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Your Perception of Richmond- SMALL, MEDIUM, LARGE ?


DalWill

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Perception as of right now is medium. As the population grows, the economy becomes more robust (in the manifestation of more F500 companies, a busier airport (we're already on the way with that)), I think we'll see that status shift. We will become large, but comparatively to other cities in the Northeast or Southeast, we're smaller.

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I’d concur that Richmond is a medium-sized city.  For me, it can afford to get much bigger though.  I’d like to be able to travel the country and not have to say I’m from “Richmond, Virginia”....instead of just “Richmond.”  No one really knows where or what Richmond even is outside of the east coast.  Truth!!

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I think there may be a national perception that Richmond is smaller than it actually is.

Major league sports and hub airports seem to help perception. Getting the Super Bowl or a political convention seems to help with national prominence in places like Charlotte and Jacksonville. 

Austin is a city that seems to be a big small town. Tech industry has made it "big" but it wants to stay small and quirky. 

I'm wondering if the internet hub development could move Richmond closer to where Austin is in terms of prominence? 

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15 hours ago, DalWill said:

I've personally never looked at the city as small.... AT ALL (outsiders , of course, do). We are considered mid-sized, for sure However, I think, sooner or later, we might be growing out of mid-sized as well.

hahahahahhahahahahahhahaahahah

[BREATHE]

hahahahahahahahahahahahhahahaha

Richmond is smaller than Winston-Salem; I play mostly in the Charlotte thread, and Charlotteans are just as guilty of homerism (eg NYC is busy building one and a half downtown Charlottes right now, and that might be conservative, but that won't deter that board from losing their minds about a 600 foot building), but Richmond is basically "not podunk."

Cute.

/Troll

//is it still a troll if it's true?

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22 minutes ago, Tyrone Wiggum said:

hahahahahhahahahahahhahaahahah

[BREATHE]

hahahahahahahahahahahahhahahaha

Richmond is smaller than Winston-Salem; I play mostly in the Charlotte thread, and Charlotteans are just as guilty of homerism (eg NYC is busy building one and a half downtown Charlottes right now, and that might be conservative, but that won't deter that board from losing their minds about a 600 foot building), but Richmond is basically "not podunk."

Cute.

/Troll

//is it still a troll if it's true?

At 667,733, Winston-Salem metro is half the size of Richmond, however, its CSA is a little bit larger.  

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31 minutes ago, skycity said:

I think there may be a national perception that Richmond is smaller than it actually is.

Major league sports and hub airports seem to help perception. Getting the Super Bowl or a political convention seems to help with national prominence in places like Charlotte and Jacksonville. 

Austin is a city that seems to be a big small town. Tech industry has made it "big" but it wants to stay small and quirky. 

I'm wondering if the internet hub development could move Richmond closer to where Austin is in terms of prominence? 

See THAT is the same perception that I had to.  I don't mind at all succeeding as an international, popular mid-sized city. However,  I know that we are going to be bigger than where we are now (which is always a good).

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1 hour ago, Tyrone Wiggum said:

hahahahahhahahahahahhahaahahah

[BREATHE]

hahahahahahahahahahahahhahahaha

Richmond is smaller than Winston-Salem; I play mostly in the Charlotte thread, and Charlotteans are just as guilty of homerism (eg NYC is busy building one and a half downtown Charlottes right now, and that might be conservative, but that won't deter that board from losing their minds about a 600 foot building), but Richmond is basically "not podunk."

Cute.

/Troll

//is it still a troll if it's true?

See?  This is what I mean when I say people outside of Richmond really don’t think Richmond is even on the map.  I’ve travelled a lot and have lived all around the US and people are always like, “Richmond who?!  Where is that?”  Richmond needs to make a better name for itself that people around the country can identify with, otherwise it will continue to be the city no one knows much about.  Seems that with all the ad companies in town that this would be fairly easy to do...or like someone else said, it needs to be known for being a tech hub, a bank hub...just something positive.  

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2 hours ago, eandslee said:

I’d concur that Richmond is a medium-sized city.  For me, it can afford to get much bigger though.  I’d like to be able to travel the country and not have to say I’m from “Richmond, Virginia”....instead of just “Richmond.”  No one really knows where or what Richmond even is outside of the east coast.  Truth!!

I actually find that even on the West Coast now I can just say Richmond where ten years ago it would be assumed I was talking about the San Francisco suburb.  Even internationally, ever since the UCI, many people seem to know Richmond.

Amusingly, when I arrived in Las Vegas the other week, my Lyft driver turned out to have gone to the same high school here.  Since he had left around a low point in the city's history, it was fun catching him up on where Richmond is now in comparison.  He was not the only Richmonder I ran into out there either.

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Seems like Richmonders like Las Vegas...we should have direct flights to LAS from RIC by now!!  

Thanks for sharing.  I hope the knowledge of Richmond is starting to spread.  My experience has obviously been different, but I’m encouraged by your report!

