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That's true the Skyway system is a gem, usually I can get all my errands done in a short walk through one of the oldest and largest skyway systems.

Transit also includes biking. With one of the highest per capita of bicycle commuters in the USA, Mpls can have something to cheer about. Gotta' love zipping down the Midtown Greenway or the Cedar Lake trail without having to worry about much in the way of traffic, more so on the former, but fairly decent on the latter. A few more designated bike lanes DT would help though.

:)

Edited by City_of_Lakes

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On the one hand, the skyways are great. On the other hand, they remove pedestrians from the street level, making for rather dead streetlife. Also, they obstruct the view and make for a poor urban experience.

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I was in S.F. this past week for business and had to ride the BART a few times. The BAR offers a lot more than our Lite Rail does, but the sports are all just slabs of cement with no decoration and the trains are the original trail installed when the system was started.

Though I don't think we have the best transport system ever, it feels a lot nicer and safer than BART (Bay Area Rail Transit)

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K6-III

This is one aspect related to people getting around in Minneapolis, not the only way. Besides, the skyways are part of "this" urban experience, so that cannot be changed. Yes, it "...remove pedestrians from the street level, making for a rather dead streetlife." but again that is part of current Minneapolis. With the jump in urban core population to 30,000+ people there are definitely going to be changes associated with the amount of street level businesses and the pedestrian traffic that will accompany it in the next decade or so.

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I agree that the added population to the core of the city will make a significant change. The new residents will need added amenities which include late night eating, entertainment, and shopping. I would not be surprised to see a few convenience stores open up that offer 24 hour service. This will draw more people out to the streets when they know there is actually something they can get to after 7:00 PM.

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The Met Council voted in favor of the Central Corridor light-rail line between Minneapolis and St. Paul. The vote moves the application process to the Federal Transit Administration for preliminary engineering and design work to begin this fall.

The 11-mile route, known as the Central Corridor, will link with the Hiawatha line in Minneapolis and go through the University of Minnesota and on to downtown St. Paul. The route will run along University Avenue and will also have stops at the State Capitol and the Union Depot.

The price of the project has grown from $840 million to an estimated $930 million.

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The Met Council voted in favor of the Central Corridor light-rail line between Minneapolis and St. Paul. The vote moves the application process to the Federal Transit Administration for preliminary engineering and design work to begin this fall.

The 11-mile route, known as the Central Corridor, will link with the Hiawatha line in Minneapolis and go through the University of Minnesota and on to downtown St. Paul. The route will run along University Avenue and will also have stops at the State Capitol and the Union Depot.

The price of the project has grown from $840 million to an estimated $930 million.

Thanks for the updates Minneapolitan. :thumbsup:

I'm thrilled to see the Central Corridor moving right along.

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It'll be interesting to see if we can get some of these transit projects on the ball.. if the transportation bill had been put to referendum and passed, 40% of all funds raised through the new bill would pay for transit projects and the rest would speed up road projects around the state.

But of course, partisan bickering (Republicans didn't want to raise taxes as much while democrats wanted to raise the sales tax) has delayed it.

I really hope we can have some unity this fall after the elections (in my hopes, of course, for the democrats) so they can move forward on these important transit projects instead of just hoping that they'll magically appear and pay for themselves without costing a dime (The unrealistic hopes of some conservative ex-urban republicans)...

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When is the Central Corridor expected to be completed by??? Its a great idea!!! Boy, I sure wish Seattle had done something like this sooner!!! Thats what happens when partisan bickering gets in the way... :-( But oh well... I really want to move to Mineeapolis... I love cold winters and in the Puget Sound we just dont get those... ;-( But... when the time is right... i will move somewhere in the Midwest (Out of Minneapolis, Columbus, or Indianapolis). I like Minneapolis the best because its the most liberal, progressive and dense of the mentioned... Enough of me... GO METRO!!!

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Yeah, Minneapolis is progressive.. but one of my favorite things about Minnesota is that you'll see an old beefed up pickup truck with the biggest hick looking guy driving in it... hunting rifle and dog in the seat next to him with a six pack in the back.. and "Wellstone" and "Kerry" sticker on the back... It just confounds people.

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that would be interesting! A testament to ignorant stereotypes. Seattle/Tacoma generally lives up to stereotypes... the very democratic ones live in their nice homes/condos/apartments and drive nice cars while the Republicans generally are little more laid back... not to say that is always the case.... but Seattle is very progressive and liberal... more so than Spokane in Eastern Washington, yet Spokane still has its urban flair...

