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Union West at CV| Creative Village | 15 Stories

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On 2/13/2019 at 10:55 PM, jrs2 said:

you don't mean Union West, right?  those are the photos you featured in your post.

I'm not sure how much of Union West is block construction vs wood frame (or if any wood is used at all), but what prompted me to even bring up the subject was damage to the EIFS or sheathing in the pictures I quoted. I tried to specifically point out areas in the pics to illustrate what I was talking about. In block construction, damage caused by water intrusion wouldn't be severe but in wood frame construction with OSB particle board etc, any damage caused by water intrusion would be very costly as mentioned in the OS article. I'm concerned about so many wood framed "stucco" apartments being built downtown because when the time comes to repair the damage, the money never seems to be available. Neglected buildings eventually lead to blight.

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Edited by nite owℓ

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2 hours ago, nite owℓ said:

I'm not sure how much of Union West is block construction vs wood frame (or if any wood is used at all), but what prompted me to even bring up the subject was damage to the EIFS or sheathing in the pictures I quoted. I tried to specifically point out areas in the pics to illustrate what I was talking about. In block construction, damage caused by water intrusion wouldn't be severe but in wood frame construction with OSB particle board etc, any damage caused by water intrusion would be very costly as mentioned in the OS article. I'm concerned about so many wood framed "stucco" apartments being built downtown because when the time comes to repair the damage, the money never seems to be available. Neglected buildings eventually lead to blight.

Yeah, I've been tracking this thing almost daily since it broke ground and aside from that sheathing, I don't think they've used any wood.  The 5 story apartment building a block from it, well, that's a haystack ready to ignite.

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They can't use wood. Under the Universal Building Code/International Building Code, wood frame construction is limited to structures of 6 stories or 85' tall. (See the excellent article I posted a link to on the previous page).  

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On ‎2‎/‎14‎/‎2019 at 8:29 AM, dcluley98 said:

Very interesting read. In short; materials are cheap, labor is cheap, projects are built to be flipped to REIts and code allows them to be built. The downside, "sticks burn".

The article does point out numerous benefits to multi-story stick builds.

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16 hours ago, dcluley98 said:

They can't use wood. Under the Universal Building Code/International Building Code, wood frame construction is limited to structures of 6 stories or 85' tall. (See the excellent article I posted a link to on the previous page).  

OTOH, I've seen some articles that say otherwise...

https://www.csemag.com/articles/evaluating-high-rise-wood-construction/

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/01/business/timber-wood-construction-real-estate.html

https://www.dezeen.com/2018/07/24/framework-lever-architecture-portland-oregon-wooden-high-rise-put-on-hold/

 

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There are some relaxations in the code for "engineered wood" products that are not wood like standard timbers. Basically, they laminate smaller pieces of wood/fibrous materials along with fire retardant, epoxy, and other binding/strengthening products that allows it to meet higher standards for combustibility. I'm pretty sure that is how they are creating these taller structures to get through code. Not familiar with each one, but engineered materials are not the same as your regular "stick-built" structures you see around here and are, in fact, more expensive. 

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Yes, that's all true and covered in some depth in the articles I posted. I worked for companies who occasionally used "LVL" beams in heavy load applications a good couple of decades ago, so they've been around for quite awhile and I'm familiar with their properties and how they're manufactured.

But, it's still wood and they are using it to go far beyond six stories in height. I would imagine (wood imagine?) ;-) that the interior wall framing is all "stick built", though.

I posted on this subject here at UP a couple of years ago or so and, along with other UP'ers, expressed concern over not only increased fire danger, but possible structural failure due to moisture rot caused by water intrusion and even termites.

I don't think I'd want to live on the 20th floor of a wood high rise.

Especially one that's been around for several years.

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2 hours ago, dcluley98 said:

There are some relaxations in the code for "engineered wood" products that are not wood like standard timbers. Basically, they laminate smaller pieces of wood/fibrous materials along with fire retardant, epoxy, and other binding/strengthening products that allows it to meet higher standards for combustibility. I'm pretty sure that is how they are creating these taller structures to get through code. Not familiar with each one, but engineered materials are not the same as your regular "stick-built" structures you see around here and are, in fact, more expensive. 

The engineered wood have come down a lot in price as well, they're starting to be used in more and more places. And I've seen some impressive demos, exposing the wood to moisture, fire, etc, and at least according to the demos, it survives and looks fine.

