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markhollin

Three Thirty Three, 5 story, 69,000 sq. ft. office/11,000 sq. ft. retail, 11th Ave. South & Pine, The Gulch

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Yeah I'd be really interested to hear more details about the park. IMO that's one of the biggest deficiencies of the gulch as a neighborhood, but why are they putting valuable land into it? Are they doing it like jw marriott, as a temporary arrangement, or is there some kind of deal with metro?

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The only thing I see wrong with this is there needs to be either solar panels or a green roof atop it to reduce heat kept by a blank roof or at least create power for the building. That said, it's fantastic otherwise and really makes it pop within a sea of glass.

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7 hours ago, smeagolsfree said:

I hope the park is private/public otherwise it will be a homeless encampment.

That Church Street park is unfortunately placed right across from the free restrooms and AC/heat of the library.  How does the Ascend park fair with the homeless?

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7 hours ago, japan said:

That Church Street park is unfortunately placed right across from the free restrooms and AC/heat of the library.  How does the Ascend park fair with the homeless?

It’s not as bad as the Church Street park, but quite a few camp out in Walk of Fame Park, under the pedestrian bridge, and Riverfront Park. 

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7 hours ago, japan said:

That Church Street park is unfortunately placed right across from the free restrooms and AC/heat of the library.  How does the Ascend park fair with the homeless?

They hang out there too but not as much because there are no trees for them to hide in like ninjas. I have seen some creepy people in the dog park trying to mess with someone else's dog and also tried to go to the public restrooms there and low and behold a grouping of homeless folks hoarding the bathrooms. They will also hangout in the tunnel that runs under KVB.

 

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16 hours ago, smeagolsfree said:

I hope the park is private/public otherwise it will be a homeless encampment.

Crossing my fingers that the bridge falls through somehow, that'd help on this front.

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16 hours ago, NashRugger said:

The only thing I see wrong with this is there needs to be either solar panels or a green roof atop it to reduce heat kept by a blank roof or at least create power for the building. That said, it's fantastic otherwise and really makes it pop within a sea of glass.

If they don't do anything on the roof (other than the unsightly mechanical units that they ultimately are not showing in the renders) I would hope they would do a white TPO/EPDM roof. It is amazing how much energy would be saved by just having a white roof up there. Drop heat island effect, but also keep the mechanical units much cooler and running more efficiently. 

15 hours ago, PHofKS said:

Awesome infill for the Gulch. I'm liking the diverse architecture.

I love the use of brick and a desire to make this building a bit "older". So much of new developments around the county are fixed on glass, that it takes away alot of character from the style. 

 

I am not exactly what one would call a height advocate, but I was wondering this the other day about height in the gulch. Outside of Icon and the Thompson, why are all the buildings 5 or less stories? When the gulch neighborhood was planned was it a zoning thing?

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There's height, just not mega-tall. You've forgotten: Mercury View, Terrazzo, Gulch Crossings, 1212 and I'm sure there are a couple I've forgotten about.

 

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Is building the bridge JUST beneficial, or are there also costs? And if there are costs can we not discuss them openly? We would be fools not to consider all sides of an issue.

I believe Leif is a local to the Gulch and has every right to share concerns on items which may negatively impact his quality of life. Market Street Enterprises is a well-run developer and hopefully will proceed cautiously  to prevent unintended consequences which may kill the golden goose that is the Gulch. The much-discussed Church Street Park is a perfect example of a 'benefit' costing more than its worth. Metro  cannot raze the park fast enough for downtown residents. 

There is a saying about those who reside in Ivory Towers ....

 

36 minutes ago, BnaBreaker said:

So now we're actively rooting against the construction of beneficial civic projects because homeless people might also find them pleasant places to be?   Seems... misguided?

 

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21 minutes ago, nashville_bound said:

Is building the bridge JUST beneficial, or are there also costs? And if there are costs can we not discuss them openly? We would be fools not to consider all sides of an issue.
....

The financial cost is a separate issue altogether, and I never said we shouldn't consider all sides of the issue.  All I did was offer my take on the issue.

Quote

I believe Leif is a local to the Gulch and has every right to share concerns on items which may negatively impact his quality of life.

Who even came close to suggesting he doesn't 'have a right' to express his opinion?  I don't understand this reflex of pretending that someone merely offering their opinion is actually trying to stifle opposing opinions.

Quote

Market Street Enterprises is a well-run developer and hopefully will proceed cautiously  to prevent unintended consequences which may kill the golden goose that is the Gulch. The much-discussed Church Street Park is a perfect example of a 'benefit' costing more than its worth. Metro  cannot raze the park fast enough for downtown residents.

You are right to say that caution should be taken, because it is possible for things to get out of hand, as you accurately pointed out.  All I am saying though is that I think it is rather foolish to make the argument that we should essentially do away with the concept of pleasant public spaces because gross homeless people might enjoy those spaces as well.
 

Quote

There is a saying about those who reside in Ivory Towers

So the guy defending the homeless from the degradation coming from people who live in the literal ivory towers that surround them is the elitist in this scenario.  Makes sense.

Edited by BnaBreaker
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4 minutes ago, BnaBreaker said:

The financial cost is a separate issue altogether, and I never said we shouldn't consider all sides of the issue.  All I did was offer my take on the issue.

I was talking about 'costs' above and beyond the financial.... such as Leif's concern of an influx of homeless, some criminal or anti-social, as a result of the new short-cut the bridge would bring.

Your take seems to be more an aside critical of Leif's statement and less of one defending the bridge. If I am wrong then "my bad".

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5 minutes ago, BnaBreaker said:

So the guy defending the homeless from the degradation coming from people who live in the literal ivory towers that surround them is the elitist in this scenario.  Makes sense.

degradation? ha

All the virtue signaling in the world will not help even one homeless person. Building a park that attracts homeless people, down-and-out, criminal or insane - all while lowering the civic participation of residents, will not help even one homeless person.

The Ivory Tower comment is on point ad not necessarily directed to you ... pontificating from on-high is much easier than living with some of the on-the-ground consequences ...

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2 hours ago, CenterHill said:

Agree, I think we're focusing on the wrong thing.     Homelessness is a whole separate issue that all cities need to tackle, but it's not a reason to say we're going to quit building parks and civic spaces.   

I'm not really concerned about the bridge so much because of the homeless issue, though I know it is a concern that has been voiced.  I just think it is a expensive boondoggle now that the stairs/elevator exists in Crossings. I'd advocate taking that 30 million or whatever it is presently and putting it into homeless programs, affordability programs, etc. I don't think it is a simple deal to reallocate the funds but I think there are better uses 4-5 years on from the bridge's first announcement.

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