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grasscat

Cincinnati: Ivorydale and Industrial St. Bernard

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Hi

Please check out my newest photo tour of Ivorydale and the industrial areas of the city of St. Bernard:

CINCINNATI TOURS: Ivorydale and Industrial St. Bernard

Ivorydale was built by P&G in 1886 as the headquarters of its manufacturing concerns. Today, most of the buildings have been sold off but are still in use.

St. Bernard is an independent city along I-75 a few miles north of downtown Cincinnati, along the Mill Creek. While the residential and commercial areas lie east of the interstate, the portion west of I-75 along Spring Grove Ave. and Vine St. are heavily industrial and criss-crossed with a network of railroad tracks.

The above link features maps, aerials, and over 90 photos from the tour, along with descriptions-as well as separate pages featuring the history and the demographics of the area. There is also the capability to jump around to various areas within the page.

I have also added a guestbook. Please sign it-it

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Wow, outstanding grasscat.

This is my favorite thread from you yet. I am facinated by this area and look forward to a tour of this one day.

The Mill Creek looked awful there.

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Thanks, monte. I'll go there with you any time you'd like to see it--maybe when you're completely moved in. Just give me a holler.

Yes, the Mill Creek looks pretty bad there. What's interesting is that I've done tours of a lot of Mill Creek communities latey. In Hartwell, Carthage and northern Elmwood Place, it's pretty and tree-lined (if probably not so clean). The southern part of Elmwood Place sees a creek with no trees, and by St. Bernard it is completely channelized.

It's funny that I've read a lot of accounts of how pristine the Mill Creek was when this area was first settled, and then by the turn of the 20th century people were writing about how it was basically an open sewer that caused disease.

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