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ironchapman

Your state's oldest cities.

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What are your states oldest cities/settlements?

Any state that you know of is fine, too.

GA's two oldest:

Savannah (1733)

Augusta (1736)

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Arkansas

Arkansas Post 1686

Although I guess since it was founded by the French is was probably something more like

Post D'Arkansas

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New Mexico

Santa Fe 1609-1611

Don't think they are positive of the exact date.

In 1598 the Spanish visited a Indian pueblo a little north of Santa Fe's location and rechristened the pueblo as San Juan after the Native Americans left or were driven off. But the town didn't last long. Also in the same region the Spanish established San Gabriel around 1600. But it also didn't last. Of course there are also Native American settlements. Acoma is believed to have been established in the 1000's and it is still inhabited.

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Arizona

Tucson - 1775

Originally established by Spanish settlers as an outpost called "Presidio de San Augustin." The Pima Indians had been living here long before that though, of course.

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Maryland:

St. Mary's City 1634

Annapolis 1649

St. Mary's City was the site of the first settlement, the equivalent of Jamestown or Plymouth was the capital of Maryland until 1695. Annapolis was made the capital and has been ever since.

Baltimore was not founded until after 1700, and was not a city of size or importance until the early 1800's, I believe.

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St Augustine - 1565

Pensacola - 1559, 1698, 1723 and for good in 1754

both were chartered in 1822.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Isn't St Augustine the one of the nation's oldest cities?

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St. Augustine claims to be the US's oldest continously occupied city (by european settlers).

from: http://www.nationmaster.com/encyclopedia/S...ustine,-Florida

St. Augustine is the oldest continually occupied European settlement in the continental United States, only San Juan, Puerto Rico predates the city as the oldest settlement within the territory of the United States. It was founded by Pedro Men�ndez de Avil�s on August 28, 1565, the feast day of St. Augustine, and consequently named by him San Agust�n. This was 21 years before the English settlement at Roanoke Island in Virginia Colony.

In 1586 it was attacked and burned by Sir Francis Drake. In 1668 it was plundered by pirates and most of the inhabitants killed.

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Alaska's is Nome (1901) I believe.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

That can't be right. The Russians arrived in Sitka in 1799, and the state was sold to the US in 1867. There were settlements in the state prior to it's purchase by the US. Sitka was the territorial capital from 1867 through 1906.

A search for "oldest city in Alaska" shows that both Skagway and Kodiak make the claim. Kodiak claims to have been settled by the Russians in 1791, can't find a date for Skagway. Though there is a claim that it was the first incorporated city in Alaska, June 28, 1900.

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That can't be right. The Russians arrived in Sitka in 1799, and the state was sold to the US in 1867. There were settlements in the state prior to it's purchase by the US. Sitka was the territorial capital from 1867 through 1906.

A search for "oldest city in Alaska" shows that both Skagway and Kodiak make the claim. Kodiak claims to have been settled by the Russians in 1791, can't find a date for Skagway. Though there is a claim that it was the first incorporated city in Alaska, June 28, 1900.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I am sorry if that upset you that I made a mistake. Nome is "Alaska's oldest continuous first class city". I am humane and do make mistakes! You are right, Skagway does claim to be the oldest incorporated city. Sorry Again!

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I am sorry if that upset you that I made a mistake.  Nome is "Alaska's oldest  continuous first class city".  I am humane and do make mistakes!  You are right, Skagway does claim to be the oldest incorporated city.  Sorry Again!

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Willa, I don't think he was dissing you, just clearing up an error.

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Michigan

Detroit (1701)

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Actually, Sault Ste. Marie is the oldest city in Michigan, founded in 1668.

The International Bridge between the Sault Ste. Maries

IntBridge.JPG

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Virginia's first permament settlement was Jamestown in 1607.

Although in North Carolina today, Roanoke Island was originally part of Virginia, and that was the first English colony in the present day United States in 1585. This colony dissapeared though and there is no definite explanation for it to this day. (Go to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roanoke_Island for a really interesting article on this)

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Ecuador(Nation):

Quito, founded in 1517 by the Spanish, much, much earlier by the natives of the region. It was an important city for the Incas... :thumbsup::ph34r:

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Hmm, Vermont's oldest city is Vergennes, but the third oldest in the US?

Vergennes - Vermont's Oldest City

Vergennes was established in 1788 and is the third oldest city in the United States and Vermont's oldest city. Only Hartford and New Haven, Connecticut are older than Vergennes, Vermont.

Click here for the website I found this information at. Anyone have any idea why this is said? Other posts in this thread conflict with their claim to being the third oldest.

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Hmm, Vermont's oldest city is Vergennes, but the third oldest in the US?

Click here for the website I found this information at. Anyone have any idea why this is said? Other posts in this thread conflict with their claim to being the third oldest.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I'm assuming they're not including St Augustine or Santa Fe and such because the Spanish founded them. They probably mean third oldest English settled city.

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