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This forum desperately needs downvotes back smdh.

Off the top of my head: Uniform scientifically-based recommendations for states to follow A federal entity which holds states accountable for not following recommendations (to the extent

Commence rant.  Thank you, Governor Cooper, as a Democrat in a purple state, you may have the crappiest job in the nation right now.   The governor is responsible for the health, safety and welf

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From Johns Hopkins

 

Infections:

COVID-19: Approximately 121,564 cases worldwide; 1,050 cases in the U.S. as of Mar. 11, 2020.

Flu: Estimated 1 billion cases worldwide; 9.3 million to 45 million cases in the U.S. per year.

 

Deaths

COVID-19: Approximately 4,373 deaths reported worldwide; 29 deaths in the U.S., as of Mar. 11, 2020.

Flu: 291,000 to 646,000 deaths worldwide; 12,000 to 61,000 deaths in the U.S. per year.

 

 

This isn't to say don't take it seriously, just keep it in perspective.

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2 hours ago, SentioVenia said:

From Johns Hopkins

 

Infections:

COVID-19: Approximately 121,564 cases worldwide; 1,050 cases in the U.S. as of Mar. 11, 2020.

Flu: Estimated 1 billion cases worldwide; 9.3 million to 45 million cases in the U.S. per year.

 

Deaths

COVID-19: Approximately 4,373 deaths reported worldwide; 29 deaths in the U.S., as of Mar. 11, 2020.

Flu: 291,000 to 646,000 deaths worldwide; 12,000 to 61,000 deaths in the U.S. per year.

 

 

This isn't to say don't take it seriously, just keep it in perspective.

“I mean people always say, 'Well, the flu does this, the flu does that,'” Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), said Wednesday during a hearing before the House Oversight and Reform Committee.

“The flu has a mortality rate of 0.1 percent. This has a mortality rate of 10 times that. That’s the reason I want to emphasize we have to stay ahead of the game in preventing this,” he added.

 

https://thehill.com/changing-america/well-being/prevention-cures/487086-coronavirus-10-times-more-lethal-than-seasonal

 

Trump to address the nation tonight at 9PM EST. 

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This event will  (should) encourage employers to learn how many offices are necessary and how many employees must be on site to maintain or improve productivity. How much travel is necessary. How many meetings are worthwhile for the good of the company rather than a treat for employees.

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16 minutes ago, tarhoosier said:

This event will  (should) encourage employers to learn how many offices are necessary and how many employees must be on site to maintain or improve productivity. How much travel is necessary. How many meetings are worthwhile for the good of the company rather than a treat for employees.

I wrote a letter to the editor (which I'm not expecting to get published) basically saying that businesses and organizations can't see this as an isolated incident--epidemiologists and the like are saying this is going to happen with increasing frequency--and the remedial efforts some orgs are starting to put into place now need to become the new normal. Specifically, I am seeing a disjuncture in the discussions of higher level systems (or lack thereof) in the media and the individual efforts we're encouraged to take--there's a gaping hole between the two.

It may sound crazy, but I think we've got to make it a priority, and insist, that our view and expectations of janitorial and cleaning services change, radically. The things they principally do now--cleaning for cosmetic purposes (vacuuming, washing windows, dusting) and basic hygiene (which obviously still has to be done) need to be superseded by routine, consistent and rigorous disinfecting of the objects people touch every day: doorknobs, elevator buttons, light switches, sink faucets, etc. Those things don't get cleaned now unless they look smudged or dirty, but the operational focus of our cleaning staffs have to be flipped, to focus first on the things that are trafficked the most by human hands. And businesses and organizations need to pay for either the additional hours required, or raise wages, and/or for training. Just this week I saw our building's on staff maintenance guy dutifully squeegee-ing our front doors and lobby, and I wanted to scream at him that he had more important things to focus on, but of course his mandate is to make sure our building entrance *looks* clean at all times. 

I hate the often ridiculous over professionalization of so many facets of our society, but our cleaning crews--or at least select members of each of them--need to be transformed into Infection Prevention Technicians (or something like that). 

Companies need to really think about how much this event is (and is ultimately) going to cost them, individually and as an economy, and perform a true cost-benefit analysis. Paying more or better wages to these IPTs, as part of a dedicated budget line item, will be well worth the expense--and come on, it won't, in the scope of most businesses, cost them all that much more.    

