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eandslee

Centennial Tower

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A staircase in the back of one of the small buildings is down. To finish up the telephone work, I think.

A Barrier is repositioned in the back lot to make room for demo. I think that if Goodstein gets financing.... they will buy the Bagby parking lot. That maybe the real hold-up, "Money". Thus, no application for the building permit. :mellow:

According to last Sunday's Commercial Notes in the RTD, a 6,440 s/f building at 6 South 5th Street was recently sold to Royal Flush Properties for + $800K.

This structure is wedged between the Red Cross building on the corner of 5th and Cary and the Pollard & Bagby building on 5th Street.

Maybe Goodstein is also Royal Flush Properties and will build a skinny parking tower at 6 S. 5th to accommodate some of his office/hotel/condo tenants. :tough:

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LOI : Letter of Intent. ( to buy)

No , Parking is not solved. Now , with 30 stories even more parking is needed. In 22000 sq. feet of parkinging cars can hardly move.

21000 sq. feet is less then 20% of the city block.

The extra floors seem to be for parking.

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Good note Burt ! The buiding was sold to lawyers. Painting of interior and work was done. building not big enough. I think parking has to be within 150 feet of new stucture. I should think 1800 spaces are needed for centenial tower. Thats about 125 thousand sq feet. Thats as close as I can get to what is required.

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Good note Burt ! The buiding was sold to lawyers. Painting of interior and work was done. building not big enough. I think parking has to be within 150 feet of new stucture. I should think 1800 spaces are needed for centenial tower. Thats about 125 thousand sq feet. Thats as close as I can get to what is required.

This property is zoned B-4, which means off-premises parking can be up to 500 ft away.

From the city's zoning ordinances:

(4) Dwelling, multifamily:

a. One main building on a lot of record - 1 space per dwelling unit

b. More than one main building on a lot of record - 1.5 per dwelling unit containing 2 bedrooms or more; 1.25 per dwelling unit containing fewer than 2 bedrooms

c. In B and UB districts where such units are contained within the same building as a nondwelling use - None for 3 units; otherwise, 1 per 4 dwelling units

(7) Tourist home, hotel or motel:

a. RO-3, HO, B-4, B-5, RF-1, RF-2, CM, DCC districts - 1 per guestroom up to 100 rooms, plus 1 per every 2 guestrooms over 100 rooms

(23) Office: general; medical or dental office or clinic; social service delivery use; animal hospital - 1 per 300 sq. ft. of floor area for the first 1,500 sq. ft., plus 1 per 400 sq. ft. in excess thereof

Sec. 114-710.2. Off-street parking not required in certain districts.

In CM, DCC, B-4, B-5, B-6 and B-7 zoning districts, off-street parking spaces shall not be required for uses other than dwelling uses, hotels and motels. In B and UB districts, off-street parking spaces shall not be required for two or fewer dwelling units where such units are contained within the same building as a nondwelling use.

Edited by wrldcoupe4

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I wonder how many sq. feet is required for each parked car. There must be statistics that show this in a tower.

In new garage construction then can get around 3 per 1000 sqf. In the older garages they were around 2 per 1k sqf. That is inclusive of everything: columns, ramps, stairways, elevators, exits etc. Taking all that into account you get the 3 per 1k

These are construction averages, not what the code call for based of building space. If the code calls for 1.5 space per residence and you have 200 residences then you need 300 spaces. Based on new construction numbers, you would need 300,000 sqf of garage to accommodate the spaces.

Edited by thatguy

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Given the above zoning definitions, the residential would be "contained within the same building as a nondwelling use." If this is valid, then technically they'd only need 1 space for every 4 dwelling units (not that this would be very marketable to a prospective buyer). A ratio of 1/1 seems better.

They'll need 1 per 400 SF of office. There is 46,000 SF of office space (115 spaces). A parking ratio of 4/1000 for office is common.... downtown, the parking ratios tend to be smaller.

They'd need 111 or so for the hotel.

Edited by wrldcoupe4

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In new garage construction then can get around 3 per 1000 sqf. In the older garages they were around 2 per 1k sqf. That is inclusive of everything: columns, ramps, stairways, elevators, exits etc. Taking all that into account you get the 3 per 1k

These are construction averages, not what the code call for based of building space. If the code calls for 1.5 space per residence and you have 200 residences then you need 300 spaces. Based on new construction numbers, you would need 300,000 sqf of garage to accommodate the spaces.

