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Frankie811

Hartford vs Providence?

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Now that the Connecticut Convention Center in downtown Hartford (Adrian's Landing ) is about to open it is very clear that they intend to compete with the Rhode Island Convention Center for business. Their facility is larger than ours is and is probably more modern and up-to-date. Hartford is also adding many new upscale housing units so we could be competing with them as well on that front for high income people living in eastern and southeastern CT. But where would you want to hold your next convention. Just stiring the pot :whistling:

http://www.courant.com/news/local/hc-conve...dlines-breaking

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Hartford can eat me ;)

jk

I have never been to hartford so I have no idea... but as far as the upscale housing being built there.. how far is hartford from Prov and Boston and NYC??? NYC, not so far, but our housing will most likely stand out just because of the proximity to the Prov. train station (2 steps and a hop) and to boston ( a short train ride :P )

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I went to school at the University of Hartford, which is actually located in West Hartford (kind of like the East Side to our Downtown). There was very little culture in the actual city after five in Hartford's downtown core. Its gotten a little better in recent years, but it is still a ghost town after the business people leave. During the day, i can see the competition, but at night, Hartford just doesn't have the culture and nightlife yet. There are a handful of places, but for a downtown core that is larger than Providence's, its a pathetic few. Maybe their plan is that convention traffic will bring more culture in, but for now, i think we have them beat on that front.

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But where would you want to hold your next convention.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Not even being a homer, the answer is Providence. Hartford has a lot of work to do to be able to compete with Providence culturally, and even just with our proximity to places like Newport, Boston, and the Cape. Providence better watch it's back though. There's not doubt that the eagerness to get projects done on the city/states part like the expansion at the Westin is at least partially a result of expected competition from Hartford.

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Providence better watch it's back though. There's not doubt that the eagerness to get projects done on the city/states part like the expansion at the Westin is at least partially a result of expected competition from Hartford.

Good for all involved.

Hartford is (if I'm correct) the poorest mid-size city in the United States. That being said, Providence also used to be a hole. If a little competition gets both cities moving then it should work wonders for the local economy and perhaps soften the blow the region will take from Boston's losses.

I'm hoping that our success carries over east to Fall River and that Hartford's carries north to Springfield, it's a way down the road but I'd like to see the cities of New England start to come together a little more (better transit infrastructure, perhaps?). I think that the only way we're going to compete with other parts of the country/world economically is if we pool together the strengths of all our cities and exploit their proximity to one another. We're essentially one very large metropolis spread out and functioning as several smaller ones. I'm not saying homogenize New England but at least play for the same team.

Hartford is bold in it's convention center tactic because the tactic itself is being played out, everyones' grandmother has a new convention center, let's face it. And just like in real life, size matters, but the convention center alone doesn't do it. Providence's convention center isn't far off in size and has (and will have) a considerably larger number of hotel rooms immediately surrounding it's center whereas Hartford's is in a corner bordered by two highways and a river which creates physical barriers around it. I admire Hartford's initiative and I believe it will pay off in the long run but it'll take a lot more to bring Hartford to where it wants to be. Hartford isn't a destination, it's a working city. They need to focus on getting residents into their downtown, this will cultivate the restaurant and nightlife growth that they need to start to become more of a destination. When these changes occur, the convention center will pay off.

Then again, everything I just wrote could be wrong.

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Hartford is bold in it's convention center tactic because the tactic itself is being played out, everyones' grandmother has a new convention center, let's face it. And just like in real life, size matters, but the convention center alone doesn't do it. Providence's convention center isn't far off in size and has (and will have) a considerably larger number of hotel rooms immediately surrounding it's center whereas Hartford's is in a corner bordered by two highways and a river which creates physical barriers around it.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Out of curiosity, if the Dunk is merged into the existing RI convention center, would the combination be bigger than Hartford's new center?

I agree about this tactic having played itself out... Can anyone think of even one city where a convention center has "turned things around" all by itself? Hasn't Hartford been down the "this project will save us" road before with Constitution Plaza and the Civic Center? Same for New Haven with its Civic Center and Chapel Square Mall? What's turning New Haven around now is relatively affordable housing, residential development downtown, and retail/restaurant development downtown. Same mix for White Plains, NY.

- Garris

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Hartford and Woocester both made the same, peculiar error: they are not connected to Providence. Woocester has recently improved the 146 connection, but it still evaporates as you approcah the city. Clearly, they see 146 as a back door rather than a real artery.

It is all but impossible to go from Prov to Hartford. Why? It's not far but will take almost 2 hours from lack of highway access.

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Hartford and Woocester both made the same, peculiar error: they are not connected to Providence. Woocester has recently improved the 146 connection, but it still evaporates as you approcah the city. Clearly, they see 146 as a back door rather than a real artery.

