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Theurbandeveloper

What do you think Greenville SC should do for its downtown as for growth ,and new design?

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In my opinion I think that Greenville SC should go more out of the mid range building range. Don't get me wrong Greenville SC an amazing city. But i would love to see taller buildings so when I come to the downtown area it would overwhelm me  and others as well. But I think eventually Greenville will but i just would love to see it.!  As far as growing I would love to see Greenville to have better transport around the city. But walkability is great right now but not everyone wants to walk. But I don't mind but there are the elderly and other people who could really use public transport.  This rendering looks amazing,I would love to see this pattern more around Greenville. And with the One City Plaza I think it looks amazing and more areas would be amazing.! Screen-Shot-2018-11-12-at-4.12.09-PM-970x545.png

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