But isnt this a transit forum... Im interested in someone answering my questions.... please.... ;-)

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The central corridor would be completed by around 2010/11 if all funding goes through properly. The metropolitan council just approved the light rail plan (over BRT).

Out of Columbus, Indianapolis, and Minneapolis, Minneapolis is the largest and most liberal. It also has a large student population and a thriving arts/theater scene. Property prices are getting higher and higher.. but they're not so outrageous like they are in California and in the east. $275,000 will still buy you a decent house in the suburbs... you'll pay more for a condo downtown.

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Condos in downtown will not cost you more than a house, they will just be smaller.

In Downtown St Paul, in particular, one can get a fantastic value.

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I know this is hella late, but Snowguy, you do mean that Minneapolis' metro area is the largest, right? Because Indianapolis: 785,000 and 2,000,000 in metro. Columbus: 730,000 and 1,840,000 in metro. And... Minneapolis: 375,000 and 3,100,000 in metro. Minneapolis is by far the densest of those three mentioned cities. Minneapolis is my favorite followed by Columbus and then Idianapolis, even though I love them all! :P Anyway, back to transit!!! :P

Edited by [email protected]

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I think transit in the Twin Cities will see a major boost in the next few years, but a lot of that lies in this Tuesdays' election.

The transportation ammendment on the ballot that would dedicate all taxes levied from car sales to transportation says that at least 40% must be used for public transit and no more than 60% for highway funding.

The question is lengthy and difficult to understand. Many people from rural Minnesota are voting no because they think they will be short changed as public transit is not feasible in many areas. If you don't vote, it counts as a no.

Either way, all three gubernatorial candidates have now said they will work to expand transit projects in the state. Many of these plans are for a streetcar system in Minneapolis with 2 or 3 new Light Rail Transit lines to be built, one of them quite extensive (The SW corridor through Hopkins, St. Louis Park, and Minnetonka) along with the central corridor.

Commuter rail is ready to be implemented on the Northstar route from downtown Minneapolis to Big Lake with future expansions to St. Cloud and northward. Also, the Red Rock Corridor is being looked at to connect the southeastern suburbs to St. Paul and Minneapolis.

Personally, I would like to see Minneapolis/St. Paul get very serious about the public transit issue and develop a world class system that uses LRT, Street cars, and subways. Many European cities of smaller size that are comparable in density have much larger public transit systems. It will gaurantee a successful future for the Twin Cities to be ahead of the game on transit. Make it a world class city! Why not?

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I was just thinking about this a bit. I think it would be better if the central corridor LRT was put underground for major portions of its route. Of course it would be above ground over the river and along more residential areas, but wouldn't it serve better in the long run to have run underground near the downtown areas/University?

It would certainly be able to travel faster thanks to uninterrupted track and lack of pedestrians/cars... say up to 55mph. This would increase efficiency greatly and provide for more connectibility to future lines (into St. Paul neighborhoods, for example).

I just don't understand the anemic plans for public transit. The 30 year plans include only 2 commuter rail routes and 3-4 LRT lines with a major focus on bus transportation. WHo knows what the state of buses and transit will be like in 30 years.. not to mention that 30 years is a very long time to spend on menial things like a few LRT lines. The 30 year plan should include major expansions to the transit system so that in 30 years one can travel in any direction out of the city on rail of some kind.

Call it nostalgia or just a more efficient, practical way of getting people where htey need to go.. BRT is only effective along freeway corridors, and not everyone lives next to a freeway.

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No doubt! Not to mention that TOD's would increase all over the place. Wouldn't that be great, little hubs of energy all along train lines throughout the cities.

Random thought: Too bad the subway was never built that some were advocating for decades ago. That could've been the start of a beautiful system.

Funny how one of the route options being studied for the SW Corridor would put the train underground below Nicollet (Eat Street) on its way from the Midtown Greenway towards DT. While I realize that this street is far narrower than University Ave, nonetheless it is still a very busy neighborhood both vehicle and pedestrian traffic wise. Would be so nice if the light rail vehicles could more unhindered from one stop to the next. Darn it, there are so many stipulations the FTA puts out in order for projects to get approval for 50% match funding. <_<

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