It is all but impossible to go from Prov to Hartford. Why? It's not far but will take almost 2 hours from lack of highway access.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

In the 70's there was talk of extending Rt 84 in CT to Providence, but it didn't happen because it would have meant more exhuast which was seen as a threat to the Scitute Reservoir where we get our water from.

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In the 70's there was talk of extending Rt 84 in CT to Providence, but it didn't happen because it would have meant more exhuast which was seen as a threat to the Scitute Reservoir where we get our water from.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

You can see this at the end of Route 6 in Johnston- the pavement goes on beyond the exit rampt to 295 (just like 295 in Attleboro and 138 in North Kingstown). In Connecticutt, I-384 was supposed to connect to Providence and be the route for I-84 but instead, 384 just goes out eastward and then just ends.

Unlike 138 and 295 extensions ("I-895"), the connection to Hartford would have probly benefited both cities as long as sound planning for the areas around it were undertaken.

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I have no idea who said this, but it was someone with importance to Providence..

It basically said that we need to stop comparing Providence to the smaller regional cities, such as hartford and even Boston, and start talking about everything in a national perspective.. for a number of good reasons ;) which I dont rememeber :P

ANywhOO.. lets start doing that..

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I have no idea who said this, but it was someone with importance to Providence..

It basically said that we need to stop comparing Providence to the smaller regional cities, such as hartford and even Boston, and start talking about everything in a national perspective.. for a number of good reasons  ;) which I dont rememeber :P

ANywhOO.. lets start doing that..

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

To generate conversation, I wanted to ask: in what ways could the regional cities (Boston, Prov, Hartford, etc) collaborate? Mass transit is an obvious answer, but what else could they do together that wouldn't end up being an eventual competition?

- Garris

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Ineresting, but fairly rudimentary article on PVD v. Worcester:

WORCESTER -- On a warm spring day, Richard Kennedy, president of the Worcester Regional Chamber of Commerce, walked along a nearly empty street and turned into one of the few restaurants in downtown. The scene: low lights, subdued conversation, and mostly middle-aged men, save for an elderly couple or two.

On another spring day in Providence, developer Arnold ''Buff" Chace strode through downtown, passing new restaurants, coffee shops, and specialty stores, on his way to a New York-style bistro facing the Providence River. Here, sunlight brightened the interior, 20- and 30-something professionals crowded tables, conversation buzzed to a low roar.

All the Deets...

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Worcester has a smog of depression that coats everything. Maybe it was built on an indian burial ground, or the city made a deal w the devil and didnt keep up the payments. Whatever it is, the city has a palpable culture of negativity.

Other than that, it's an interesting and fun place. If you like dive bars and seedy atmosphere it rocks.

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Ineresting, but fairly rudimentary article on PVD v. Worcester:

WORCESTER -- On a warm spring day, Richard Kennedy, president of the Worcester Regional Chamber of Commerce, walked along a nearly empty street and turned into one of the few restaurants in downtown. The scene: low lights, subdued conversation, and mostly middle-aged men, save for an elderly couple or two.

On another spring day in Providence, developer Arnold ''Buff" Chace strode through downtown, passing new restaurants, coffee shops, and specialty stores, on his way to a New York-style bistro facing the Providence River. Here, sunlight brightened the interior, 20- and 30-something professionals crowded tables, conversation buzzed to a low roar.

All the Deets...

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Great article.

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Ineresting, but fairly rudimentary article on PVD v. Worcester:

WORCESTER -- On a warm spring day, Richard Kennedy, president of the Worcester Regional Chamber of Commerce, walked along a nearly empty street and turned into one of the few restaurants in downtown. The scene: low lights, subdued conversation, and mostly middle-aged men, save for an elderly couple or two.

On another spring day in Providence, developer Arnold ''Buff" Chace strode through downtown, passing new restaurants, coffee shops, and specialty stores, on his way to a New York-style bistro facing the Providence River. Here, sunlight brightened the interior, 20- and 30-something professionals crowded tables, conversation buzzed to a low roar.

All the Deets...

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I go to school at Clark U in Worcester, and i live near providence. Its true, there is so much more going on in Providence. Worcester is just a giant doughnut, everything is around the outside (malls, offices, sprawl, much less "culture") the downtown is a whole bunch of nothing. They are trying to change that though...

Worcester's development plan: http://www.worcestermass.org/development/

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Worcester has a smog of depression that coats everything. Maybe it was built on an indian burial ground, or the city made a deal w the devil and didnt keep up the payments. Whatever it is, the city has a palpable culture of negativity.

