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111 North First Street (1,425 residential units, 640 hotel rooms, 1 million sq. ft. office, 135,000 sq. ft. retail; numerous 15-30 story towers on 17 acres)


markhollin

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1 hour ago, smeagolsfree said:

Everything on the East Bank is in a flood zone. I cant remember how far the water went but I know the Titans stadium had issues. I will take a look at the photos from the flood.

Wasn't there a lot of talk about some kind of wall or barrier of some sort in the downtown area for flooding a few years ago?  I seem to remember that but don't recall if any plan was ever developed that would protect downtown in case we had another event like we had in 2010.  Now that we've got the Four Seasons project and others nearby that are at risk and probably more to come if the plans on this thread ever materialize that's a lot of expensive real estate that's very vulnerable. 

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Just now, MontanaGuy said:

Wasn't there a lot of talk about some kind of wall or barrier of some sort in the downtown area for flooding a few years ago?  I seem to remember that but don't recall if any plan was ever developed that would protect downtown in case we had another event like we had in 2010.  Now that we've got the Four Seasons project and others nearby that are at risk and probably more to come if the plans on this thread ever materialize that's a lot of expensive real estate that's very vulnerable. 

It was for the West Bank, and would’ve protected Sobro/Broadway

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Yikes!!  I assume that's from 2010. Will happen again sooner than later, absent a flood wall/levee. How might a developer build to account for more flooding in the future?  I'm still amazed at the prices those parcels are being sold for. 

I recall the proposal from a few years back to have a 'flood' canal (a'la San Antonio's) near I-24 to divert overflow from the Cumberland. I can see now how that might be needed. 

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This may be a misunderstanding of the 2010 flood, but wasn't that considered a pretty freak occurrence? I remember it was even frequently called a "100 year flood" as in an event like that could only happen once every century, along with being worsened due to a mistake with the handling of the dams/levees. I understand that flooding is to be expected there, but I'm not sure about it reaching the extent of 2010.

Again, I'm not positive on that, but it's how I remember it. I'd definitely appreciate anybody with better insight on the subject. 

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1 hour ago, Craiger said:

There also were no mismanaged dams. There was bad communication of necessary dam releases that were performed to keep those dams being dams instead of an open river. 

isn't that mismanaging dams though? In other words, if better communication was had, would the Cumberland still had flooded in the downtown and east bank area?

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25 minutes ago, nashvylle said:

isn't that mismanaging dams though? In other words, if better communication was had, would the Cumberland still had flooded in the downtown and east bank area?

No. If better communication was had, the city and hopefully it’s residents would have known sooner that they were going to be flooded. They had to release from the dams or the dams were going to overtop. Overtopping dams fail. The choice was between letting a lot of water out or a high risk of ALL the water.

There was a long report on this from the Army Corps and NWS. Generally when I reference it, folks just say it was a cover up because they just don’t want to believe that 20 inches of rain can cause catastrophic flooding of their city. 

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16 hours ago, henburg said:

This may be a misunderstanding of the 2010 flood, but wasn't that considered a pretty freak occurrence? I remember it was even frequently called a "100 year flood" as in an event like that could only happen once every century, along with being worsened due to a mistake with the handling of the dams/levees. I understand that flooding is to be expected there, but I'm not sure about it reaching the extent of 2010.

Again, I'm not positive on that, but it's how I remember it. I'd definitely appreciate anybody with better insight on the subject. 

The term 100 year flood just means that there's a 1% chance that a flood of that degree could happen in any given year. Similarly, a 1,000 year flood means that event has a 1 in 1,000 chance of happening in any given year.  

That said, I don't know how regularly these calculations are updated to account for new data (my assumption is that it doesn't happen very regularly) and even if the data is regularly updated it's still heavily weighted toward historical data that may not reflect our current climate. There are places in Texas that have had a few 500 year floods just in the last decade or so I believe, for example. 

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On 10/7/2020 at 8:29 AM, smeagolsfree said:

The occurrence of these floods will depend if you believe that climate change is real or not. Take the evidence and come to your own conclusion. 

A large number of people think that the climate is always changing, regardless of human activity.

On the Cumberland River and flooding:  Accurate records have only been kept for roughly 200 years - which on a geologic time scale is a data point of 1.  We simply haven't been observing the river long enough to come to any conclusions about how often it floods like in 2010, and the flood event itself really isn't impactful enough to leave discernable geologic records.  A couple days of high water doesn't really do anything to a forest, so it's not like we can dig into the ground and look for layers of silt deposited by previous mega floods.

The simple fact is the river can flood at any time and people should have insurance policies to cover the loss if they choose to build there. 

 

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I missed that Craig.  Great catch as this passed on consent and there was no discussion. I wish more projects would pass like that. 

 

Looking at the numbers I would guess three high-rise residential buildings/ 2 office buildings & 2 hotels. Now they could go more and less tall, but that is a guess based on the size of the property and that was my first guess to start with was around 7 to 8 high-rise buildings.

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Let me ask you guys this:  With all of this being in a “flood plain”…so to speak…do you just make sure to build everything with a garage underneath to minimize flood damage in the future?  It’s not like they’re going to build on 10 foot pads, are they?

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