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I was in NYC M-W and as I left my room to check out the maid was waiting to enter. I asked if there were special efforts on her part and before I could finish my sentence she said "SOMANYCHEMICALS". She added that she was willing to do this because she was protecting herself at the same time.

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2 hours ago, ertley said:

I wrote a letter to the editor (which I'm not expecting to get published) basically saying that businesses and organizations can't see this as an isolated incident--epidemiologists and the like are saying this is going to happen with increasing frequency--and the remedial efforts some orgs are starting to put into place now need to become the new normal. Specifically, I am seeing a disjuncture in the discussions of higher level systems (or lack thereof) in the media and the individual efforts we're encouraged to take--there's a gaping hole between the two.

It may sound crazy, but I think we've got to make it a priority, and insist, that our view and expectations of janitorial and cleaning services change, radically. The things they principally do now--cleaning for cosmetic purposes (vacuuming, washing windows, dusting) and basic hygiene (which obviously still has to be done) need to be superseded by routine, consistent and rigorous disinfecting of the objects people touch every day: doorknobs, elevator buttons, light switches, sink faucets, etc. Those things don't get cleaned now unless they look smudged or dirty, but the operational focus of our cleaning staffs have to be flipped, to focus first on the things that are trafficked the most by human hands. And businesses and organizations need to pay for either the additional hours required, or raise wages, and/or for training. Just this week I saw our building's on staff maintenance guy dutifully squeegee-ing our front doors and lobby, and I wanted to scream at him that he had more important things to focus on, but of course his mandate is to make sure our building entrance *looks* clean at all times. 

I hate the often ridiculous over professionalization of so many facets of our society, but our cleaning crews--or at least select members of each of them--need to be transformed into Infection Prevention Technicians (or something like that). 

Companies need to really think about how much this event is (and is ultimately) going to cost them, individually and as an economy, and perform a true cost-benefit analysis. Paying more or better wages to these IPTs, as part of a dedicated budget line item, will be well worth the expense--and come on, it won't, in the scope of most businesses, cost them all that much more.    

I'm pretty sure most places have understaffed janitorial crews (person) for what you're asking. They hit as much as they can that offers the most bang for buck. So pretty much what people see. I think what might help the issue you've brought up the most is people just washing their dick grabbers when they leave the restroom.

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Two different worlds in Charlotte at the moment.

My family and I are holed up at home for who knows how long, feeling like the world is coming to an end. Meanwhile, every 20 year old in Mecklenburg county is pounding beers  at Charlotte Beer Garden,  Wooden Robot and even Unknown. A whole other class of people are smushed shoulder to shoulder waiting for chicken at Prices. [I am neither scolding nor changing my behavior, I am just observing from my bike]. 

 

 

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29 minutes ago, kermit said:

Two different worlds in Charlotte at the moment.

My family and I are holed up at home for who knows how long, feeling like the world is coming to an end. Meanwhile, every 20 year old in Mecklenburg county is pounding beers  at Charlotte beer garden or Wooden Robot. A whole other class of people are smushed shoulder to shoulder waiting for chicken at Prices. [not scolding or changing my behavior, just observing from my bike]. 

 

 

It’s quite insane how not seriously this city is taking it. 

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1 hour ago, Jt282506 said:

It’s quite insane how not seriously this city is taking it. 

I do wonder if this lack of seriousness is due to a lack of information (due largely to the self-curated SM bubble that all of us live in) or just 20 year olds being aware that Corona is no big deal for them statistically? 

[Yes, I do understand the issue of young folks spreading the bug to others who are at greater risk, I am just wondering about their psychology. To be fair, if I  was in my 20s and lived alone I would probably be cavalier about the risk as well.] 

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2 hours ago, kermit said:

Two different worlds in Charlotte at the moment.

My family and I are holed up at home for who knows how long, feeling like the world is coming to an end. Meanwhile, every 20 year old in Mecklenburg county is pounding beers  at Charlotte Beer Garden,  Wooden Robot and even Unknown. A whole other class of people are smushed shoulder to shoulder waiting for chicken at Prices. [I am neither scolding nor changing my behavior, I am just observing from my bike]. 

Trying to convince 20 year old's to sit in their apartments alone and not have fun on the weekend is gonna be a lost cause unless draconian measures are put in place by the government like France today (closing all restaurants, cafes, clubs, cinemas, et...)

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