Other than that, it's an interesting and fun place. If you like dive bars and seedy atmosphere it rocks.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Good one! :lol: Having lived there for 6 years during the early and mid 90's, I can say that Worcesterites expect downtown to fair poorly no matter what projects are built. There is a whole psychology surrounding it's low expections and that is what you need to break.

I'm not a big fan of the Cianci days; however, for what he did to turn Rhode Islander's perception of Providence around was nothing short of genius. Despite the history of corruption known today, Cianci was the right man at the right time for the psychological idea of civic pride in Providence. He boosted the city's image with locals. Once we all started to think Providence was good, it was good! We all believe that despite our ups and downs, Providence is still headed in the right direction. Worcester doesn't have that at all. There is no sense of city. I've heard this before and I think it's true today that Providence is a little city; Worcester is a big town. Not that Worcester is a bad town. Indeed, I believe it's a good town. It just doesn't have the city mentality and pride that Providence now enjoys.

Let's not forget one important point, though. In 1990, as the article points out, both Providence and Worcester were in the same spot. It's food for thought in Worcester. I guess they should never stop trying. You never know which project will become known as the one that "marked the beginning of a turn around that sparked it all."

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I think their airport and air service is a joke. US Air completely pulled outta Worcester about a year or so ago because of a lack of business. MassPort could have taken over this airport and turned it into a regional airport that would have competed with both Providence and Manchester. Worcester, being close to Rt's 90, 290, 395 and 146 is at the crossroads of central Mass.

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I think their airport and air service is a joke. US Air completely pulled outta Worcester about a year or so ago because of a lack of business. MassPort could have taken over this airport and turned it into a regional airport that would have competed with both Providence and Manchester. Worcester, being close to Rt's 90, 290, 395 and 146 is at the crossroads of central Mass.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Hey guys..remember, Worcester is not in the same city or metro class as Providence. Further, a regional airport would impact Manchester (and to a lesser extent Boston) much more than Providence Airport.

I travel all over and I can tell you as far as business travellers are concerned, there are two NE options - Boston or Providence. All others are very local options.

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Good one!  :lol:  Having lived there for 6 years during the early and mid 90's, I can say that Worcesterites expect downtown to fair poorly no matter what projects are built.  There is a whole psychology surrounding it's low expections and that is what you need to break. 

I'm not a big fan of the Cianci days; however, for what he did to turn Rhode Islander's perception of Providence around was nothing short of genius.  Despite the history of corruption known today, Cianci was the right man at the right time for the psychological idea of civic pride in Providence.  He boosted the city's image with locals.  Once we all started to think Providence was good, it was good!  We all believe that despite our ups and downs, Providence is still headed in the right direction.  Worcester doesn't have that at all.  There is no sense of city.  I've heard this before and I think it's true today that Providence is a little city; Worcester is a big town.  Not that Worcester is a bad town.  Indeed, I believe it's a good town.  It just doesn't have the city mentality and pride that Providence now enjoys. 

Let's not forget one important point, though.  In 1990, as the article points out, both Providence and Worcester were in the same spot.  It's food for thought in Worcester.  I guess they should never stop trying.  You never know which project will become known as the one that "marked the beginning of a turn around that sparked it all."

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Worcester is a minor city and Providence is a major metro. Worcester has absolutely no national recognition of any type...they are not in the same class-period. Maybe Pawtucket and Worcester.

Providence is featured in major travel, food, recreation, arts and culture, quality of life, movies, and financial publications on a regular basis.

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I travel all over and I can tell you as far as business travellers are concerned, there are two NE options - Boston or Providence. All others are very local options.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Even Hartford? BTW, what happened to Hartford in this thread? It seemes to have become another Providence vs. Worcester thread.

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Even Hartford? BTW, what happened to Hartford in this thread? It seemes to have become another Providence vs. Worcester thread.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Well, that probably says something about Harford right there, doesn't it? I think the cities in line behind Providence are Manchester, Worcester, New Haven, and Hartford, in that order (Worcester and New Haven probably being tied).

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That's a big display of faith in Manchester, Cotuit.  Not to say that it's unjustified.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Manchester and New Hampshire as a whole have a lot more going for them than Worcester or Connecticut. New Hampshire is the fastest growing economy in New England, by a healthy margin. Manchester also has some good things on the go right now like the new ballfield, rejuvination of the river area, and more housing. Worcester and Harford both have renewal going on, but I think Manchester is in a better position than either of them. Manchester also has a healthy buzz. Things are happening in Hartford and Worcester, but I don't think the feelings about those cities have changed all that much (like the feelings people have about Providence have). In Providence we have a pretty positive outlook, regardless of what a lot of native Rhode Islanders will have you think, while in Hartford and Worcester I think the feelings are more along the lines of, 'let's hope this works.' Manchester has more of that Providence can do attitude than the nagging doubt that still plague Hartford and Worcester.

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