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Yeah. I'm not sure on the long term durability and safety of the wood composite materials. There hasn't been an adequate amount of time to see the long-term results of such construction materials. I am with you. I would much rather live in a concrete and steel structure than these new "woodish" type structures for a high rise. The benefits of the renewable nature of wood products is intriguing, however. 

I have also seen some really aesthetically pleasing laminate timber construction in places like church sanctuaries and exposed beam loft style condos, as well as fake composite decking boards for water resistance to specifically address the downsides for potential rot in traditional lumber. It is an interesting field that is constantly evolving. I don't think we will know the ramifications for sure until a few years down the road. 

Agreed Aent. It is getting cheaper as it becomes more standardized and adopted. Still more expensive than regular tree lumber, however. 

Edited by dcluley98

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From the article dculey posted last week

"Wood’s green credentials have helped spur a recent worldwide push for more construction with “mass timber”—softwood lumber glued together and compressed into thick beams, columns, and panels. The tallest such structure completed so far is an 18-story dormitory at the University of British Columbia, in Vancouver. Oregon has already changed its code to allow mass timber buildings of that scale, and the 2021 IBC is set to do the same."

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On ‎2‎/‎13‎/‎2019 at 3:42 PM, AndyPok1 said:

I dunno about when you went to college, but I ate at Subway probably once a week if not more.  We had a local donut shop, so no Dunkin, but same difference.  I can't remember ever going to a chain Darden type.  Maybe once a year for bottomless pasta?  Applebees for late night happy hour occasionally.  Basically wherever the special was.  Place called Mad Mex had all you could eat burritos for like $6 bucks on Mondays.  That was awesome.

*cough* Buckeye Donuts rocks! *cough*

https://buckeyedonuts.net/

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They sold buckeyes, as every decent baking establishment in the great state of Ohio does.  That being the state that is high (HI) in the middle and round (O-O) on both ends, thank you very much.

Edited by HankStrong
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In a true sense, a buckeye is a nut from the Buckeye tree.  If you've seen Brutus from TOSU, his head is a Buckeye nut.  The real ones are about 1" diameter.  They are chocolate brown with a tan circle on top. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aesculus_glabra) You can't eat them and they are basically only good for making necklaces in elementary school or throwing at each other.

In a confectionary sense, a buckeye is a ball of peanut butter dipped in chocolate almost 90% of the way up.  They are also about 1" in diameter and the resulting candy looks pretty close to the real thing.  They are chocolate brown with a tan circle on top. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buckeye_candy) 

 

If you like Reece's Cups or Reece's Pieces or peanut butter M&M's, you'll probably like Buckeyes.  Although, they have a much heavier peanut butter to chocolate ratio much like the Giant Reece's Cups and not the normal ones, the tiny Halloween ones, or the much smaller handful candies.

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1 hour ago, HankStrong said:

In a true sense, a buckeye is a nut from the Buckeye tree.  If you've seen Brutus from TOSU, his head is a Buckeye nut.  The real ones are about 1" diameter.  They are chocolate brown with a tan circle on top. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aesculus_glabra) You can't eat them and they are basically only good for making necklaces in elementary school or throwing at each other.

In a confectionary sense, a buckeye is a ball of peanut butter dipped in chocolate almost 90% of the way up.  They are also about 1" in diameter and the resulting candy looks pretty close to the real thing.  They are chocolate brown with a tan circle on top. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buckeye_candy) 

If you like Reece's Cups or Reece's Pieces or peanut butter M&M's, you'll probably like Buckeyes.  Although, they have a much heavier peanut butter to chocolate ratio much like the Giant Reece's Cups and not the normal ones, the tiny Halloween ones, or the much smaller handful candies.

This is also called a "Buckeye"...

common_buckeye01.jpg

For obvious reasons. 

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We're way off topic but... yes, the buckeye is the state tree of Ohio.  The nuts they produce have two halves (similar to most peanuts).  Except one half is poisonous.  Squirrels somehow have the ability to know which side and don't eat the poisonous side, so the yard gets filled with half eaten buckeyes.

And yes, I was referring to Buckeye Donuts.  Fun fact, I ran the student tv station (aptly named Buckeye TV).  At one point before I took it over, we decided to try to be a real tv station and sell ad time.  Someone convinced Buckeye Donuts they should buy an ad.  We would even shoot it for them.  I think for like $100 they got like two years of advertisement because we only had like 3 commercials.  Its also the most 70s SNL style ad ever.

Also, OAR has Road Outside Columbus if you want a song

 

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2 hours ago, orlandoguy said:

That’s what she said.

I was gonna post that earlier today but thought better of it. :lol:

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