orange87

Is downtown Orlando a tourist destination and is there "nothing to do there?"

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That's why several billion dollars have been invested in downtown over the last several years, right?

That's the thing that escapes me - downtown Orlando is one of the fastest growing cores in the Sunbelt, both in terms of investment and new residents. But spend one day in here and you'd think we were Macon. Fascinating.

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1 hour ago, spenser1058 said:

That's why several billion dollars have been invested in downtown over the last several years, right?

That's the thing that escapes me - downtown Orlando is one of the fastest growing cores in the Sunbelt, both in terms of investment and new residents. But spend one day in here and you'd think we were Macon. Fascinating.

If what you say is true and yet DTO is still only where it is now, it just goes to show how far behind we were to begin with and how much catching up we had and still have to do.

Many of us want to honestly discuss both the pluses and minuses.  

Simply cheerleading doesn't advance understanding or insight. ;) :)

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I dunno... maybe I'm just different.  When I go to other cities I basically eat, walk around, take pictures of fountains or other weird geometry that I think would make a cool picture, and drink.  I can do all of that here as well.  Unless you're a *destination* attraction, I don't really know what else people are doing...

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For DTO to get that “big city” feel, the future lies in Parramore. A continuous stretch of mid-to-Highrise buildings along Church Street all the way to the Citrus Bowl could help to push the geographic center of “downtown” a bit westward with nodes pushing outward from there. 

If this is possible, the next few years and proposals are key, starting with the Magic development. 

Its entirely plausible - cities across the country are heavily investing in their urban wastelands (some more successful than others).

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1 hour ago, prahaboheme said:

For DTO to get that “big city” feel, the future lies in Parramore. A continuous stretch of mid-to-Highrise buildings along Church Street all the way to the Citrus Bowl could help to push the geographic center of “downtown” a bit westward with nodes pushing outward from there. 

If this is possible, the next few years and proposals are key, starting with the Magic development. 

Its entirely plausible - cities across the country are heavily investing in their urban wastelands (some more successful than others).

I think part of that might require a political renegotiation that no one is anxious to wade into yet. 

When the Frederick administration was rezoning to both save downtown neighborhoods and to restrict available land for development (with the goal of increasing density in the core,) an agreement was made to leave much of Parramore alone (given the way development has gone, I'm guessing nothing west of Parramore Ave., but a guess is all it is.)

That followed a lot of negotiation between the city and African-American leaders who were still angry their section of town took the biggest hit when I4 and the E-W went through, and amid much concern over whether the expansion of JYP at the time (a huge Frederick priority back then between OWG Rd and I4) would do the same.

As you might imagine, the discussions were fraught as a lot of racial issues that had stayed just below the surface bubbled up. Since that time 30-some years ago, no one has been anxious to revisit it. It will be interesting to see if any of the political calculus has changed going forward.

Edited by spenser1058

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On ‎10‎/‎7‎/‎2018 at 3:43 PM, prahaboheme said:

For DTO to get that “big city” feel, the future lies in Parramore. A continuous stretch of mid-to-Highrise buildings along Church Street all the way to the Citrus Bowl could help to push the geographic center of “downtown” a bit westward with nodes pushing outward from there. 

If this is possible, the next few years and proposals are key, starting with the Magic development. 

Its entirely plausible - cities across the country are heavily investing in their urban wastelands (some more successful than others).

Yeah, I'd like to see that as well, all the way out to the Citrus Bowl as well.

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On ‎10‎/‎7‎/‎2018 at 12:36 PM, spenser1058 said:

That's why several billion dollars have been invested in downtown over the last several years, right?

That's the thing that escapes me - downtown Orlando is one of the fastest growing cores in the Sunbelt, both in terms of investment and new residents. But spend one day in here and you'd think we were Macon. Fascinating.

good point, but I gotta tell you, I was in Akron, OH this past year and I got a way larger urban feel from their downtown than here.  maybe the slushy snow had something to do with it, but regardless, there seemed to be way more development.  And maybe that's just how it is when comparing ORL to these northern midwestern cities that are mid-sized.  It's like with Nashville...if you look at their skyline and focus on the shorter buildings, there are a ton of them which in contrast with the larger ones makes the place look huge.

I think they tore down too many old buildings downtown over the years.  They tore them down, left vacant parcels for years, and now they are getting filled one project at a time. 

I think another thing here is that there are too many short and long projects versus smaller footprint projects and more of them.  It gives the illusion that there's not much here in numbers versus actual residential units and office space.  Know what I mean?

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2 hours ago, orlandouprise said:

DTO imo does not feel like a CBD...it feels more like Brooklyn... just a cool neighborhood...not a place of commerce

Brooklyn was a separate city until 1898 (and even today, some still refer to the merger with NYC as "The Great Mistake of 1898.") Even today, Brooklyn is the most populous borough and has recently had arguably NYC's biggest "cool" factor. I'll take that for us!

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1 hour ago, spenser1058 said:

Brooklyn was a separate city until 1898 (and even today, some still refer to the merger with NYC as "The Great Mistake of 1898.") Even today, Brooklyn is the most populous borough and has recently had arguably NYC's biggest "cool" factor. I'll take that for us!

And, according to Mr. Olmstead himself, his greatest professional achievement:  Prospect Park

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