What’s ironic is that the Nashville post said in an article a day or so ago that the Hermitage is about to undergo some renovations. While they are minuscule compared to a new 750’ tower being constructed, it is quite amusing to hear them complain about construction just to later announce some of their own…

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 2/4/2021 at 8:32 PM, UrbanWes03 said:

What’s ironic is that the Nashville post said in an article a day or so ago that the Hermitage is about to undergo some renovations. While they are minuscule compared to a new 750’ tower being constructed, it is quite amusing to hear them complain about construction just to later announce some of their own…

They're struggling and everything around them makes them nervous. They can't keep up with the hot hotels. People coming (or when they come back) to Nashville want to stay at the trendy Dreams and Noelles of the world.  Hermitage appeals to certain people, but the throwback five star isn't what most people seek out anymore.

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12 hours ago, DDIG said:

Hermitage appeals to certain people, but the throwback five star isn't what most people seek out anymore.

Yes, you're probably right. It's an outstanding, iconic  property - with a LOT of Nashville history woven into its 110 year fabric.  It's a jewel in the city's crown, and despite their resistance to change or any other fault they may have,  I surely don't want to lose them. Hope they figure it out.... And I guess if they don't, an asset team will eventually buy them.

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I stayed a few times at the Copley Plaza historic hotel in Boston. Rooms were big but bathrooms were tiny. And hallway noise traveled too easily into the rooms through the transom over doors. This was back in 1998 and I certainly hope the property has been renovated to remedy those issues. But it’s typical of very old hotels that wow people with their old world lobbies and bars and old style penthouse apartments but not the best for sleeping. I also stayed at Gramercy Park Hotel pre-renovation. Place was filthy and very creepy vibe. The elevators were tiny too. Haven’t been back since their reno but I’ve heard it’s stunning. 

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23 minutes ago, Flatrock said:

Yes, you're probably right. It's an outstanding, iconic  property - with a LOT of Nashville history woven into its 110 year fabric.  It's a jewel in the city's crown, and despite their resistance to change or any other fault they may have,  I surely don't want to lose them. Hope they figure it out.... And I guess if they don't, an asset team will eventually buy them.

Don't get me wrong. I agree with all you say about the Hermitage and wish them to thrive. I just don't like them stonewalling the Church street site redevelopment in fear.

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1 hour ago, MLBrumby said:

I stayed a few times at the Copley Plaza historic hotel in Boston. Rooms were big but bathrooms were tiny. And hallway noise traveled too easily into the rooms through the transom over doors. This was back in 1998 and I certainly hope the property has been renovated to remedy those issues. But it’s typical of very old hotels that wow people with their old world lobbies and bars and old style penthouse apartments but not the best for sleeping. I also stayed at Gramercy Park Hotel pre-renovation. Place was filthy and very creepy vibe. The elevators were tiny too. Haven’t been back since their reno but I’ve heard it’s stunning. 

I've stayed at both the Gramercy and the Plaza Hotel…and both were so underwhelming.  You definitely aren’t paying for the “room” experience. 

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  • 3 months later...
37 minutes ago, smeagolsfree said:

Well lets see how long they can keep that ambitious schedule up. They cannot keep the homeless out of the park as these events are open to the public, so if people do not feel safe  around some of the homeless or if there is one problem, the the manager of the Hermitage Hotel will be blamed because I guarantee its her brainfart, I mean Brainchild.

How many kids are living in the condos downtown to have Kids’ Art in the Park! or when it gets hot who wants to do a Creative Writing Workshops in the heat or Monday Meditation in the heat of the day on busy Church street. Come on some one has their head where the sun does not shine and I don't mean under a shade tree. A lot of these events are best suited in the library where they need to be.

I wish them the best, but only see failure in the Magic 8 Ball.

Yeah, it is going to take more than programming. They'll have to actively remove homeless which I don't see them doing for the long run and then it will be a return to status quo. 

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