The larger the footprint for the garage, the more spaces you can get as a ratio of square footage. For example, the new Carilion Clinic parking garage in Roanoke will have 1500 spaces in a 450,000 sf building. It pushes the density to 3.33 spaces per 1k sqfeet. This is because the floors are larger, so a higher ratio of each floor is dedicated to parking instead of ramps. Each floor of the Carilion Clinic garage is 64,000 ft including ramps. My point is that garages with bigger footprints are more economical, and thats what Centenial's developers should be aiming for, if possible.

BTW - What is the largest parking garage in the Richmond area?

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largest? My guess would be the new state garage near the Monroe building, near the reconciliation statue. That one was around 3 or just a touch over 3. I walked it one day...don't ask...LOL

3 per 1000 is an average and you are correct, the larger footprint is conducive to a higher car per ft ratio. What can surprise you is the number of sqft needed for 500, 750 or 1000 cars...it is huge. Something that one does not realize until the numbers are crunched.

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We don't know what numbers they are using. The city still needs to appove the plan and they experience parking problems enough to know the building must enough parking.. That building needs more space for parking and it's not econmical to build a tower to house cars...only 32 dollars a square foot lease holders will be profitable. The lot is needed..... and the buildings on the top of the block at 5th and main.

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at "serveral floors of parking" we are looking at 2200 sq feet , say 4 times is 88000 sq feet. Thats not enough. :) Back to Baskerville and more drawings !

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650, 000 sq. feet. (proposed)

retail 22000

office 46000

of suits 46000

hotel 92000

reside.252000

--------------------

leaves 192000. at 281 dollars per sq. ft. cost of building .. equals 53 million 9 hundred fifty two thousand dollars to build parking.

Give me some sound judgement...... please! I'm going crazy.

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sb Cox demo dump trucks are going in and out of the back alley, to day,Friday. They can make mince-meat from those buildings in no time. :)

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It looks like they are working the building closest to the law office building. I guess they want to get clear from the attaching wall before full demo takes place.

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It looks like they are working the building closest to the law office building. I guess they want to get clear from the attaching wall before full demo takes place.

Yup, since those 3 buildings next door are still in use. So I think I am reading all this correctly (and I know the theory is sound also, having had it pounded in my head) that there is a 192,000 sf parking garage going in on the base of this... and it has a 22,000 sf footprint. That would be a 8 or 9 story or so parking deck, then the office and residential. With ground floor retail, you could be looking at the deck ending up at the 10th story. That isnt unusual in places with high water tables. Does anyone know if there is plans to go further down under the existing buildings and bury some more levels of the parking? That would make the most sense to me... if you have to either drive up or down 4 floors, as opposed to up 8. Going further with this... if you look at the rendering there is a significant architectural break at about the 10th story... this could be consistent with the end of the parking deck and the beginning of the 'usable' floor space.

As far as the parking ratios go, in a shared parking situation you can occassionally get away with 1 space per 400sf (office or retail) when the businesses close at 5. Leaving only restuarants open. In that case, there are parking decks in the area which are entirely empty after 5... hence why Capital Ale is allowed the full use of the deck next door after a certain point in the day. If Centennial has worked out a similar deal, then they could provide parking elsewhere and reduce their needed expense on a parking deck.

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For a 30 story building... Shafts need to be driven down for the foundation. Could the pounding upset the soil and foundations of the the other buildings? I think so.

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I don't think they would need to put piles into the ground. Instead, they would pour caissons similar to what they did for Vistas and now Meadwestvaco. Someone in construction could better elaborate though...

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For a 30 story building... Shafts need to be driven down for the foundation. Could the pounding upset the soil and foundations of the the other buildings? I think so.

The Comcast Center in Philly was built on the same block as a church, it is MUCH taller than Centennial will be and the church is just fine. I think the construction industry knows how to work around existing buildings.

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Agree. It is a standard move in the industry and nothing new will be presented at the tower. Keep in mind, those buildings have been there a very long time. Stability of the soil is not an issue. If a sub floor is to be excavated, sheet plies will be driven. These babys can handle anything they support...even another building's foundation. Most likely large footings using caissons will be done.

Looks like the roof and floors have been removed from the adjoining building's wall and demo of the first building is almost done, as of 1:00 today. By now it could be done.

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Leaving work around 5:30, the building closest to the 3 holdouts still had over half of its facade standing, but I suspect it could be gone by tomorrow or at the latest week's end.

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Are you guys still of the opinion that the corner structure will be retained in the tower's design, or saved for demolition until the end?

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