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Frankie811

Should we tax students?

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Yeah, I think thew academic community needs to contribute more to city expenses, but I don't understand why this should be a direct tax to the students. Why not just raise the contribution in lieu of taxes that the institutions make to the city, and let THEM decide how they're going to pay for it, be it through student fees or tuition increases, or whatever?

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Yeah, I think thew academic community needs to contribute more to city expenses, but I don't understand why this should be a direct tax to the students.  Why not just raise the contribution in lieu of taxes that the institutions make to the city, and let THEM decide how they're going to pay for it, be it through student fees or tuition increases, or whatever?

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I'm not opposed to the students being taxed directly - Its a small amount but will add up quite well for the city. Also, if I understand it correctly none of the colleges in the city pay property tax. (correct me if I'm wrong on that). I don't see any reason why a private institution shouldn't be paying taxes. If I think of all the times I have had to call the police for petty issues (noise complaints, not being able to get out of my driveway because a car is blocking it, etc) it has been due to misbehavior of students well over half the time. When we lived near PC it would average close to once a week. Same goes for when we lived off hope. crazy.

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Providence has a cruddy economy because of government corruption and misguided socialism. It think it's cowardly to try to blame your problems on the only superior economic sector your economy has left.

Blaming the tax-free status of educational institutions is nothing more that a foolish game of politics by city leaders. I hope it gets them their desired votes next time around, because it sure won't help the city in any meaningful way.

Fortunately, these plans only amount to minor grumblings, and don't reflect any full-fledged hostility between city and university leaders. If you follow the news about Cambridge and Harvard, you'll know about real town-gown hostility.

Providence residents should ask themselves how they would feel if Brown were planning to do what Harvard is doing right now (moving literally half the undergraduate campus from Cambridge to Allston). Imagine if one day, Brown got fed up with all the hostility and moved half its campus to East Providence/Seekonk/Cranston/whatever. But again, fortunately city leaders in Providence aren't quite as hostile as Cambridge, and won't provoke that kind of reaction - yet.

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If you can keep the students here after school, you will be getting tax dollars, and younger.

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This idea that the universities have a free ride ignores what they contribute to the city in the way of public safety. Brown and RISD both have 24 hour EMS services that are often the first responders to non-college emergencies on the East Side. Brown and RISD have large public safety forces on the ground 24 hours a day on the East Side, Providence looks to them for help in managing crime on the East Side. Brown and RISD work very closely with the PPD. Brown built the Police Substation on Brooks Street, provided the furniture for it, and I believe they pay for the utilities as well. Brown has a special police detail on the East Side that they pay for. PC also pays for a special police detail on their campus, and they contract an ambulance service on weekends to take pressure off of Providence EMS. J&W has security Downcity 24/7. J&W and RISD both voluntarily pay into the the Downcity DID, providing funding for the Yellow Jackets.

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Providence has a cruddy economy because of government corruption and misguided socialism. It think it's cowardly to try to blame your problems on the only superior economic sector your economy has left.

Blaming the tax-free status of educational institutions is nothing more that a foolish game of politics by city leaders. I hope it gets them their desired votes next time around, because it sure won't help the city in any meaningful way.

Fortunately, these plans only amount to minor grumblings, and don't reflect any full-fledged hostility between city and university leaders. If you follow the news about Cambridge and Harvard, you'll know about real town-gown hostility.

Providence residents should ask themselves how they would feel if Brown were planning to do what Harvard is doing right now (moving literally half the undergraduate campus from Cambridge to Allston). Imagine if one day, Brown got fed up with all the hostility and moved half its campus to East Providence/Seekonk/Cranston/whatever. But again, fortunately city leaders in Providence aren't quite as hostile as Cambridge, and won't provoke that kind of reaction - yet.

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The economy of Providence is a bit better than cruddy. Nor would I classify the education sector of it the only one left. Is it important? Yes. And it is one which is certainly well cared for in this city. As with all relationships it requires constant attention. Being well versed as you appear to be on this topic, I'm calculating that you chose to ignor the entire synergy between the various schools within the downtown district, the resources required to sustain such a level of activity, the willingness of said educational institutions to share a fair proportion of the financial burden and the future promise the Jewelry District appears to hold from your critical thinking of the issue for good reason. How did you factor such a mass exodus without utilizing the obvious assets available first?

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The only time politicians blame schools for not paying taxes is when there aren't enough coming in.. So Captain Obvious is 100% correct; killing the schools is like cutting off your nose to spite your face.. The way to attack it, and I GUARANTEE most people that post here are vehemently opposed to this is.. Cut spending, give tax breaks to business to move to Providence.. There are something like 8 or 9 socialist programs that pay for housing for low income residents.. Just amazing.. The whole city is on housing assitance.. Cut the vouchers, bring in jobs, people work the jobs... Its that simple..

They just passed a business tax incentive law w/Fidelity Investments.. Hopefully, this will be HUGE for Prov.. The bottom line is, businesses coming in = tax rolls = jobs for residents = less dependance on social programs = strong workforce = great, growing, working city..

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and I GUARANTEE most people that post here are vehemently opposed to this is.. Cut spending, give tax breaks to business to move to Providence.. There are something like 8 or 9 socialist programs that pay for housing for low income residents.. Just amazing.. The whole city is on housing assitance.. Cut the vouchers, bring in jobs, people work the jobs... Its that simple..

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Maybe most, but not all. Get the businesses here, we obviously can't have a city without jobs, which seems to be what we are building.

But the housing programs have their benefits as well (streamlining them wouldn't hurt). Moving people from apartments, to home ownership creates neighbourhoods where people are invested in the quality of life, moving away from a transient lifestyle of moving from apartment to apartment allows people to establish roots. Owner occupied neighbourhoods are cared for by their residents, eventually saving the city money on infrastucture and public safety. Also, homeowners put much more into their properties than landlords, that leaky roof will be fixed sooner by a homeowner for example, putting more money into the pockets of contractors, to go out and spend money... trickle down economics, it works to a degree.

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Owner occupied neighbourhoods are cared for by their residents, eventually saving the city money on infrastucture and public safety.

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I agree 100%.. Although, I would like to clarify the difference between a resident landlord and an absentee landlord.. The neglect you speak of is generally attributed to absentee landlords.. They are the reason for a housing stock's decline, no question.. How are you going to keep a watchful eye on your tenants/property in RI from Boston or Florida?? Not possible.. These people are very bad for the city.. That is why they pay double the tax as owner occ, and 25% more than homestead landlords.. It is a well documented problem..

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Another interesting fact: I read somewhere that only 5% of all multifamily properties are owner occupied.. I haven't been able to find that info again to verify though..

I thought that was interesting.. Also, the owner occ rate on Fed Hill is one of the lowest in the city..

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