Jump to content

Chapel Hill Carrboro Developments


KJHburg

Recommended Posts


This is why I think Chapel Hill's economic development strategy will only be moderately successful.  I think companies will keep locating in Durham and Wake to take advantage of Carolina grads without having to deal with things like this.

From the Triangle Biz Journal

""In 1989, White Oak Properties founder Roland Gammon bought a piece of property in Chapel Hill with plans to develop the site – but he didn’t realize it would take three decades to see a project approved. Over the next 32 years, the property would see proposal after proposal run into challenges and fail – until this week when the town approved a rezoning request for a new condo project on the property.  On Wednesday, the Chapel Hill Town Council unanimously approved a rezoning for Gammon and developer David Robert's proposed South Columbia Annex, allowing for the development of up to 57,000 square feet and 60 condo units plus up to 4,000 square feet commercial space.   The site is situated on a little less than 4 acres at 1150 S. Columbia St. – at Fordham Boulevard (Highway 54) south of downtown.""

Chapel Hill condo development scores approval – it only took three decades - Triangle Business Journal (bizjournals.com)

It will take a long time to change Chapel Hill's anti development reputation  which by the way is well deserved. 

 

Edited by KJHburg
  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree.  I’m fine with that though.  I’m not remotely a NIMBY.  I’d like to see thousand footers in Uptown, but I don’t want to see ten story buildings on Franklin Street, just like I wouldn’t want to see a fifty story building in South Park or in Greenwich Village.

Edited by SydneyCarton
  • Like 1
  • Sad 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

^This is not a personal attack, but no, it is not OK for it to take 32 years to develop a piece of property. That is indicative of a process that is deeply broken.

And if the demand is there, why shouldn't there be 10 story buildings on Franklin Street? The problem with the anti-growth mindset is that it doesn't make the demand go away - it just forces that demand further away, to a jurisdiction that will accommodate it. Downtown Chapel Hill/Carrboro is a nice, compact, pedestrian-friendly environment. Perhaps with additional density, the Durham-Orange LRT might have been more viable, maybe even on a better alignment that could have served Franklin Street. Instead, people who would prefer to live in Chapel Hill have to live in Chatham or Alamance County and drive everywhere. So while Chapel Hill "preserves" its character (meanwhile driving prices sky-high due to artificial scarcity), the rest of the region suffers the woes of endless sprawl. I realize that this exclusivity is a feature, not a bug, to some, but it is poor policy.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites


50 minutes ago, jthomas said:

^This is not a personal attack, but no, it is not OK for it to take 32 years to develop a piece of property. That is indicative of a process that is deeply broken.

And if the demand is there, why shouldn't there be 10 story buildings on Franklin Street? The problem with the anti-growth mindset is that it doesn't make the demand go away - it just forces that demand further away, to a jurisdiction that will accommodate it. Downtown Chapel Hill/Carrboro is a nice, compact, pedestrian-friendly environment. Perhaps with additional density, the Durham-Orange LRT might have been more viable, maybe even on a better alignment that could have served Franklin Street. Instead, people who would prefer to live in Chapel Hill have to live in Chatham or Alamance County and drive everywhere. So while Chapel Hill "preserves" its character (meanwhile driving prices sky-high due to artificial scarcity), the rest of the region suffers the woes of endless sprawl. I realize that this exclusivity is a feature, not a bug, to some, but it is poor policy.

We all have different perspectives, but Franklin Street is pristine.  Tall buildings would ruin it.  I would have a heart attack if someone wanted to build tall buildings in Charleston or Savannah too, or to build a ten story condo on Queens Rd. in Myers Park, regardless of the demand.  Some things should be preserved.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

54 minutes ago, jthomas said:

I get that. I support the preservation of historically significant buildings, and strongly advocate for new development to be sensitive to its context. However, healthy cities must be allowed to evolve. I know you love New York City - imagine if Manhattan had been frozen in place in 1780, or 1850, or 1920?

I stand by my assertion that Chapel Hill's anti-growth policies benefit a relative few (existing property owners) to the detriment of the rest of the region.

But NYC is a prime example.  I think it's ridiculous when people complain that proposed buildings in Midtown or in FiDi are too tall.    However, I'd strongly oppose tall buildings in most of Manhattan (i.e., Greenwich Village, SoHo, TriBeCa, UES, UWS, etc.).  Similarly, I'd love to see thousand foot towers built in Uptown Charlotte, but I'd hate to see tall towers in SouthPark.  

I like Chapel Hill how it is.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

No wonder Orange County is the slowest growing county of the 3 major counties of the Triangle growing at less than half the rate of Wake and about half of Durham's growth rate according to the Census Bureau

https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/fact/table/wakecountynorthcarolina,durhamcountynorthcarolina,orangecountynorthcarolina,NC/PST045219

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites


  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...
On 3/31/2021 at 4:35 PM, KJHburg said:

No wonder Orange County is the slowest growing county of the 3 major counties of the Triangle growing at less than half the rate of Wake and about half of Durham's growth rate according to the Census Bureau

https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/fact/table/wakecountynorthcarolina,durhamcountynorthcarolina,orangecountynorthcarolina,NC/PST045219

Why exactly does Orange County need growth? The presumption that growth is the be all end all of a successful area is very objectively, false. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/23/2021 at 8:22 PM, rolly said:

The other counties in the Triangle have to bear the costs of growth, so Orange County can sit back and reap the benefits of a growing area without paying the price. Handy!

Oh so you're saying growth is bad because 'costs' or good because 'benefits'? Who says Orange County isn't bearing the costs of adjacent county's reckless lack of planning?

Edited by Jones_
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.