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Having been brought up in Culpeper, and spending much of my adulthood in the DC area, I think I have a pretty good feel for the relativity of small-vs-large! Richmond strikes me as being at the upper end of medium. But it often feels like small town, and I don't mean that in a good way. I love how much the city and metro have become more cosmopolitan, but there are some who still have regressive ideas, and those few are able to poison the external view of our town. Richmond also has a HUGE inferiority complex, and that puts a damper on being able to sell the rest of the world on what has actually been accomplished here. I've seen that attitude change a little since I moved here 20 years ago, but there is still a LOT of self-loathing and defeatism that needs to be overcome. We've got something great going on here, and we definitely need more hometown cheerleaders shouting our own praises.

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Between medium and large.  I think of US cities more in tiers than in size.  Tiers are based on the city's offerings, a term that I interpret broadly.  A city like San Diego scores highly on quality of life because of the weather, but is not a major economic center and lacks history/character.  Dallas and Houston are major economic  and population centers, but they lack unique characteristics and history, so they are tier three cities.  

Tier 1 (Global cities) -- New York, LA, Chicago, SF, and DC

Tier 2 (National cities with the potential to become global) -- Boston, Miami, Philadelphia, Seattle, Denver, and Atlanta

Tier 3 (National cities with a strong draw economically, historically,  or wield significant influence) -- Dallas, Houston, Austin, St. Louis, Baltimore, Detroit, and Minneapolis

Tier 4 (Regional cities with the potential to become national because they possess unique aspects, growing economies, and high qualities of life) --Portland, San Diego, Nashville, New Orleans, Pittsburgh, and Richmond

Tier 5 (Banal places that, while large and prosperous, offer very little beyond a mass produced experience) -- Tampa,  Kansas City, Phoenix, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Columbus, Raleigh, Charlotte, Jacksonville, etc.

This is by no means exhaustive and I will spare the board my exact reasoning behind each.  Curious as to what people think.

Edited by Wahoo 07
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  • 2 years later...
On 8/5/2019 at 10:49 PM, eandslee said:

Thanks for the shout out!  I think Henrico Weather hits the nail on the head...I just cheer real loud because I’m trying to get others to do the same.  I think Richmond has a lot to cheer about, but like Henrico Weather mentioned, there are many who are self-defeating and don’t believe Richmond can do anything great. I wonder if that sentiment has been passed down since the end of the Civil War after, presumably, “all was lost?”  Terrible how that feeling still resonates - it shouldn’t. Richmond is a great town - many great things going for it and has tons of potential...many don’t see it because of either the past or they haven’t been outside the state in a long time.  I just want Richmond to achieve its potential. I’m grateful for people in town who have great vision just like those in support of this huge Navy Hill project!  This is what Richmond is capable of and should continue to do. Richmond needs to capitalize on what it CAN do and not wallow in what it has failed to do in the past.  Richmond is a very different city today than it was even 5 years ago!!  It CAN achieve so much more!  BELIEVE IT!!

I've lived right near or in Richmond for the past 40 years. I appreciate the fact that many natives are passionate about their home town. It's good to feel pride and excitement for the place you live in. But, I fear that this blind, rose-tinted view of things can have a damaging effect where people tend to ignore what's in front of them. Navy Hill didn't work out, redesigning the Diamond didn't work out, bringing any pro team here never works out, Disney wanted to go to NoVA but nobody wanted that, schools and roads are still terrible, etc etc etc etc etc

 

At some point, it's like .. what is Richmond's deal? Is it a fear of growth? a fear of white people coming to build things? Constant corruption all over the place and all I hear from natives is that it's a great city because there's a river. I want to like my home city but I simply can't do it anymore.

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On 8/2/2019 at 11:08 AM, skycity said:

I think there may be a national perception that Richmond is smaller than it actually is.

That's definitely true. Part of that is the limited geographic area, so comparing populations of course Richmond looks tiny, but those other cities are ten times the geographic area, you need to include Cfield and Henrico populations for an accurate comparison.

I grew up here and didn't travel a ton, my parents are not from here and they were always kind of down on Richmond despite staying here for 45 years.  They always said "Richmond is so tiny" so that's what I believed. Then I went to cities like Charlotte, and Nashville, and Pittsburgh that were supposed "bigger cities" and they were hardly any bigger than Richmond. Richmond is much bigger than people think, even many people who live here.

 

That said it's definitely medium, on the smaller side of medium but plenty of room to grow and ability to do so if NIMBYs and inept city council got out of the way.

 

 

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On 8/9/2019 at 11:05 AM, Wahoo 07 said:

 

Tier 5 (Banal places that, while large and prosperous, offer very little beyond a mass produced experience) -- Tampa,  Kansas City, Phoenix, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Columbus, Raleigh, Charlotte, Jacksonville, etc.

 

I'd mostly agree with this - Jacksonville, Charlotte, Raleigh, and Phoenix are the epitome of banal cities.  Just no culture at all.  Everyone who lives there's favorite restaurant is Applebees.   

But Cleveland has a ton of character and the place is coming back.  Tampa has some Cuban culture and waterfront stuff that makes it a bit more interesting, but yeah the newer areas are super bland, I'd put Atlanta in that category as well. Columbus' downtown is boring, but The Short North, German Village, etc are great cultural areas, Ohio St adds to it.

Haven't been to Cincy or KC but I feel like they probably shouldn't be on that list.

Edited by 123fakestreet
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